Skip Ribbon Commands
Skip to main content
 

 Follow Me

 
 
 
 
 

 SharePoint Blog List

 
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
Todd Klindt's home page > Todd Klindt's Office 365 Admin Blog
What's going on with TK.
July 09
Finding SharePoint 2010 Workflows in SharePoint Online

By now you’ve probably seen Microsoft’s announcement that they’re going to remove SharePoint 2010 Workflows on November 1st, 2020. SharePoint 2013 Workflows aren’t too far behind. Not only did they not give us much time to rewrite these workflows in Power Automate, there aren’t any great ways to find out where they are in the first place. Since the beauty of SharePoint is how it empowers users to create, it’s likely that users are making workflows all over and admins have no exposure to it. Today I’m going to show you how to use the SharePoint Modernization Scanner (SMS) to find those Workflows that will soon be shown the door. The SMS is a general tool that helps people already in Office 365 to Modernize individual pieces of the platform. Workflow is one of those pieces.  So while the tool wasn’t meant for exactly this scenario, it fits nicely.

To get started, download the SMS from the link on this page. It’s going to come down as an EXE, there’s no installation. I recommend copying it to its own location. When it creates its logs it creates them in the folder it was run from, and I’ve found it helpful to keep all of that in one place. In the screenshots in this blog post, I copied

SharePoint.Modernization.Scanner.exe to D:\SMAT. When you run the tool without any parameters it guides you through a UI Wizard. The first decision you have to make is how you’re going to authenticate against your tenant.

image

The default option is “Azure AD App Only” and it’s my recommendation that you go that route. You’ll notice there’s a very comfy looking “Username and password” option farther down the list. It’s tempting to go that route, as it’s much easier, but if you’re running the tool seriously in production, go to the extra work and create an App Registration for it. If there’s interest, I might do a blog post on that, too. It’s less scary than it seems. Here’s what my screen looked like all filled out.

image

The Application ID can be copied directly from the Overview page of the App Registration itself. The domain is the Azure AD domain, and it will most likely be a *.onmicrosoft.com address. This can be a bit confusing since we’re doing all of this in the context of SharePoint. It can feel like you should use tenant.sharepoint.com, but that won’t work. The App Registration is an Azure AD thing that happens to work with SharePoint. If you’re not sure what the correct Domain is, go to the Azure Active Directory Dashboard Overview page and find Primary Domain.

image

You will also need the PFX file for the certificate that was used for the App Registration, and the password for that cert.

After you’ve entered that hit Next. The next screen lets you choose which Site Collections you’ll be scanning. The environments I’ve run this on are small enough that I’ve been able to stick with the “Complete Tenant” option, but you can also choose them individually or feed the tool a CSV file. These options are handy if your tenant is large. You also need to enter your SharePoint tenant name in this screen.

image

The next screen is the whole reason we’re here, to scan those Workflows. The tool can find all manner of objects that can Modernized, and I encourage you to scan for all of them at some point, but I just chose Workflows to speed things along.

image

The final screen has some options. I always go with the defaults.

image

Hit “Start scan” and then anxiously await the report. It’ll look like this.

image

Maybe pop some popcorn. It might take a minute. Finally you’ll get this:

image

If you want to run it all from the command line like a hot shot, run this command with your own values in place of mine.

.\SharePoint.Modernization.Scanner.exe --azuretenant M365x541279.onmicrosoft.com --certificatepfx "d:\smat
\SMAT App Reg.pfx" --certificatepfxpassword pass@word1 --tenant M365x541279 --mode WorkflowOnly --clientid a204b312-c2a9-4a47-861c-b0c874e8219a

It looks like this:

image

Once the scanner is finished it’ll drop a bunch of files into the folder listed above. Mine looked like this:

image

Since we only care about Workflows we can jump right into the ModernizationWorkflowScanResults.csv file and see where workflows are hiding out in our tenant. You may also want to give Errors.csv a once over just to see if everything went fine. Here’s my workflow report:

image

The report is pretty good. We can see I have two workflows, one 2010 and 2013. We can see which site and list they’re in. We can also see that the 2010 is published (Enabled) and the 2013 is only saved. If you go farther to the right there are also columns that indicate when it was changed last. Lots of good information there. At this point you’ll probably want to reach out to the site owner and have them verify if the Workflow is being used. You or they will have to connect with SharePoint Designer (still free) and start figuring out how to turn that workflow into a Flow.

I could end the blog post here. I’ve delivered the promised content, and did a fine job if I do say so myself. You’ve gotten your money’s worth. Smile I want to add one additional bit though. In that same report directory is Office 365 Classic workflow inventory.xlsx. That’s another Excel document with workflow information, but it uses a fancy Pivot Table to show it. You and I, we’re technical folks. The raw spreadsheet with sites and lists is what we wanted. But we likely have bosses (with or without pointy hair) and they like pictures. That’s where this last file comes in. Open up Office 365 Classic workflow inventory.xlsx and click “Enable” in the bar at the top. When you click Enable the spreadsheet will load the information from the ModernizationWorkflowScanResults.csv file and make it look all pretty.

image

That version will look better on a PowerPoint. You’ve got some filters to play with, really put some polish on it. Smile 

Hopefully this will help you chase down the SharePoint 2010 and 2013 Workflows in your Office 365 tenant. Let me know how it worked. You can leave a comment here, or reach out on Twitter at @toddklindt.

tk

ShortURL: https://www.toddklindt.com/FindO365Workflows

Edit (7/9/20): Edited to replace wrong tool name with SharePoint Modernization Scanner.

Edit (7/10/20): Edited to add command line syntax.

July 06
SharePoint 2010 and 2013 Workflows Kaput in Office 365

Hot off the presses! Today Microsoft announced the SharePoint 2010 workflow retirement in Office 365. They sort of buried it, but SharePoint 2013 workflows are meeting the same fate. Here’s a quick breakdown of the dates where stuff stops working:

SharePoint 2010 workflows turned off for new tenants

August 1, 2020

SharePoint 2010 workflow turned off for ALL tenants November 1, 2020
SharePoint 2013 workflow turned off for new tenants November 1, 2020
SharePoint 2013 workflow turned off for ALL tenants TBD

The following built-in workflows will also be removed; Approvals, Collect Feedback, Collect Signatures, Classic pages publishing Approval, and Three-state.

How do you know which workflow engine your workflows are using? It doesn’t really matter. They’re both going away. They should both be replaced with Power Automate flows. If you’ve been putting it off, now is the time to get on it. You do, however, need to know where all of these workflows are in your tenant. Microsoft has a tool, the SharePoint modernization scanner, that will search out classic workflows, among other things. It’s pretty painful tool to use, so I wouldn’t break it out late in the afternoon on Halloween. If I’m feeling sadistic, I may make a walkthrough of it. Once you have a good handle on where the workflows are being used in your tenant you can decide which ones to jettison, and which ones get to be reborn into flows.

Let me know what you think about it. Let me know how this impacts you. The July 15th, 2020 episode of Ask Sympraxis will cover this topic. Join us. It’s free. It’ll be a hoot, and worth every penny you spend on it.

tk

https://www.toddklindt.com/SP2010Workflows

June 01
Are you joining us for Ask Sympraxis? Why not?

Every couple of weeks me and my fellow Sympraxians get together on Wednesday for an open forum we call Ask Sympraxis. Anyone can get on and chat with us. We take questions to seed the discussion and then we all sit around and chat. If you’re not already attending, we’d love for you to join us. You can add it to your calendar, or you can just jump into the Teams meeting the first and third Wednesday of the month at 11:30 Central Time.

If you want to get some free advice from us, or just talk about how great Marc’s hair is, stop by and say hello.

tk

ShortURL: https://www.toddklindt.com/AskSympraxis

May 21
Using PowerShell to Find Power Apps that use the SharePoint Connector

I recently had a fun task come across my desk. A customer of mine has a large tenant, with a lot of Power Apps and a lot of Power App makers. They’re doing a tenant migration, and the Power Apps themselves will likely move over pretty easily. A lot of them are connecting to the tenant’s SharePoint site, and after the tenant move those SharePoint URLs are going kaput. The customer wanted to be able to find out which Power Apps were going to be broken so they could reach out to the owners to get them fixed. That’s where I, and my PowerShell prowess came in.

I had whipped up some quick and dirty PowerShell for this customer before so they asked if I could work my magic with this. I have dabbled a bit with the Power Apps and Flow Power Automate PowerShell in the past, and while I found it… lacking, I figured this was something it could handle. Here is the PowerShell I eventually went with:

Get-AdminPowerApp | ForEach-Object { if (Get-AdminPowerAppConnectionReferences -EnvironmentName $(Get-PowerAppEnvironment).EnvironmentName -AppName $_.AppName | Where-Object -Property ConnectorName -EQ -Value "shared_sharepointonline") {$_ | Select-Object DisplayName, @{Label="Owner";e={$_.Owner.displayName}},@{Label="Email";e={$_.Owner.userPrincipalName}}, AppName }}

Here’s what it looks like when it runs:

image

I have the following two Power Apps modules installed with these versions:

2.0.61 Microsoft.PowerApps.Administration.PowerShell
1.0.9
Microsoft.PowerApps.PowerShell

(Full list of Office 365 PowerShell modules)

You’ll get prompted to log in. The account will have to have the necessary permissions to enumerate all of the Power Apps in the tenant.

I know what you’re thinking, “Todd, that’s amazing! Solid work! I hate to seem greedy, but, um, where is the URL of the SharePoint site the Power App is connecting to?” That’s a funny story, but the punchline is, there isn’t a way. At least not from the PowerShell modules we have today. Apparently the Center of Excellence Starter Kit has a way to get that information, but it’s a really big hammer for a nail this small.

This will work for any of the Connectors. You can use the following PowerShell to see all Connectors that are in use:

Get-AdminPowerAppConnection | Select-Object ConnectorName

That will give you the value you need to search for with the Where-Object. If you’re looking for more ways to abuse Power Apps and Power Automate with PowerShell (so many Powers there) you can watch Shane’s so-so PowerShell for PowerApps and Flow video. It’s okay. I guess. In a pinch.

Enjoy.

tk

ShortUrl: https://www.toddklindt.com/PoshFindPowerAppsConnectors

April 17
Podcast 454 - Quarantine Beard

Today Todd has Marc Anderson from Sympraxis on to talk. They start with talking about the changes taking place everywhere with the response to the virus. They do talk a bit about technology while talking about how this has impacted the way everyone works. They do spend a little time talking about Teams updates that are coming as well as an event they're doing to try to stay connected. And talk a bit about community content to share real world solutions.

Recorded 4/8/2020

Audio File

Video File

Podcast 454 - Quarantine Beard (Time 0_24_14;21)

YouTube (Subscribe)

Subscribe in iTunes

Running Time: 47:07

Links:

27:00 SharePoint Mobile App Branding
26:55
Microsoft Monitoring Cloud Services
40:03
Ask Sympraxis
41:48
Microsoft 365 Community Content

ShortURL: https://www.toddklindt.com/Podcast454

April 14
Podcast 453 - Holes All Over My Walls

Much life all of life these days, today's podcast focuses on the Covid-19 pandemic and its impact on technology. Todd talks about Microsoft's response and some ways you can stay connected.

Recorded 3/25/2020

Audio File

Video File

Podcast 453 - Holes All Over My Walls (Time 0_23_11;07)

YouTube (Subscribe)

Subscribe in iTunes

Running Time: 39:36

Links:

The Intrazone - Crisis Management and Remote Work
Teams Thursday virtual events
My own presence indicator
Teams Presence Publisher

ShortURL: https://www.toddklindt.com/Podcast453

April 10
Podcast 452 - Just Be Me

This week Shane is busy and Todd is taking over on his own for a while. He is able to share some of the things he's been dying to talk about for a while. Things like a change in the default sharing for OneDrive, Web Apps in Chromium Edge, and then of course focusing on PowerShell 7. Then he talks about the current world crisis and how Microsoft is trying to help. Wrapping up with some talk about Tesla and where he's going to be speaking in the coming months.

Recorded 3/11/2020

Audio File

Video File

Podcast 452 - Just Be Me (Time 0_13_42;17)

YouTube (Subscribe)

Subscribe in iTunes

Running Time: 35:49

Links:

02:41 "People with Existing Access" will be the default when sharing a file
05:19
Installing Web Apps on Chromium Edge
12:23
PowerShell 7 and a Whole Lot More
15:00
Office 365 PowerShell Module Installs
18:00
How To Use PowerShell ISE Mode In Visual Studio Code
23:43
Microsoft Teams Giving Away Paid Features for Six Months Due to Coronavirus
28:50
Crisis Communication Power App
30:38
Free Supercharging for Tesla Model S purchases
34:10
SharePoint Conference
34:35
Techorama Belgium

ShortURL: https://www.toddklindt.com/Podcast452

April 01
Office 365 PowerShell with the Omaha SPUG

In these times of uncertainty and trouble we all need something to feel good about. You know what makes me feel good? PowerShell, that’s what. Tomorrow, April 2nd, at 11:30 CDT, I’ll be remotely presenting my fan favorite “PowerShell with Office 365” presentation for the Omaha SharePoint User Group. Even if you’re not quarantined in Omaha, I’d love for you to join me. I’ll be telling you how I use PowerShell and sharing scripts for you to quietly make fun of.

Here is an ICS file to add the Teams meeting to your schedule. If you’re a crazy person and want to throw caution to the wind, here’s a direct link to the Teams meeting itself.

Thanks to David and Amber at the Omaha SPUG for inviting me. I appreciate it.

tk

ShortURL: https://www.toddklindt.com/OmahaSPUGtalk2020

March 27
Podcast 451 - Evaporated from Both of our Memories

Shane and Todd are busy this week talking about a lot of fun technology stuff. They start off talking about how they're almost caught up to catching up in production. And then dive into some technical fun about Windows updates followed by some ChrEdge goodies and wrapping up with all the fun you can have with some phones and new apps.

Recorded 2/19/2020

Audio File

Video File

title clip 

YouTube (Subscribe)

Subscribe in iTunes

Running Time: 43:15

Links:

04:20 UN SharePoint Hack. Should I worry?
28:10 Microsoft’s Unified Office App for Android Now Available to Everyone
31:55 Samsung Galaxy Z Flip, Microsoft Your Phone could change the way you use mobile tech

ShortURL: https://www.toddklindt.com/Podcast451

March 25
How to Keep Unwanted Visitors out of my Basement Office

With all of the working from home that’s going on, and all of the kids not going to school, it can be tough to keep the latter out of the former. In my continuing practice of making things more complicated than they need to be, I came up with a way for my kids to know they should not go down into the basement.

20200320_141751

Come on down. And…

20200320_141733

You shall not pass!

I posted those pictures on Facebook and a few friends asked me what I was using. It’s not as complicated as I’d like it to be, but it’s a work in progress. I can control it with an IR remote, an app on my phone, and with my digital assistant, Alexa. When I’m at my desk I only need to bark out, “Alexa, set busy lights to Red!” and she does.

I cobbled my solution together with parts I already had in “that damned box.” Since some of you don’t have that box (I feel so bad for you), here’s a link to a comparable package, Nexlux LED Strip Lights. If you want to put your own package together you’ll need three pieces; a power supply, a controller, and an LED light strip. You’ll find a nearly endless supply of combinations of those on Amazon. I used double-sided tape to stick the light strip to the door frame. The light strip has adhesive on the back, but my experience has shown that the heat from the LEDs degrades that adhesive pretty quickly.

I mentioned above that I have a few ways to change the light colors based on the controller I have. There is the included IR remote, the included app, and Alexa integration. Right now I don’t have any automation set up where the lights change based on my presence in Office 365 or my calendar. That may come later.

I was telling a friend of mine about this. He’s less inclined to nerd out on things like this. His loss. He thought he might just connect a string of Christmas lights up to a smart plug and get the same result. That would work too and would have all the same integration points depending on which smart plug you get. I have a few Wemo smart plugs from Belkin and they’ve treated me pretty well. They also integrate with IFTTT so I can have them flash a lamp when the garage door opens, fun things like that.

If this article was interesting, let me know. I’ll post some of my other home automation projects.

tk

ShortURL: https://www.toddklindt.com/SmartBusyLight

1 - 10Next
 

 Subscribe to my Netcast

 

You can watch Shane and I's Cloudy Podcast live every Wednesday Morning at 10:00 am Central US time at http://www.toddklindt.com/Netcast

You can subscribe to the Podcast in the following ways:

MP3 Audio

Windows WMV video

YouTube Channel

 

 SPDocKit

 
 

 Todd's Upcoming Events

 
  
  
There are no items to show in this view of the "Events" list.