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No presence informationTodd O. Klindt7/8/2019 8:40 AMPowerShell2 

PowerShell does a pretty good job handling dates and times due to its good foundation with .NET and its focus on being cool to use PowerShell users. For basic DateTime formatting the help for Get-Date shows some great, easy to use examples.

help Get-Date –Examples

image

There’s –Format, –UFormat, and –DisplayHint, and those are all before we get to the flexibility that is .tostring(). There’s a lot of options, sometimes it’s too many options. Sometimes trying to string together exact combination of time and date information I’m looking for is a lot of work. Once again, PowerShell is there for me in the form of .GetDateTimeFormats()

(Get-Date).GetDateTimeFormats()

It lists out a collection of precanned DateTime formats you can select from:

image

You can use one of those formats just by selecting its index number:

image

That’s the good news. The bad news is that you have to specify which number you want, and there are 133 formats in the list. If the one that really tickles your fancy is #87 you have to count the lines until you get to it.

Until now.

I had danced this dance a few times, squinting to find that just perfect DateTime format I was looking for and counting the lines leading up to it. Then I put my PowerShell mojo to good use and came up with this little gem:

(Get-Date).GetDateTimeFormats() | foreach {$I = 0} { Write-Host "$I - $_" ; $I++ }

Edit 7/9/2019

A helpful reader suggested this even shinier gem:

(Get-Date).GetDateTimeFormats() | foreach-object -begin {$I = 0} -process {[pscustomobject]@{Index = $I;Value = $_}; $I++ }

This lists each format, along with its index number.

image

Once you’ve found the format of your dreams you can look to its left and see what its index is.

(Get-Date).GetDateTimeFormats()[27]

image

If you want to use it with a variable instead of Get-Date, it looks like this:

image

Now you have no excuses for getting exactly the DateTime format you want.

tk

ShortURL: https://www.toddklindt.com/PoshFormatDateTime

  
No presence informationTodd O. Klindt7/2/2019 8:16 AMOffice 365; Sharepoint1 

Another July 1st, another nervous couple of weeks. Fortunately the news this year was good, I was renewed.

SNAGHTML635de263

Microsoft’s MVP Program is a way that they reward non-Microsoft folks for the contributions they’ve made to the community over the last year. I’ve done enough over the last year to meet that high bar, which is something that I’ve aspired to every year since 2006 when I got my first MVP award.

Being in the MVP Program has been great for me. I have learned so much and made some great lifelong friends. It has been lifechanging.

Congratulations to the other renewed and newly awarded MVPs.

tk

ShortURL: https://www.toddklindt.com/2019MVPAward

  
No presence informationTodd O. Klindt7/1/2019 9:49 AMOffice 365; PowerShell0 

A few months ago I wrote one of my favorite blog posts, Connecting to Office 365 with Multiple Accounts in PowerShell without Losing Your Damned Mind and I think it’s safe to say that no damned minds have been lost connecting to multiple Office 365 tenants since. A lesser man might have stopped there. He might have felt his mark on the world was made and he might just bask in the glory of all of that love and adoration. Not this guy. Today, I present you an even better way to connect to Office 365 with multiple accounts in PowerShell without losing your damned mind and without loading any additional modules!*

*(as long as you already have the PnP PowerShell module installed, that is)

Between that fateful day and today the delightful folks that work on the PnP PowerShell module have added three cmdlets that work with Stored Credentials, Add-PnPStoredCredential, Get-PnPStoredCredential, Get-PnPStoredCredential.

image

While the PnP cmdlets themselves have been able to pull credentials directly out of the Credential Store you still needed an external module to pull credentials out for use with other modules, namely the Azure AD and MSOnline modules and the SharePoint Online module. I previously met that need with the Credential Manager module. Let’s see how it looks.

Use the Get-PnPStoredCredential cmdlet to retrieve a stored credential by name. I’ve only had it work if I specify the –Type parameter with the PSCredential value.

$creds = Get-PnPStoredCredential -Name MODAdmin -Type PSCredential

You can output the $creds object to make sure it it grabbed the account you expected. Then you can pass that object to another cmdlet, like Connect-AzureAD and use it to authenticate.

Connect-AzureAD -Credential $creds

Here’s how it looks.

image

I haven’t loaded the Credential Manager module since the stored credential cmdlets showed up in the PnP Module. I already have the PnP module installed everywhere, so it seems unnecessary.

Happy Credential Storing.

tk

ShortURL: https://www.toddklindt.com/PoshMultipleAccountsPnP

  
No presence informationTodd O. Klindt6/17/2019 8:52 AMOffice 365; SPDocKit0 

This is a blog post, about a blog post. Smile I recently published a blog post, “Migrating to Office 365 Checklist” for SysKit and I thought I’d better let all of you, my faithful blog readers know about it too, in case you didn’t see it. SysKit has been publishing a lot of great content in addition to the stuff of mine they’re publishing. Another of my favorites is, “Top 10 Office 365 Best Practices Every Admin Should Know” from Toni Frankola.

Check out my article and let me know what you think.

tk

ShortURL: https://www.toddklindt.com/MigO365Blog

  
No presence informationTodd O. Klindt6/4/2019 4:41 PMPodcast0 

Todd and Shane are back together after a few weeks with one or the other or both being away. They talk about all the cool stuff announced at the SharePoint Conference North America. Then they talk a bit about some of their home networking stuff. Lots of fun content.

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Podcast 433 - CDXXXIII (Into a Dutch Canal) (Time 0_11_09;01)

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Running Time: 49:26

Links:

Microsoft Search
OneDrive Announcements
SharePoint Home Sites
SharePoint On-Prem in Azure IaaS can use SQL PaaS
Working with complex SharePoint Columns in PowerApps
Microsoft Business Application Summit

ShortURL: https://www.toddklindt.com/Podcast433

  
No presence informationTodd O. Klindt6/4/2019 2:42 PMPodcast0 

Todd runs the show by himself this week. Talks about a few recent announcements from members of the PG for SharePoint Online, some fun stuff to help admins with flow, and then he covers a few announcements made at Build. He talks a little more about the Ubiquiti network configuration and how that works and then wraps with some of the community events.

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Podcast 432 - Intimate Podcast (Time 0_20_15;01)

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Running Time: 32:23

Links:

SharePoint Online Can Now Rename Site URLs
Making lists in SharePoint just got easier
Welcome to Microsoft Search
New Fluid Framework
Companion devices to the rescue – Microsoft Teams
Create A Flow That Finds Your Flows
Create A Super Finder Microsoft Flow
SPS Nashville
SPS Charlotte
Microsoft Business Application Summit
PowerScripting Live

ShortURL: https://www.toddklindt.com/Podcast432

  
No presence informationTodd O. Klindt5/13/2019 1:35 PM0 

I can’t believe it’s almost here! The SharePoint Conference 2019 is next week in Las Vegas. If you’re going to be there, and you’d like to hang out here are a couple of events I’ll be at:

Monday May 20th - SharePoint Administrator Day Camp – That joker Shane and I are doing an all-day workshop on SharePoint Administration. There are still seats available. ($500 on top of regular conference registration)

Tuesday May 21st 10:45 – 11:30SysKit Q&A at the SysKit Booth – I’ll be hanging out with my buddies at SysKit chatting about how great Office 365 is, how great the SysKit product line is, and how much we all like chocolate. Swing by, say hi and get some swag.

I’ll also be wandering around spreading good cheer. If you want to catch up email me or tweet me @toddklindt.

See you next week.

tk

ShortURL: https://www.toddklindt.com/SPC2019Meetup

  
No presence informationTodd O. Klindt5/10/2019 10:48 PMPowerShell3 

One of the great things about PowerShell is how easy it is to extend it with modules. The only thing greater is all the modules that are out there. I have a bunch that I use on a daily basis, I couldn’t live without them. But in today’s rapid development cycle it’s easy to get behind on your favorite modules. I wrote this blog post to help people keep up with the Office 365 related PowerShell modules I use, but from what I understand there are other technologies out there with their own suite of modules that people want to keep up with. To help those folks out, I thought I’d share how I keep up to date with my favorite modules.

This method only works with modules that are installed from a repository. If a module has been installed some other way, like with an MSI or EXE you’re out of luck.

The key to this magic is a group of cmdlets that deal with modules, particularly Find-Module and Update-Module. That’s why it only works with modules installed from a repository with Install-Module. To find the relevant cmdlets run:

Get-Command -Noun module

and

Get-Command -Noun InstalledModule

Here’s how I stitch them together to get a list of modules that have updates:

Get-InstalledModule | foreach { $b = (find-module $_.name).version ; if ($b -ne $_.version) { Write-host "$($_.name) has an update from $($_.version) to $b" } }

Let’s break that down.

Get-InstalledModule

Gets all of the modules that have been installed from a repository.

| foreach

Pipes them all l through a foreach loop.

$b = (find-module $_.name).version

Grabs the current published version of the module in the loop.

if ($b -ne $_.version)

Checks to see if the published version is the same as the Version property of the installed module.

{ Write-host "$($_.name) has an update from $($_.version) to $b" }

If they are not equal, it writes out the module name, the installed version, and the current published version.

It looks like this:

image 

In screenshot I ran Get-InstalledModule to show its full output, then the full command and its output.

Now we know which modules can be updated. We can update an individual module like this:

Update-Module SharePointPnPPowerShellOnline –Force

That will update the SharePointPnPPowerShellOnline module and won’t yell at us because it’s replacing an existing one. If the module has been installed with the “AllUsers” scope (the default) you’ll need to run the Update-Module cmdlet in an Administrator prompt.

image 

Now if I run my command it will not report that that the SharePointPnPPowerShellOnline module has an update.

image 

It would be easy to replace the “Write-Host…” part of the command with “Update-Module $_.name” and have it update them automatically. I didn’t do that mainly because the PowerApps modules’ install is a little hinky and requires some extra handholding. If you don’t have them installed, or you want to upgrade them manually first, you could have the command update them automatically.

I hope you’ve found this helpful.

tk

ShortURL: https://www.toddklindt.com/PoshUpdateModules

  
No presence informationTodd O. Klindt5/8/2019 9:09 AMPodcast0 

Todd and Shane are back this week. They start with a few new things in SharePoint, sticky columns and the round-up announcements. There was a lot of talk about cloud security and recent hack announcements. Then they talk about some personal technical challenges with 3D Printing and home networks. Finishing up with the community events and self-promotion.

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Podcast 431 - It's about Time (Time 0_00_41;13)

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Running Time: 1:08:12

Links:

Chris's April Round-Up for SharePoint
Hackers went undetected in Citrix's internal network for six months
Edge Chromium added Chromecasting
Cloud Key Gen 2 Plus
Unifi Security Gateway
8 Port switch with POE
2 x AC LR AP (access points)
SPS Nashville
SPS Charlotte
SharePoint Saturday Atlanta
SharePoint Conference NA
Microsoft Business Application Summit

ShortURL: https://www.toddklindt.com/Podcast431

  
No presence informationTodd O. Klindt5/6/2019 3:08 PMPodcast0 

In this epic episode, Shane and Todd talk about "kids these days" and the effect they are having on everything from how SharePoint is organized to break new cell phones. Maybe not that dramatic but, you get the idea. Google G Suite is made fun of and Todd sets up his new printer. All of that and more. And if you are into Game of Thrones check out the bonus content at the end where the guys talk about episode 2.

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Podcast 430 - Everything is Shared (Time 0_00_26;29)

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Running Time: 1:11:14

Links:

Archive Hub Sites
Google G Suite to Office 365 migration tools
Files restore for SharePoint and Microsoft Teams
Outlook’s Option to End Appointments and Meetings Early
Foldable Phones Fail
PowerApps Attachments
SPS Nashville
SPS Charlotte
SharePoint Saturday Atlanta
SharePoint Conference NA
Microsoft Business Application Summit

ShortURL: https://www.toddklindt.com/Podcast430

  
No presence informationTodd O. Klindt4/24/2019 2:12 PM0 

Shane makes a triumphant return and actually has some things to talk about. Todd and Shane start out talking about their recent travels and fun. They do have some good technical content around PowerApps, Edge, and Office 365, then they have some discussion about how they got to watch Game of Thrones (no spoilers) and some other fun new personal technology. After the show they stick around and talk about the actual GOT premier, there are spoilers, stop before that if you don't want the spoilers!

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Podcast 429 - Pro Gravity Stance (Time 1_23_17;12)

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Running Time: 1:12:49

Links:

PowerApps - The smallest feature
New renewable Office 365 developer subscriptions
Creating and Deploying a Custom Theme in SharePoint Online
Configure modern search results to search all of your organization (rather than the current site)
PowerApps Components Intro Video
SPS Nashville
SPS Charlotte
SharePoint Saturday Atlanta
SharePoint Conference NA
Microsoft Business Application Summit

ShortURL: https://www.toddklindt.com/Podcast429

  
No presence informationTodd O. Klindt4/22/2019 9:37 AMPodcast0 

Todd is flying solo this week and loving it. He talks about the fun he had in Europe at SEF and he waxes nostalgically about March 2019 being the 10th anniversary of the podcast. He wraps by talking about PowerShell, Teams, and a new, way to provision test sites to see what Office 365 can do.

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Podcast 428 - Poorly Made and Askew (Time 0_06_48;16)

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Running Time: 38:00

Links:

Office 365 PowerShell Module Installs
Free Office 365 Groups Webinar with SysKit
PowerShell talk for the Utah UG
Officers respond to a burglary call with their guns drawn only to find a trapped Roomba
Explore SharePoint designs with the preview of the SharePoint Provisioning Service
New Teams functionality
SharePoint Page Performance—Why Does It Matter?
SPS Nashville Call for Speakers
SPS Charlotte
SharePoint Conference NA
ECS

ShortURL: https://www.toddklindt.com/Podcast428

  
No presence informationTodd O. Klindt4/10/2019 8:33 AMPodcast0 

Marc joins Todd this week as they discuss all the traveling they've both done over the last weeks. They also talk about Todd's new Surface Go, new Dev stuff that Marc's all excited about, how important SharePoint documentation can be.

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Podcast 427 - The Bottom of the Barrel! (Time 0_02_50;22)

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Running Time: 51:34

Links:

OneDrive and SharePoint Content Team job opening
SharePoint Dev Open Source
Office Dev PnP
How SharePoint Farm Documentation Can Save Your Neck
SysKit Blog
SPS Nashville Call for Speakers
SPS Charlotte
SharePoint Conference NA
ECS

ShortURL: https://www.toddklindt.com/Podcast427

  
No presence informationTodd O. Klindt4/1/2019 3:00 AMOffice 365; PowerShell1 

One of the first things I do when I set up a new machine is install all of the PowerShell modules I need to manage Office 365. Since there are so many different modules, and they update so often, I put them all in this blog post so you (and I) have one place to go to to grab them I’ll. I’ll also keep the versions updated so you’ll know if you need to update them.

For each of the modules I have listed the official page if there is one, and a PowerShell command you can run to install it from the PowerShell Gallery.

To see which modules you have installed and which version they are run this:

Get-InstalledModule | select name, version

To suppress the warning you get when installing from the PowerShell Gallery, run this:

Set-PSRepository -Name PSGallery -InstallationPolicy Trusted

To update to latest version of a module use the Update-Module cmdlet. You can use the technique in this blog post, PowerShell to Update your PowerShell Modules​​, to see which version you have and whether it's the latest. 

Official Microsoft Modules

Sign-in assistant (needed for MSOL and AzureAD Modules)

Microsoft Online (1.1.183.17)
Original Tenant Directory Management
Prefix: MSOL
Install-Module -Name MSOnline

AzureAD (2.0.2.16)
Newer Tenant Directory Management
Prefix: AzureAD
Install-Module azuread

AzureADPreview (2.0.2.27)
Latest Tenant Directory Management
Prefix: AzureAD
Install-Module -Name AzureADPreview

SharePoint Online (16.0.9021.1201)
Manage SharePoint sites and related services
Prefix: SPO
Install-Module -Name Microsoft.Online.SharePoint.PowerShell

Teams
Microsoft Teams Management Preview (0.9.6) ​
(uses Graph beta/preview APIs)
Prefix: Team
Install-Module -Name MicrosoftTeams -RequiredVersion 0.9.6

Microsoft Teams Management (1.0)
(uses 1.0 Graph API)
 
Prefix: Team 
Install-Module -Name MicrosoftTeams

Skype for Business  
(No PowerShell module install from Gallery)

Exchange Online
(No local install)

Flow and PowerApps (1.0.7 & 2.0.4) 
Flow and PowerApps management 

Prefix: No Prefix (Boooo!)
Install-Module -Name Microsoft.PowerApps.PowerShell
Install-Module -Name
Microsoft.PowerApps.Administration.PowerShell –AllowClobber
(First module works for user, add the second module for Admin management cmdlets)

3rd Party Installs

SharePoint PnP PowerShell (3.11.1907.0)
Essential to manage SharePoint and related technologies
Install-Module SharePointPnPPowerShellOnline

Credential Manager (2.0)
Used to create and retrieve Windows Stored Credentials
Install-Module credentialmanager

Last Updated 7/3/2019

I hope this comes in handy. Let me know if there are any other modules I should consider adding.

tk

ShortUrl: https://www.toddklindt.com/POSHOffice365Modules

  
No presence informationTodd O. Klindt3/27/2019 8:13 AMPodcast0 

Without Todd to keep Shane on point this became the Flow show. Jon Levesque, Microsoft Flow Evangelist, joined Shane in the most epic discussion of Flow ever. Don't fret though Jon kept Shane from messing it up too much. Enjoy

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Podcast 426 - Going with the Flow (Time 0_42_30;09)

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Running Time: 45:53

Links:

Setting up OneDrive Folder Protection
Quite Mouse
Connected web parts for SharePoint Online
Flow endpoint allows you to send a message in Teams
SVG Tutorial
Microsoft will stop updating Windows 7
Twilio
Collab with LinkedIn connections
North American Collab Summit
Omaha PowerApps and Flow class
SEF 2019
SharePoint Conference NA

ShortURL: https://www.toddklindt.com/Podcast426

  
No presence informationTodd O. Klindt3/25/2019 9:11 AM0 

When Microsoft introduced Office 365 Groups, (also known as “Unified Groups” and “What? more Groups??”) a few years ago there was much confusion. The name is confusing, as there are already about 16 different kinds of groups in the Windows and Office 365 world, and what they do is even more confusing, if that’s possible.

On April 16th I’ll be doing a free Webinar with the folks at SysKit where I’ll explain what Groups are, how best to use them, and I’ll even throw in some administrative goodies at no extra charge.

You can register here for the webinar. The webinar itself is free. If you want to heckle, that costs an extra $10. I hear it’s money well spent. Smile

tk

ShortURL: https://www.toddklindt.com/SysKitGroupsWebinar

  
No presence informationTodd O. Klindt3/12/2019 5:40 PMPodcast0 
  
No presence informationTodd O. Klindt3/5/2019 4:19 PMPodcast0 

Todd is on his own this week. After he finishes celebrating Shane not being there he talks about Azure AD Connect and how you can make it more secure, how to use the PnP PowerShell with SharePoint Server 2019, and how to make Windows 10 smaller. He finishes up showing off his new Surface Go.

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Podcast 424 - Pulls and Pushes Go in the Wrong Direction (Time 0_22_05;28)

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Running Time: 39:42

Links:

Azure AD Connect for Red Teamers
PnP PowerShell has a version for SharePoint 2019
Share Point DSC
Windows 10 Debloater
Why I attended SPTechCon Austin 2019
Surface Go
USB C hub
Slate Money Podcast
SharePoint Saturday Kansas City
PowerApps and Flow Training
North American Collab Summit
SharePoint Saturday Omaha
SEF 2019
SharePoint Conference NA

ShortURL: https://www.toddklindt.com/Podcast424

  
No presence informationTodd O. Klindt3/4/2019 11:02 AMPodcast0 

Todd and Shane start out talking about some gotchas that recently happened with Teams and patches. Then they talk about some SQL and PowerApps and Flow fun. Wrapping up with some good tidbits about OneNote and Modern vs. Classic before giving a shout to the fan of the week: Bonne Springer.

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Podcast 423 - I Like it When I Like it (Time 0_00_06;00)

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Running Time: 55:33

Links:

10:34 Critical regression in February 2019 CU for SharePoint 2016
14:10 SQL Decimal and Numeric are the same column
15:00 SQL Column Definitions
20:06 PowerApps components
33:01 How to Send Emails to OneNote
40:25 Fan of the week, Bonne Springer
50:54 SharePoint Saturday Kansas City
51:00 PowerApps and Flow Training
51:10 North American Collab Summit
51:20 SharePoint Saturday Omaha
51:30 SEF 2019
51:40 SharePoint Conference NA

ShortURL: https://www.toddklindt.com/Podcast423

  
No presence informationTodd O. Klindt2/20/2019 4:28 PMPodcast0 

Todd and Shane are back this week talking about their SPTechCon experience and why that's still a great conference to attend. Todd unboxes some classic technology that we all remember fondly and then they talk about a lot of PowerShell fun. Wrapping up with some discussion about SharePoint and Office 365 versus Office 2019 discussion.

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Podcast 422 - Rained Scooters (Time 0_26_15;07)

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Running Time: 45:47

Links:

15:06 Don't use Write-Debug
20:17 SharePoint Page Performance—Why Does It Matter?
26:54 Office 356 vs Office 2019
27:00 Move to monthly release
32:47 The perils of using Internet Explorer as your default browser
SharePoint Saturday Kansas City
SPTechCon Austin 2019
North American Collab Summit
SharePoint Saturday Omaha
SEF 2019
SharePoint Conference NA

ShortURL: https://www.toddklindt.com/Podcast422

  
No presence informationTodd O. Klindt2/18/2019 2:54 PMPodcast0 

Todd and Shane are back this week and start with mentioning some needs you might have for those chilly offices that you work in. Then they move on to discussing how DNS can affect everything, including getting into your SharePoint Online site. They also talk about some announcements of things coming to SharePoint Online and OneDrive for Business. Wrapping up with Shane's moral dilemma over his Yeti repair process. They end the show with the community events where you can find them in the next few months.

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Podcast 421 - We're Idiots (Time 0_24_25;16)

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Running Time: 53:42

Links:

06:00 Foot warmer
17:50 January 2019 SharePoint Modernization News
25:03 A new mass delete notification is coming to SharePoint Online and OneDrive for Business
26:00 How to Keep up with Office 365 Changes
26:30 Bulk Undelete Files in Office 365 and SharePoint Online with PnP PowerShell
33:07 Organize your site navigation with SharePoint megamenus
34:00 6 tips to get mega value from the new megamenu navigation for SharePoint
36:06 PowerApps Tabbed Forms
SharePoint Saturday Kansas City
SPTechCon Austin 2019
North American Collab Summit
SharePoint Saturday Omaha
SEF 2019
SharePoint Conference NA

ShortURL: https://www.toddklindt.com/Podcast421

  
No presence informationTodd O. Klindt2/5/2019 4:33 PMPodcast0 

For the second week in a row Shane joins Todd to talk about things. They start out with a little non-technical stuff reading the card for Todd's birthday charity drive and then talking about purchasing office chairs. Then they move into a lot of technical talk around the Office 365 Issues, managing data gateways, Modern vs. Classic, Teams, Groups, SharePoint lists, and even a little Dropbox before wrapping up with the community events and appearances.

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Podcast 420 - Enhance Your Calm (Time 0_20_16;00)

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Running Time: 51:16

Links:

On-premises data gateway management in the Power platform admin center
Modern vs. Classic and the change
The Secret Algorithm Behind Learning
New Teams documentation
Managing Microsoft Groups in Office 365 to Avoid Potential Group Sprawl
Dropbox to Acquire E-Signature Software Company HelloSign
SharePoint Lists getting cooler and cooler
SharePoint Saturday Kansas City
SPTechCon Austin 2019
North American Collab Summit
SharePoint Saturday Omaha
SEF 2019
SharePoint Conference NA

ShortURL: https://www.toddklindt.com/Podcast420

  
No presence informationTodd O. Klindt1/28/2019 2:06 PMPodcast0 

Shane decides to rejoin the podcast today. Todd starts off talking about the success of the Birthday Charity Drive. Then Shane and Todd spend a lot of time talking about PnP PowerShell templates and the awesome things coming out of that team. Then they talk a little about some cool stuff announced for PowerApps and related technology. Wrapping up with a tale of woe about Shane's Tesla and some great upcoming events in the community.

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Podcast 419 - My Tootsies are Cold (Time 0_16_16;20)

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Running Time: 51:59

Links:

21:16 PowerApps shipped some new UI and CDS functionality
26:45 PowerApps Azure Blob Storage
34:10 PowerApps and Flow Training
48:34 SharePoint Saturday Kansas City
48:54 SPTechCon Austin 2019
48:55 North American Collab Summit
48:56 SharePoint Saturday Omaha
48:57 SEF 2019
48:58 SharePoint Conference NA

ShortURL: https://www.toddklindt.com/Podcast419

  
No presence informationTodd O. Klindt1/28/2019 8:28 AMPodcast0 

Todd invites Marc Anderson to join today while Shane is off gallivanting. Marc and Todd talk about the announcement around classic lists and then a few site design articles and tools for SharePoint. Then they start talking about some of the Patterns and Practices releases for both developers and admin-type folks. They wrap up with a rundown of a lot of community events where you might find them and some good knowledge in the coming months.

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Podcast 418 - I'm a Teapot (Time 0_04_25;19)

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Running Time: 58:30

Links:

1:00 HTTP 418
08:04 Charity
16:11 Tenant setting for classis lists/libraries going away on April 1
17:00 SharePoint Modernization Scanner
20:28 THE ULTIMATE GUIDE TO SHAREPOINT SITE DESIGNS AND SITE SCRIPTS
20:29 https://www.sitedesigner.io
20:30 https://sptools.netlify.com
25:00 View and apply site designs from within a SharePoint site
30:12 Office 365 CLI release 1/14 v1.13.0
39:31 PnPJS
39:32 Reusable React controls for your SharePoint Framework solutions
39:33 Reusable property pane controls for the SharePoint Framework solutions
39:34 PnP SPFx Yeoman Generator
52:16 Collab 365 monthly virtual conferences - see re: PowerApps
54:46 SPTechCon Austin 2019
54:47 North American Collab Summit
54:48 SharePoint Saturday Omaha
54:49 SEF 2019
54:50 SharePoint Conference NA
54:51 European Collaboration Summit 2019

ShortURL: https://www.toddklindt.com/Podcast418

  
No presence informationTodd O. Klindt1/22/2019 8:30 AM0 

Here in the US there is currently a government shutdown and a lot of workers are furloughed. One of them recently reached out to me with resume, looking for some work to tide him over until he can go back to work. This got me thinking about what I could do to help. Sadly, not a lot. I can, though, offer some training or consulting to IT workers that have suddenly found themselves with some time on their hands.

If you’re a furloughed US Government worker, and would like one hour of free SharePoint, Office 365, or PowerShell training, or just want to hang for an hour, email me at furlough@toddklindt.com. We’ll work out a time and some topics.

Now, hopefully this will all be resolved soon and no one will be able to take me up on my offer. Smile

tk

ShortURL: https://www.toddklindt.com/Furlough

  
No presence informationTodd O. Klindt1/9/2019 4:42 PMPodcast0 
  
No presence informationTodd O. Klindt1/8/2019 2:48 PM0 

In this episode, the guys spend a good bit of time talking about PowerShell instead of Todd's New Year's vacation. Almost shocking how well they stayed on topic. They also discuss WeMos, how it took Shane four hours to get it working, and how Shane feels it wasn't his fault but the wireless's fault. Updating Office 365 to Monthly update cadence, Surface Laptop 2, and Todd's love of OneDrive round out the show. Not too bad and no stupid New Year's resolutions so you can safely listen.

Audio File

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Podcast 416 - 30 Second Skip (Time 0_34_58;03)

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Running Time: 54:23

Links:

Pause Syncing with PowerShell
Help me pause OneDrive Sync with PowerShell
Change your Office update cadence
How to Enable Windows Sandbox
WeMo Mini Smart Plug
PowerApps and Flow Training
SPTechCon Austin 2019
North American Collab Summit
SharePoint Saturday Omaha
SharePoint Conference NA

ShortURL: https://www.toddklindt.com/Podcast416

  
No presence informationTodd O. Klindt1/4/2019 11:37 AMPowerShell0 

I recently had to do some testing for a customer on a Windows 10 machine whose primary language was not English. I, having lived in the midwest United States my entire life, do not speak any other languages fluently. The customer anticipated this and sent along a very thorough set of directions, complete with pictures, of how to switch the language to English for me. Very kind of them indeed. As I looked through the directions the thought occurred to me, “I’ll probably need to do this a few times. I wonder if I can automate it. I bet I can! PowerShell to the rescue!”

Here’s the TL;DR of what I ran:

Set-Culture en-US
Set-WinSystemLocale en-US
Set-WinHomeLocation 0xF4
Set-WinUILanguageOverride en-US

logoff

None of it takes place until you log back in, so I added the logoff at the end.

With PowerShell, knowing the answer is good, but knowing how to get the answer is even better. One of my friends, Jeff Hicks, always does a good job explaining the process of find things in PowerShell, so I thought I’d do that here.

I had the steps, in UI form, so I didn’t need to figure that out. There were 4 things that needed to be changed. I just needed to figure out how to make those changes with PowerShell. I went to a PowerShell prompt and typed:

Get-Help language

hoping PowerShell could nudge m in the right direction. I got this back:

image

It wasn’t exactly what I needed, but it did show me there was a module, International, that was probably a good place to start. And knowing that I needed to change things, I was mostly interested in the Set cmdlets. There were also a couple of good help topics, about_Language_Keywords and about_Language_Modes that I could reference if I got stuck. My next step was to see what other cmdlets were in the International module. I did that with Get-Command -Module International. That filled in the blanks for me.

image

For the pieces that didn’t obviously connect to the pictures I had from the customer’s instruction I had some Get cmdlets above to poke around and try to match values. My next hour or so consisted of running the different Get cmdlets and figuring out where the current setting was so I could use the appropriate Set cmdlet to change it. I made liberal use of the help cmdletname –examples paradigm to figure out what the parameter values should be.

After I was finished and was searching to see if I was right I found this Technet article,

How to change display language in Windows 10, that confirmed what I was doing was correct. My script is laser focused on what I was doing, that one is more useful and generic. If you want to understand this more, read through that script.

That’s all there was to it. I can’t reboot the client machine but all of these changes have persisted multiple logouts. I did also have to use the CHCP command to change the code page of the PowerShell window. That did not persist across logins. I think there’s a way to set the default code page in the Registry, but I haven’t chased that down yet.

tk

ShortURL: https://www.toddklindt.com/PoshChangeLanguage

  
No presence informationTodd O. Klindt1/2/2019 9:23 AM0 

OneDrive and PowerShell. They remind me of that song, My Favorite Things. Though I’m not sure which I like more, PowerShell or whiskers on kittens. It’s a close call.

I write a lot of little PowerShell scripts to help me get through the day, and often those scripts fiddle with files that are being synced with OneDrive. In a few cases, if the file is large enough, my PowerShell script will fail because OneDrive will lock the file while it’s syncing it. Both responses are totally understandable. I want PowerShell to stop if it can’t sync a file, and I want OneDrive to sync files when I expect it to. I could, and I have in some cases, written a bunch of PowerShell to check the lock status of a file, to deal with the locking issues that OneDrive creates, and so on. It’s tedious though, and honestly I’m not very good at it. That’s where you all come in…

What I really want, nay, need, is a way to pause OneDrive sync while I’m messing with files I know it will lock when syncing. I need two things, Stop-OneDriveSync and Start-OneDriveSync. That’s it. I asked Santa for them for Christmas, but all I got was socks.

So I took the next step, I whined on Twitter. Someone, suggested I create a UserVoice for it. I thought that was pretty solid advice, so I did.

Pause Syncing with PowerShell

What I’m asking from you, is if you too would like to be able to start and stop OneDrive syncing from PowerShell, please vote up the UserVoice. Here it is again in case you missed it. Smile

Pause Syncing with PowerShell

I’ll be keeping an eye on it, and I’ll know if you voted!

Thanks in advance.

tk

ShortURL: https://www.toddklindt.com/PoshPauseOneDrive

  
No presence informationTodd O. Klindt12/27/2018 3:23 PMPodcast0 

Todd and Shane come back from the holidays and talk about some actual technical content for SharePoint Web Parts. Then they discuss some survey results for Teams and changes in licensing for parts of Office 365. They also talk about installing hardware with no drivers and some fun birthday charity updates.

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Podcast 415 - Brain Shut Off (Time 0_21_13;28)

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Running Time: 51:47

Links:

New SharePoint Web Parts
Teams passes up Slack
UPDATED - Updates to Microsoft Flow and PowerApps for Office 365
Information architecture in a flat SharePoint world
Package Thief vs. Glitter Bomb Trap
PowerApps and Flow Training
SPTechCon Austin 2019
North American Collab Summit
SharePoint Saturday Omaha
SharePoint Conference NA

ShortURL: https://www.toddklindt.com/Podcast415

  
No presence informationTodd O. Klindt12/27/2018 3:16 PMPodcast0 

In this episode, even though Lori wasn’t there to supervise, the boys did a decent job of staying on topic. Maybe Lori is really the problem? In traditional fashion Todd starts off talking about a blog post he wrote on Office 365 group permissions and then some other fun about making SharePoint look nicer. Then Shane chimes in with his needs for a new laptop and reminds you how to fix SharePoint Workflow patches. Finally, they end with something interesting, talking about all of the events you can meet Shane at. A must listen!

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Podcast 414 - Never Spend all of that Money (Time 0_11_10;28)

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Running Time: 49:15

Links:

Copying Office 365 Group Permissions with PowerShell
New no code solutions for custom formatting in SharePoint
Modernize your SharePoint pages
Remove Background from Photos
PowerApps and Flow App in A Day
PowerApps and Flow Training
SPTechCon Austin 2019
North American Collab Summit
SharePoint Conference NA

ShortURL: https://www.toddklindt.com/Podcast414

  
No presence informationTodd O. Klindt12/18/2018 3:46 PMPowerShell; Office 3650 

Office 365 Groups, or “Unified Groups” to their friends, have been a confusing Office 365 feature from an administrative perspective for as long as they’ve been around. Users can create them all willy-nilly (unless you disable that), the SharePoint sites they create don’t show up in the SharePoint Admin Center (until you use the new one), the list goes on and on. Another frustrating part of Groups is that you can’t do any nesting, of any kind. You can’t put a Unified Group in an Azure AD Security Group, or vice versa. You can’t put a SharePoint Group in a Unified Group either. Because of these limitations it’s very tough to reuse group membership. You can’t create an HR Azure AD Security Group and drop it into the HR Benefits Unified Group or the HR Hiring Unified Group. Now, the obvious question is, “If these two Unified Groups have the same membership why are they two groups instead of one?” Good question, fair reader. Sometimes it just works out that way. Sometimes the AD Security Group would only be a subset of the users in the Unified Group in question. Regardless, this question came up on a customer call and I was challenged to find a way to ease the administrative burden of manually adding the same users to multiple Unified Groups. What was my answer, “Of course I can do it, with PowerShell!” Sometimes I answer without thinking first.

I had used the PnP PowerShell in the past to get a list of all of the Unified Groups in a tenant, so I was pretty sure it could be done. I whipped out Get-Command and listed all the cmdlets that contained the noun “UnifiedGroup.”

Get-Command -Noun *unifiedgroup*

That exposed two cmdlets I’d need: Get-PnPUnifiedGroupOwners and Get-PnPUnifiedGroupMembers. That’s good. But there were no corresponding “Set” cmdlets. That’s bad. Normally this is where I’d panic. Instead, I took a deep breath and instead of panicking, I typed Get-Command -ParameterName members. Low and behold, Get-Command blessed me with New-PnPUnifiedGroup and Set-PnPUnifiedGroup. We retrieve the list of Members with Get-PnPUnifiedGroupMembers but we set them with Set-PnPUnifiedGroup –Members. Not totally consistent, but I can work with that.

From past experience I knew I had to be connected to the Microsoft Graph to use the Unified Group cmdlets, so  I authenticated against the Graph so I could start poking around.

Connect-PnPOnline –Graph

If you haven’t connected to the Graph before, hold onto your hats. It’s different than what you’re used to. You’ll be given a code to register with the Graph that allows the PnP to query it. It feels weird, but everything is working correctly.

Once I was connected to the Graph I ran Get-PnPUnifiedGroupMembers to see what the output looked like. It gave me back a collection of objects that corresponded to the users that were members of that Unified Group. Fair enough.

image

We can store them in a variable for use later. Now, how do we assign membership? help Set-PnPUnifiedGroup –Examples didn’t provide a lot of help. It only showed adding a single Owner. But it did show me that the cmdlet was expecting the parameter to be a string, and that string needed to be the UPN of the user I wanted to add. I can work with that too.

The mechanics of saving out the list of users and owners and assigning them to another group was a little tricky, but not bad. I walked through the output of Get- and wrote the UPNs of each object to a new collection that I would then pass on to Set-. It looks like this:

$members = Get-PnPUnifiedGroupMembers -Identity $source

$members | ForEach-Object -begin  {$memberlist  = @() } -process {$memberlist += $($_.UserPrincipalName) }

Set-PnPUnifiedGroup -Identity $destination -Members $memberlist -Owners $ownerlist

The only sticking point was that doing it that way would overwrite whatever Members or Owners the Destination Group already had. To handle that I created a boolean variable, $mergeusers, that I could set to $true or $false depending on whether I wanted to clobber the existing users or not. If I did not want to clobber them I used the following code to merge the current Members of Destination with the Members of Source:

$membersDest = Get-PnPUnifiedGroupMembers -Identity $destination

$members = $members + $membersDest

Then later when I write the users in $members to the Destination Group it has both sets of Members.

I added some very, very simple error handling so that another human has a chance of running it. This is what I ended up with:

# Set some values
# use Get-PnPUnifiedGroup to get Unified Group names
# Name of Unified Group whose owners and membership we want to copy
$source = "Regulations"

# Name of Unified Group whose owners and membership we want to populate
$destination = "Empty"

# Whether to overwrite Destination membership or merge them
$mergeusers = $false

# Check to see if PnP Module is loaded
$pnploaded = Get-Module SharePointPnPPowerShellOnline
if ($pnploaded -eq $false) {
    Write-Host "Please load the PnP PowerShell and run again"
    Write-Host "install-module SharePointPnPPowerShellOnline"
    break
    }
# PnP Module is loaded

# Check to see if user is connected to Microsoft Graph
try
{
    $owners = Get-PnPUnifiedGroupOwners -Identity $source
}
catch [System.InvalidOperationException]
{
    Write-Host "No connection to Microsoft Graph found"  -BackgroundColor Black -ForegroundColor Red
    Write-Host "No Azure AD connection, please connect first with Connect-PnPOnline -Graph" -BackgroundColor Black -ForegroundColor Red
break
}
catch [System.ArgumentNullException]
{
        Write-Host "Group not found"  -BackgroundColor Black -ForegroundColor Red
        Write-Host "Verify connection to Azure AD with Connect-PnPOnline -Graph" -BackgroundColor Black -ForegroundColor Red
        Write-Host "Use Get-PnPUnifiedGroup to get Unified Group names"  -BackgroundColor Black -ForegroundColor Red
        break
}
catch
{
    Write-Host "Some other error"   -BackgroundColor Black -ForegroundColor Red
break
}

$members = Get-PnPUnifiedGroupMembers -Identity $source

if ($mergeusers -eq $true) {
     # Get existing owners and members of Destination so that we can combine them
    $ownersDest = Get-PnPUnifiedGroupOwners -Identity $destination
    $membersDest = Get-PnPUnifiedGroupMembers -Identity $destination

    # Add the two lists together so we don't overwrite any existing owners or members in Destination
    $owners = $owners + $ownersDest
    $members = $members + $membersDest
    }

# Set the owners and members of Destination
$owners | ForEach-Object -begin  {$ownerlist  = @() } -process {$ownerlist += $($_.UserPrincipalName) }
$members | ForEach-Object -begin  {$memberlist  = @() } -process {$memberlist += $($_.UserPrincipalName) }

Set-PnPUnifiedGroup -Identity $destination -Members $memberlist -Owners $ownerlist

Feel free to pick through that for any nuggets that might help you.

Happy copying.

tk

ShortURL: https://www.toddklindt.com/PoshCopyO365GroupMembers

  
No presence informationTodd O. Klindt12/18/2018 2:21 PMPodcast0 

In this week's episode, Todd tells us all about his European travel woes. Then he tells about some blog posts and patches that are happening. Shane tells about some training and videos he's made for PowerApps and Flow. They wrap up with some of the upcoming big events you'll want to attend.

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Podcast 413 - Payload is Too Big (Time 0_47_15;21)

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Running Time: 48:19

Links:

SysKit Security Manager
Bulk Undelete Files in Office 365 and SharePoint Online with PnP PowerShell
PowerApps Tooltip
PowerApps create a PDF from SharePoint List data
SPTechCon Austin 2019
North American Collab Summit
SharePoint Conference NA

ShortURL: https://www.toddklindt.com/Podcast413

  
No presence informationTodd O. Klindt12/11/2018 5:39 PMOffice 365; PowerShell6 

Quite often as a consultant, you get to work on truly fun and funny situations. The customer email that prompted this blog post is one of them.

My contact at the customer site emailed with a problem. A few weeks earlier one of their users deleted some pictures from one of their document libraries. Okay, not a few pictures, nearly 100,000 of them. And not only had that user deleted nearly 100,000 items, they hadn’t told anyone for 3 weeks, while they tried to upload the pictures they still had locally. I know what you’re saying, this is a job for the Recycle Bin! And you’re right, it is, but the other factors made it complicated. They couldn’t just restore all of the files in the Recycle Bin as there were also 3 weeks’ worth of legitimately deleted documents in there, including documents from that user. Also, since the user had re-uploaded a bunch of the deleted documents there would be “overwrite” prompts all over that would slow down the process. And let’s not forget that even if it all went smoothly, someone would have to manually restore nearly 100,000 files. No easy feat.

The customer talked to me because they wanted to share the story (it was a big funny after the fact) but also because they knew I always said that PowerShell could do anything. They were hoping PowerShell could bale them out of this mess too. I don’t mean to spoil the end of this story, but they were right, it could.

My tool of choice when it comes to making magic in Office 365 is the PnP PowerShell. I had never done this before, so I had to do a bit of spelunking. I ran Get-Command *recycle* -Module SharePointPnPPowerShellOnline to see what PowerShell cmdlets availed themselves to me.  Looky, looky, there it is, Restore-PnPRecycleBinItem. Did you just hear angels sing? I know I did.

Now we needed to weave a little PowerShell magic. We couldn’t restore all of the deleted files, since other folks had legitimately deleted files in the meantime. We also only wanted to restore .JPG files that this user had deleted. Here’s command that got the files we needed:

Get-PnPRecycleBinItem | Where-Object -Property Leafname -Like -Value "*.jpg"  | Where-Object -Property Dirname -Like -Value "Shared Documents/*"  | Where-Object -Property DeletedByEmail -EQ –Value shane@tkdemo.com

That returned all the files, now what to do with them? Restore them, of course. This bit of code grabs all the files, counts them as it restores them, then spits out the time and date when it’s done.

$bin = Get-PnPRecycleBinItem | Where-Object -Property Leafname -Like -Value "*.jpg"  | Where-Object -Property Dirname -Like -Value "Shared Documents/*"  | Where-Object -Property DeletedByEmail -EQ –Value shane@tkdemo.com

$bin | foreach  -begin { $a = 0} -Process  {Write-Host "$a - $($_.LeafName)" ; $_ | Restore-PnPRecycleBinItem -Force ; $a++ } -End { Get-Date }

Normally, that would have worked, but it was going to take some time to restore the files. A loooong time. Several days in fact. With some testing I surmised that the client PowerShell was the bottleneck. I used a little PowerShell trick to break the entire 100,000 item collection into chunks of 10,000 and run it multiple PowerShell windows and on multiple machines. I changed the second line to look something like this:

($bin[20001..30000]) | foreach  -begin { $a = 0} -Process  {Write-Host "$a - $($_.LeafName)" ; $_ | Restore-PnPRecycleBinItem -Force ; $a++ } -End { Get-Date }

The $bin[20001..30000] only sends items 20001 to 30000 of the collection down the pipeline. I changed that on each client. $bin[0..10000], $bin[10001..20000], and so on. After they finished I ran through it all one more time to make sure I didn’t miss any. The entire script looked like this:

# Make sure necessary modules are installed
# PnP PowerShell to get access to Office 365
Install-Module SharePointPnPPowerShellOnline

# Module to securely store passwords
Install-Module CredentialManager

# Saved credentials
New-StoredCredential -Target "ImportantSite" -UserName
madowner@tkdemo.com -Password 'Password goes here' -Persist LocalMachine

# Now the actual meat
# Connect to the site collection where the files were deleted
Connect-PnPOnline -Url
https://tkdemo.sharepoint.com/ -Credentials ImportantSite

# Filter the recycle bin for only the files we want to restore, JPGs, from the Shared document library, deleted by Shane
$bin = Get-PnPRecycleBinItem | Where-Object -Property Leafname -Like -Value "*.jpg"  | Where-Object -Property Dirname -Like -Value "Shared Documents/*"  | Where-Object -Property DeletedByEmail -EQ -Value
shane@tkdemo.com

# See how many pictures Shane deleted.
$bin.count

# Walk through the collection and restore each document. Spit out the time at the end so you know how long it took. Also keep a counter to see how it’s going as it churns through the collection
$bin | foreach  -begin { $a = 0} -Process  {Write-Host "$a - $($_.LeafName)" ; $_ | Restore-PnPRecycleBinItem -Force ; $a++ } -End { Get-Date }

# Since the OM is the bottleneck you can run this on multiple machines to speed things up. Here’s how to only restore a subset of the collection
($bin[20001..30000]) | foreach  -begin { $a = 0} -Process  {Write-Host "$a - $($_.LeafName)" ; $_ | Restore-PnPRecycleBinItem -Force ; $a++ } -End { Get-Date }

I hope you never need to use this. Smile

tk

ShortURL: https://www.toddklindt.com/PoshRestoreSPOFiles

  
No presence informationTodd O. Klindt12/10/2018 10:43 AMPodcast0 

Todd has left the podcast for the day and Shane brings in a guest. Troy from AppRiver. They discuss security and hacking. Troy talks about what kinds of things the bad guys are doing and what organizations and individuals can do to help protect against those things. Things even the technically challenged could do. Shane then tells us about community and upcoming events.

Audio File

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Podcast 412 - Preconditioned Fail (Time 0_11_50;25)

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Running Time: 39:56

Links:

SysKit Security Manager
Information architecture in a flat SharePoint world
Creating PDFs from SharePoint Data
Online Free Flow Conference
Thrive Conference 2018
SP Fest Chicago
SPTechCon Austin 2019
North American Collab Summit
SharePoint Conference NA

ShortURL: https://www.toddklindt.com/Podcast412

  
No presence informationTodd O. Klindt12/5/2018 2:59 AMPodcast0 

Shane and Todd spend time this week talking about some tech toys Shane has bought over the years including a Ring doorbell, new Wi-Fi APs, and a really big monitor. They also discuss some fun PowerShell topics, and what they wear when they work from home.

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Podcast 411 - You're Not Going to Like This (Time 0_03_49;18)

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Running Time: 50:48

Links:

SysKit Security Manager
What’s the Recommended Editor for PowerShell Scripts?
PowerShell support for PowerApps (preview)EXPLORING THE POWERSHELL ALTERNATIVE TO NETSTAT
What to Wear to Work—When You Work at Home
Online Free Flow Conference
Thrive Conference 2018
SP Fest Chicago
SPS Coimbatore
SPTechCon Austin 2019
North American Collab Summit
SharePoint Conference NA

ShortURL: https://www.toddklindt.com/Podcast411

  
No presence informationTodd O. Klindt11/16/2018 8:41 AMPodcast0 

Marc Anderson joins Todd this week while Shane is teaching a class. They talk about a problem that has crept into the PnP PowerShell and how to fix it. Marc talks about some developery topics like the new SPFX release and the Office 365 CLI. They also discuss how Microsoft is improving the experience of having multiple accounts, and how AutoSave is great, but you have to keep your eye on it.

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Podcast 410 - Literally No One Wants That (Time 0_02_59;11)

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Running Time: 59:02

Links:

Getting a “Method not found” Error when using PnP PowerShell
Office 365 CLI
Azure portal and the new account manager!
How Broken Are Office 365 SharePoint Permissions?
SPFx 1.7
SharePoint Framework v1.7.0 - What's in the latest update of SPFx?
AutoSave in Office 365: Search Implications
PowerApps and Flow Training
Thrive Conference 2018
SP Fest Chicago
SPS Coimbatore
SPTechCon Austin 2019
North American Collab Summit
SharePoint Conference NA

ShortURL: https://www.toddklindt.com/Podcast410

  
No presence informationTodd O. Klindt11/13/2018 3:22 PMPowerShell; Office 365; Sharepoint0 

This question has come up a few times so I thought I’d blog it so I had an easy place to point people. You can also go to the PnP PowerShell GitHub Comments for the same information.

If you’ve watched any of my podcasts, or seen me speak at any technical events you know I’m a big fan of the Patterns and Practices (PnP) PowerShell cmdlets. They make working with Office 365 tolerable, even enjoyable. The PnP PowerShell is a community led, Microsoft supervised, project on GitHub. If you’re not already using it, you should check it out.

Along with scads of other software running on our machines, it gets updated once a month or so. In the last couple of months a couple of clashing updates have caused PnP users some stress. Specifically when they use the Connect-PnPOnline cmdlet to connect to SharePoint Online they get a “Method not found” error message. The PnP team was on it. They published this fix:

  1. Delete all the SharePoint Components from the Control Panel (Add/Remove)
  2. Open the GAC location (C:\windows\Microsoft.NET\assembly\GAC_MSIL), search for the term SharePoint and delete all the folders. (This is required since the reference is still old which is used by the PnP commands)
  3. Re-Start the machine
  4. Install the latest version of the SharePoint PnP

That should do it. From the comments I’ve seen, and my own experience, this has a 100% success rate. Again, you can read all about it on GitHub.

Thanks to the PnP Team for all you do, and for getting this fix out so quickly.

tk

ShortURL: https://www.toddklindt.com/PoshPnPMethodNotFound

  
No presence informationTodd O. Klindt11/13/2018 3:04 PMPodcast0 
  
No presence informationTodd O. Klindt11/6/2018 10:47 AMOffice 365; PowerShell3 

The last (and first) installment in my ever popular “Without Losing Your Damned Mind” blog series, How to Connect to with Multiple Office 365 Accounts in your Browser without Losing Your Damned Mind, was a mild success, and the series was picked up. We decided it was time for a sequel, and here it is.

As an IT Pro/Administrator in the Microsoft space you have to love PowerShell. You don’t have to be an expert in it (though that really helps, I envy those guys) but you have to be confident enough with PowerShell that you can see some PowerShell on the web and be able to understand what it’s doing before you run it yourself. The way you do that is slowly, after months and years, forcing yourself to do tasks in PowerShell no matter how much it sucks. In the context of Office 365 that can get cumbersome because you have to authenticate against cloud services all the time, with many different accounts, and that requires that cursed act of typing your password. Over and over and over again. I hate typing passwords so very much. It gets worse when sometimes I’m connecting as me, sometimes as my own tenant global admin, sometimes as a customer’s tenant admin, sometimes as a different customer’s admin, it never ends.

A while back I started using Windows’ Credential Manager to manage my PowerShell logins, and that’s what this blog post is going to be about. I will assume you already know how to connect to Office 365 and Azure with PowerShell and that you have all of the necessary modules, executables, and the like installed.

The secret sauce that makes this all bearable is a PowerShell module called PowerShell Credential Manager. This little beauty uses native PowerShell to access the Credential Manager in Windows. There are other modules that do similar things, and you can actually do all of this yourself in PowerShell without a module. I’ve found this module to be the best that works for me, but this process is the same regardless of what you use.

You can install it with this line:

Install-Module -Name CredentialManager

It installs the following cmdlets:

Get-StoredCredential
Get-StrongPassword
New-StoredCredential
Remove-StoredCredential

You can use New-StoredCredential to put a new entry in the Windows Credential Manager. You can also use the Credential Manager UI to do it. It’s all the same. To create a credential with New-StoredCredential use something like this:

New-StoredCredential –Target O365Admin –username admin@tenant1.onmicrosoft.com -password pass@word1 –Persist LocalMachine

New-StoredCredential –Target Jimmy –username Jimmy@tenant1.onmicrosoft.com -password pass@word1 –Persist LocalMachine

New-StoredCredential –Target OtherAdmin –username admin@tenant2.onmicrosoft.com -password pass@word1 –Persist LocalMachine

And so on. A couple of things of note. First, all of the passwords are in plain text. If you’re running a transcript make sure you clear those out. Also, the –Persist switch is important. If you don’t add that, the Stored Credential will vanish into the ether when you close this PowerShell window. You won’t know why it doesn’t work the next and you’ll be very confused. Maybe that’s just me. You can also add a comment for the credential with the –Comment parameter.

Running the command looks like this:

image

The entries look like this in Windows:

SNAGHTML67af9a89

You can get to this screen in Control Panel, or by typing “cred” in the Start Menu. The credentials you create in PowerShell will show up under “Generic Credentials” and you can use anything that’s already there. You can also create credentials with the cleverly named, “Add a generic credential” link at the top. It doesn’t matter how they get there, it just matters that they’re there. You can create as many credentials as you want. There’s no charge. Smile

Now that we’ve loaded the Credential Store up with some yummy Office 365 Credentials, how do we use? The magic word is Get-StoredCredential.

We can use Get-StoredCredential to securely pull credentials from the Credential Manager and pass them to a PowerShell cmdlet. You can save them in a variable, or just call it directly when you connect. Here is how you connect to Azure AD:

Connect-MsolService -Credential (Get-StoredCredential -Target O365Admin)

It looks like this:

image

No passwords were typed (Hooray!) and that means you can securely automate it. The process is the same for other Connect style cmdlets. Here are a couple of examples:

Connect-AzureAD -Credential (Get-StoredCredential -Target O365Admin)

Connect-SPOService -Url https://blogpost-admin.sharepoint.com -Credential (Get-StoredCredential -Target O365Admin)

If I wanted to sign in as the Jimmy account, I would pass that to the –Target parameter:

Connect-SPOService -Url https://blogpost-admin.sharepoint.com -Credential (Get-StoredCredential -Target Jimmy )

I’m a frequent user of the PnP PowerShell. I’d give up sliced bread before I gave them up. While you can use this same approach with them, you have another option that’s even less typing:

Connect-PnPOnline -Url https://blogpost-admin.sharepoint.com -Credential O365Admin

The Connect-PnPOnline cmdlet (and maybe others) natively know to check the Credential Manager if it’s passed a string.

That’s all there is to it. Once you create a credential it’s yours to use however you’d like, as often as you’d like. This isn’t restricted to Office 365, either. Any PowerShell cmdlets that take credentials can take advantage of this.

Enjoy.

tk

ShortURL: https://www.toddklindt.com/PoshMultipleAccounts

  
No presence informationTodd O. Klindt11/5/2018 10:45 AMPodcast0 

Todd got a new job and they kick the podcast off talking about that. After they're finished gushing about that they talk about some topics Todd recently covered in classes. They also give their talk in the recent IBM purchase of Red Hat and someone that made Shane and Todd's day.

Thanks to our sponsor and the inventors of bear hugs, AppRiver.

Audio File

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Podcast 408 - Never Free the Trolls (Just Be Nice) (Time 0_02_08;08)

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Running Time: 47:26

Links:

SysKit Insights 2.0
AppRiver
SharePoint Calculated Columns and Validation Formulas
PowerApps Save Data
North American Collab Summit

ShortURL: https://www.toddklindt.com/Podcast408

  
No presence informationTodd O. Klindt11/2/2018 1:13 PM0 

Over the few months I’ve been doing a lot of consulting projects, and some of my favorites have been with my long time friends Marc Anderson (blog|twitter) and Julie Turner (blog|twitter). I’ve known Marc since roughly the beginning of time, and met Julie a few years ago when she joined him at Sympraxis. We’ve all been old friends ever since. They’re both developery types and over the last few months they’ve brought me in to help with some projects that needed an admin’s touch. At SPTechCon a couple of months ago we were sitting around catching up and Marc suggested that we put a ring on it and make it official.

What a magnificent idea!

Yesterday I officially started at Sympraxis. I’ll be doing all the same things I’ve been doing. Blogging, podcasting, teaching, and loving on SharePoint and Office 365 every day. Now though, Julie and Marc are legally required to chat with me on Teams during the day when I’m bored. Smile 

I will also continue to be the chief Evangelist for Syskit. I’m going to be staying very busy.

If you’d like to bring Sympraxis into a project, drop us a note on our Contact Page and we’ll get a hold of you.

Thanks to Marc and Julie for bringing me onboard.

tk

ShortURL: https://www.toddklindt.com/JoinSympraxis

  
No presence informationTodd O. Klindt10/31/2018 9:07 AMPodcast0 

Todd kicks off the show by telling Shane the drama of his weekend. After he's done whining they get down to business and talk about fun tech stuff like SharePoint 2019, a new version of SPDocKit, improvements to the OneDrive Sync Client, and how Shane triumphed over Sling.

Thanks to our sponsor and the inventors of bear hugs, AppRiver.

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Podcast 407 - You Can Only Laugh (Time 0_17_21;11)

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Running Time: 55:37

Links:

SharePoint Server 2019 is RTM
SPDocKit 8.0 is also out
OneDrive will now remove offline files if they aren’t accessed for a certain period
AppRiver
Apple’s TV subscription service starts in 2019 to compete with Netflix, Amazon
PowerApps and Flow Training
Thrive Conference 2018
North American Collab Summit

ShortURL: https://www.toddklindt.com/Podcast407

  
No presence informationTodd O. Klindt10/23/2018 4:14 PMSPDocKit1 

I’m not sure my heart can take much more of this. First SharePoint Server 2019 RTMs and the folks at SysKit put out another amazing version of SPDocKit, 8.0! Is today my birthday or something?!

If you haven’t used SPDocKit before, you’re missing out. Luckily the folks at SysKit have you covered, before you do anything, including finishing this blog post, go out and download their free 30 day trial.

Okay, now that we’ve got that out of the way, what is SPDocKit and what’s in it for you?

I am so glad you asked!

SPDocKit is a SharePoint Documentation tool. Quite possibly the best SharePoint Documentation tool to grace the earth with its footfall. Over the years I’ve watched the product evolve into nearly a work of art. The folks at SysKit love SharePoint, almost as much as I do, and they have their finger on the pulse of what SharePoint admins want. With each successive version of SPDocKit they add new reports and functionality that scratch the collective itches we SharePoint admins have. As a SharePoint Consultant I help all kinds of organizations implement and manage SharePoint servers. In the last year or two I’ve noticed a very pronounced shift towards wanting more reporting. Companies want a better idea of how their users are using SharePoint. SPDocKit gives that to them in spades, all in an easy to use interface.

What kind of reports does it give you? There’s almost too many to name. I’ll rattle off some of my favorites though to get you started:

  • Full Farm Documentation – Servers, services, databases, sites, everything you can think of. Best of all it keeps a copy of every report you run, so you can compare them over time and see how your environment grows.
  • Best Practices – SPDocKit looks into every crack and crevice of your SharePoint farm and let you know, nicely, what things you could be doing better. This could be SharePoint Configuration, SQL Server settings, anything. SPDocKit has your back.
  • Security – Great reports on what has been changed, who has changed what. Security is a hot topic these days and SPDocKit has you covered.
  • User Permissions – You can get Permissions reports, compare users’ permissions, copy user permissions, everything you can think of.

That’s just off the top of my head. There’s so much more. Here’s a list of just what they’ve added to version 8.0.

Go out and take SPDocKit for a spin. You won’t regret it. While you’re out there check out SysKit’s other great tools like SysKit Insights, Security Manager, the free SysKit Point.

tk

ShortURL: https://www.toddklindt.com/SPDocKit8

  
No presence informationTodd O. Klindt10/22/2018 5:03 PMSharePoint 2019; Sharepoint0 

What a day, what a day. SharePoint Server 2019 is ready for us to download and deploy into our production farms. What’s new in SharePoint 2019 you ask? A bunch. Here’s a short list:

  • Modern Sites
  • Modern Lists and Libraries
  • Modern Pages
  • Communication Sites
  • OneDrive for Business sync client support
  • Large file, large filename, fewer character restrictions

The list goes on and on.

Here are a bunch of links to get you started:

SharePoint Team Blog Post

Download SharePoint Server 2019

Quick Start Guide

Here at the Klindt Labs we’ll be installing SharePoint Server 2019 as quickly as we can and letting you know what our experience is.

tk

ShortURL: https://www.toddklindt.com/SP2019ishere

  
No presence informationTodd O. Klindt10/18/2018 4:54 PMPodcast0 

Shane is on the road, but that doesn't stop them from putting out another quality podcast. Shane starts off the podcast by telling us what's grinding his gears today. Todd then talks about a recent SharePoint event he crashed and the fun he had there. They do talk some tech, including the new SharePoint Admin Center, and a few things Todd has learned in the field in the last week. We wrap things up by mentioning some of our favorite user groups and upcoming conferences.

Thanks to our sponsor and purveyor of fine software, AppRiver.

Audio File

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Podcast 406 - What Time is it on Earth (Time 0_00_16;19)

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Running Time: 58:18

Links:

29:06 Unleash your SharePoint admin superpowers with new admin center capabilities
46:47 PowerApps String Functions
48:41 Tampa Bay SharePoint User Group
51:00 Launch of PowerApps and Flow Cincinnati User Group
51:20 SharePoint/O365 Administration Workshop with Todd Klindt
52:38 SharePoint Saturday Cincinnati
52:50 PowerApps and Flow Training
53:40 Thrive Conference 2018
55:54 North American Collab Summit

ShortURL: https://www.toddklindt.com/Podcast406

  
No presence informationTodd O. Klindt10/17/2018 5:01 PMPodcast0 
  
No presence informationTodd O. Klindt10/8/2018 3:17 PMPodcast0 

We start this week's podcast solving the mystery of what the difference between Britain and the United Kingdom is. We think. Then we move on to topics like Ignite, security for small businesses, how to restore delete, and then restore, nearly 100,000 files in Office 365 and some fun in PowerShell.

Thanks to our sponsor and BFF, AppRiver.

Audio File

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Podcast 404 - I Don't Want to Break a Hip (Time 0_08_48;07)

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Running Time: 53:12

Links:

06:09 Different between UK, Great Britain, and England
28:22 AppRiver
40:18 Introducing the PowerShell Excel Module
39:19 PSCalendar by Jeff Hicks
41:21 PowerApps AddColumns ShowColumns
43:38 April Dunnam
44:00 Oklahoma PowerApps and Flow User Group
44:51 PowerSummit
45:53 Launch of PowerApps and Flow Cincinnati User Group
46:21 SharePoint/O365 Administration Workshop with Todd Klindt
47:00 Register here
47:57 SharePoint Saturday Cincinnati
48:28 PowerApps and Flow Training
48:58 Thrive Conference 2018
51:09 North American Collab Summit

ShortURL: https://www.toddklindt.com/Podcast404

  
No presence informationTodd O. Klindt10/7/2018 11:15 PMOffice 3657 

Every day I’m knee deep, well, waist deep in Office 365. My personal email and all of that is in Office 365. I’m also the Global Admin for that same tenant. I jump into customer tenants all the time and I have 2 or 3 demo and trial tenants that I’m routinely noodling around in. Since all of those environments are in the same DNS domain, office.com, it’s tough to handle being signed into them all at the same time. You can use in-private or incognito mode, but that only gets you one additional user, as all in-private mode windows share the same memory space. You could use multiple browsers, but that gets unwieldy remembering which browser is for which account, and at some point you end up using Microsoft Edge, and that’s just not worth it. It would seem this summit is insurmountable. I am here to tell you fellow Office 365 lover, that it is not. I have cracked the code, and I’m going to show you how.

First, let me say this is not something I figured out on my own. I’m not blazing any new trails here. There are dozens of blog posts on this already, some by friends of mine. I’m writing this blog post because I’ve told a few people about it recently and they hadn’t heard about. I thought I’d blog this and make it official.

The secret to making this all work is to use Google Chrome. Chrome has support for multiple people, and we’re going to use that to set up a Person for each Office 365 persona we have. Each Chrome Person has its own separate password store, bookmarks, and plugins. Perfect for what we’re doing.

Of course you’ll need to have Google Chrome installed before this will work. You can download it from this link. Or, you can show off your geek prowess and download it with PowerShell using this:

Invoke-WebRequest "http://dl.google.com/chrome/install/375.126/chrome_installer.exe" -OutFile chrome_installer.exe –UseBasicParsing

Chrome auto-updates, so even if you get an older version, it should update itself after it installs.

After it’s installed look in the upper right corner for the Person icon. This screenshot shows my current Person and icon, but yours might look different:

image

It pulled my name “Todd” and my picture from my Google profile. After I created this person I logged into my Google account and it got it from there. We’ll cover that later. If you click on the Person icon you’ll get a dropdown like this. To add another user, click “Manage people.”

image

Right now I have a single, lonely person in Chrome. Fortunately we can add some friends with the Add Person button.

image

When you click the Add Person you get the dialog box to, well, add another user. I log in as my Office 365 Global Admin, so I’m going to make a Person for that user. I’m calling it “Office Admin” and I’m choosing the Ninja as its icon, it seems appropriate. If I log into Google as this Person it will download my Google profile including bookmarks and my Google avatar will replace the Ninja, sadly. In the lower left you have the option of creating a desktop icon for this Person. If you don’t, you simply pick it from the list in an existing Chrome instance. You can also add the desktop icon later if you regret not making it when you created the Person.

image

Now when we go into the “Manage people” screen my user has friends.

image

You can add as many users as you want. Each will have its own environment and its own set of stored passwords, bookmarks, and so on.

You know what they say, “Pics or it didn’t happen.”

image

You can see I have two browsers both logged into Office as different users, and best of all it will all persist, so the next time I use the “Office Admin” Person in Chrome it will remember my username and password. And also unlike using Incognito Mode, I can have more than two different users logged in at a time.

While I’ve talked about this all in the context of Office 365, it works for anything. If you have multiple Twitter accounts, YouTube accounts, whatever, this works. It’s a miracle of modern science, that’s what it is.

tk

ShortURL: https://www.toddklindt.com/ManyUsersBrowser

  
No presence informationTodd O. Klindt10/1/2018 3:47 PMOffice 365; SharePoint 2016; Speaking; Sharepoint1 

Want to join me for an all day SharePoint and Office 365 Admin Workshop? You are so in luck! On October 26th 2018 I will be teaching a one day workshop in beautiful, sunny Omaha Nebraska, Peyton Manning’s favorite!

Here’s the official event information:

Are you a SharePoint or Office 365 administrator looking for a fun way to spend a chilly Midwestern Friday? If so, then join Todd Klindt on Friday, October 26th for an all-day workshop on SharePoint and Office 365 Administration. He’ll pack as much administrative goodness into one day as humanly possible. He’s going to cover on-prem topics architecture and administration. Then he’ll switch gears and talk about cloud and Office 365 topics like authentication with Azure AD, OneDrive, SharePoint Online, Groups, and other administrative topics. After that foundation is laid down he’ll bring it all together by covering some of the hybrid opportunities there are with on-prem and online SharePoint and help you figure out which ones make the most sense for you. If there’s any time or brain cells left he’ll talk about migration and PowerShell.

The Omaha SharePoint User Group has created this low-cost training opportunity for our community.  While we normally meet a couple hours each month, this day will provide an exceptional training opportunity at a very low cost. 

What a great way to start your weekend, please join Todd on Friday for all things SharePoint.

Technologies Covered

SharePoint, Office 365, Azure AD, OneDrive, Groups

Details

Breakfast and snacks will be provided.  Lunch is on your own.

All of this for only $50. What a good deal! Register now before all the seats are taken and you’re forced to press your face to the window from the outside and watch the rest of us have the times of our lives.

I've had a couple of questions about this. This class is in-person only. I don't think there are options for remote viewing. Sorry to anyone that has the misfortune of not being in Omaha that day.

tk

ShortURL: https://www.toddklindt.com/OmahaWorkshop2018

  
No presence informationTodd O. Klindt9/28/2018 5:40 PMPodcast0 

The Microwave IS listening. Todd and Shane break it down for you this week. They also talk about Todd's controversial new blog post on Microsoft Flow and how it got him mentioned on another podcast. They also talk about some of the news coming out of Ignite and wrap things up complaining about DNS.

Thanks to our sponsor, AppRiver.

Audio File

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Podcast 403 - The High End of the Low End (Time 0_17_19;14) 

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Running Time: 48:09

Links:

19:00 Amazon's Smart Microwave
25:00 How to Disable the Flow button in SharePoint Online
33:45 SharePoint Dev Weekly – Episode 6
34:45 AppRiver
38:00 SharePoint Online Deployments Surging
48:00 What’s new in security, compliance, & administration for SharePoint & OneDrive from Microsoft Ignite
50:30 OneDrive Announcements at Ignite 2018
57:34 SharePoint Saturday New England 2018
58:00 How to Prepare for an Upgrade to SharePoint 2019
58:40 PowerSummit
59:30 SharePoint/O365 Administration Workshop with Todd Klindt
59:45Register here
1:00:00 SharePoint Saturday Cincinnati
1:01:00 PowerApps and Flow Training
1:02:00 North American Collab Summit

ShortURL: https://www.toddklindt.com/Podcast403

  
No presence informationTodd O. Klindt9/25/2018 5:15 PMPodcast0 

The podcast starts out with Todd and Shane complaining about patches and the things they break. They also talk about cord cutting, how to get properties of objects with the PnP PowerShell, and what Azure DBaaS is why Shane loves it so gosh darned much.

Thanks to our sponsor, AppRiver.

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Podcast 402 - Oodles and Oodles of Poodles (Time 0_23_30;25)

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Running Time: 47:46

Links:

14:14 "The closest you can get to knowing what it’s like to be a ghost is listening to a podcast where the hosts are trying to remember a piece of trivia that you know"
41:09 SharePoint Saturday New England 2018
41:51 How to Prepare for an Upgrade to SharePoint 2019
43:03 PowerSummit
45:07 North American Collab Summit

ShortURL: https://www.toddklindt.com/Podcast402

  
No presence informationTodd O. Klindt9/21/2018 8:19 AMPodcast0 

Todd's flying solo this week as Shane is selfishly on vacation. Todd powers on and talks about his troubles using PowerShell with Teams, and why your boss is wrong if he doesn't like the PnP PowerShell.

Thanks to our sponsor, AppRiver.

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Podcast 401 - So Much Better than the First Time I Did It (Time 0_17_34;26)

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Running Time: 34:04

Links:

Live events in Microsoft Teams
SharePoint Saturday New England 2018
9th Annual Thrive Conference

ShortURL: https://www.toddklindt.com/Podcast401

  
No presence informationTodd O. Klindt9/19/2018 5:09 PMPowerShell; Office 365; Sharepoint3 

Now, now, I know what you’re thinking, “This is a terrible idea! Why would any want to disable Flow?? What’s Flow ever done to them anyway?” I’m right there with you, honest I am, but a customer asked me how to do this and I can’t imagine they’re the only ones trying to do it. So while I’m a big fan of Flow and think everyone should enjoy it, in the unlikely event your organization doesn’t want to, here’s how to disable it.

When things are in their default state, the Ribbon, or Toolbar in a Modern List or Document Library in Office 365 shows an easy to use link to wire up a Flow to the library. It looks like this:

SNAGHTML206e612

Very cute, very innocent, but regardless, some folks don’t want it there. Even if the user hitting the list or library isn’t licensed to use Flow, it’s there. This is a per site collection setting, and nowhere in the site or site collection settings is there a place to shut it off. I turned on the Bat Signal, and PowerShell answered my call. Sort of…

The official Microsoft SharePoint Online cmdlets have a cmdlets, Set-SPOSite and it has a parameter, –DisableFlows. Are you thinking what I’m thinking? Of course you are. And it does what we want, kind of. Here’s how the whole solution looks:

Connect-SPOService -Url https://flowhater-admin.sharepoint.com

$val = [Microsoft.Online.SharePoint.TenantAdministration.FlowsPolicy]::Disabled
Set-SPOSite -Identity
https://flowhater.sharepoint.com/sites/Me2Hub -DisableFlows $val

You have to do the funny business with $val because the –DisableFlows parameter doesn’t accept a boolean, like a civilized parameter does, it requires its value to be in the form of a Microsoft.Online.SharePoint.TenantAdministration.FlowsPolicy object, whatever that is. So that’s what it gets.

Now when we go to our Document Library it looks like this:

SNAGHTML20d5a7a

Sad, I know. When you come to your senses and want to reenable Flow, here’s how you do it:

$val = [Microsoft.Online.SharePoint.TenantAdministration.FlowsPolicy]::NotDisabled
Set-SPOSite -Identity
https://flowhater.sharepoint.com/sites/Me2Hub -DisableFlows $val

And now is all right in the world.

Unless you have the fancy Site Collections that are using Groups in the background. Then you get the “womp womp” sound from Set-SPOSite. Okay, it really says, “Set-SPOSite : https://flowhater.sharepoint.com/sites/SPODemo2-Test2 is a Groups site collection.” but we all know what it really means. A less motivated man would have given up at this point. He would have taken this as a sign from the universe that one should not be disabling Flows, it’s just unnatural. Not this man. (In reality, not this man’s customer). So I went to Plan B, the PnP PowerShell, and it did not disappoint. The PnP’s version of the Set-Site cmdlet works with Group Site Collections and doesn’t require any weird casting voodoo. Here’s how it looks:

Connect-PnPOnline -Url https://flowhater.sharepoint.com/sites/SPODemo2-Test2 -Credentials 'SteffenAdmin'

Set-PnPSite -DisableFlows:$true

Here’s how you right that wrong:

Set-PnPSite -DisableFlows:$false

That’s much easier, and works on all site collections.

There you have it. I hope you never have to use it. Smile

tk

ShortURL: https://www.toddklindt.com/PoshDisableFlowButton

  
No presence informationTodd O. Klindt9/18/2018 9:40 AMSharePoint 2016; SharePoint 2019; SharePoint 2013; SharePoint 2010; Speaking0 

Are you excited about SharePoint 2019? You know I am! Join me Thursday, September 27th at 10 CDT for a free (as in beer) webinar where I talk about what I’m doing with my customers to get them all primed and ready for SharePoint 2019. Some will be technical, some will be social, but it will all be fun.

The fine folks at SysKit are footing the bill for it all. Thanks!

Sign up here!

I hope to see you there.

tk

ShortURL: https://www.toddklindt.com/SysKitSP2019Prepare

  
No presence informationTodd O. Klindt9/15/2018 11:42 AMSharePoint 2010; SharePoint 2013; SharePoint 201617 

This isn’t specifically a SharePoint patching issue, but it’s close enough I thought I’d add it. A recent .NET security patch, KB 4457916, while doing a bang-up job fixing a remote exploitation in .NET, broke Workflows in SharePoint. Of course you could uninstall the patch, but everyone except the bad guys think that’s a horrible idea. Fortunately there’s a  fix that allows you all the protection of the patch as well as continue to enjoy SharePoint workflows. This blog post on MSDN provides the solution;

After that, you should be good to go.

This issue punctuates why it’s important to keep an eye on the Windows patches on your SharePoint servers. If you’re using some sort of patch distribution service, like WSUS, your SharePoint servers should be in their own group.

If you’ve had any experience with this patch or the fix, leave a comment below.

tk

ShortURL: https://www.toddklindt.com/PatchBreaksWorkflow

  
No presence informationTodd O. Klindt9/12/2018 4:02 PMPodcast0 

It's the big 4-0-0! Todd and Shane look back at the last nine years of podcasting glory. They also welcome a new sponsor, AppRiver. While they're waxing nostalgically they talk about the great time they had at SPTechCon in Boston. After all that's finished they get down to some tech goodness. They give their review of Bob German's recent posting on how to customize and brand SharePoint Online. The SharePoint Online PowerShell module got an exciting change and they cover that as well. They finish up by talking about the recent Azure outage and some cool things Shane has done with PowerApps and Flow.

Thanks to our sponsor, AppRiver.

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Podcast 400 - Drumroll Please (Time 1_10_24;09) 

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Running Time: 48:49

Links:

3:00 Update to SysKit Insights
13:05 AppRiver our newest Sponsor
18:35 SPTechCon Austin 2019
31:20 Branding SharePoint: The New Normal
34:23 Announcing availability of SharePoint Online Management Shell from PowerShell Gallery
43:25 PowerApps Google Maps API
43:26 PowerApps Generate a PDF with a Flow
44:00 SharePoint Saturday New England 2018
46:10 9th Thrive Conference

ShortURL: https://www.toddklindt.com/Podcast400

  
No presence informationTodd O. Klindt9/7/2018 4:45 PMPodcast0 
  
No presence informationTodd O. Klindt8/8/2018 8:37 AMPodcast0 

Shane and Todd are back together this week and a good time is had by all. They talk about patches, SharePoint 2019, blogging every day, EVERY DAY, for over a year. That and more this week on Todd and Shane's Cloudy Podcast.

Audio File

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Podcast 398 - Sounds Dumb (Time 0_00_03;18)

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Running Time: 48:43

Links:

1:00 SPDocKit Review – July 2018
2:00 New in SysKit Security Manager: Automatic Discovery of Site Collections
23:49 The Patch that is destroying the world
28:30 SharePoint Server 2019 Public Preview
34:38 SharePoint Server 2016 dev/test environment in Azure
35:00 Shanes Video series
36:41 SharePoint 2013/2010 - Remove Columns Name from Group View
40:26 Vote for Save in AutoSave
38:06 Tracy van der Schyff
40:00 SPS Charlotte
41:00 SharePoint Saturday New England 2018
42:00 SPTechCon Boston

ShortURL: http://www.toddklindt.com/Podcast398

  
No presence informationTodd O. Klindt7/24/2018 4:13 PM0 

There are a few things I get really, really excited about. Buy one, get one free day at Dairy Queen is one of them. New versions of SharePoint are another. DQ failed me today, but Microsoft did not. Today they released the SharePoint Server 2019 Public Preview. You can read all about it on Bill Baer’s Tech Community blog post. 

If you don’t want to read all of Bill’s words (who does, really?) here are some quick links:

Download SharePoint Server 2019

SharePoint 2019 Quick Start Guide

SharePoint 2019 Reviewer’s Guide

Now that SharePoint 2019 is out you can look forward to some blog posts here about it. Leave me comments below and let me know what you think.

tk

ShortURL: https://www.toddklindt.com/SP2019isHere

  
No presence informationTodd O. Klindt7/22/2018 10:28 AMPodcast0 

Another blissful week of no Shane. Ahhh, so refreshing. Todd takes advantage of this quality time to talk about nuts and bolts things like patching and account permissions. He also makes fun of Amazon Prime Day. Microsoft had a couple of big announcements around Teams and Whiteboard, and he tells you what that's all about. Finally, he tells you about some recent things he's published.

Audio File

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Podcast 397 - Together, Cozy (Time 0_50_02;23)

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Running Time: 35:54

Links:

  1. 05:39 Account permissions
  2. 19:49 Microsoft Teams has a free tier now
  3. 23:43 Microsoft Whiteboard generally available for Windows
  4. 25:39 SPDocKit Review – July 2018
  5. 30:01 SharePoint Best Intentions – Planning versus Reality
  6. 31:00 Business Application Summit Keynote Live
  7. 34:04 SPS Charlotte
  8. 34:10 SharePoint Saturday New England 2018
  9. 34:30 Business Application Summit
  10. 34:35 SPTechCon Boston

ShortURL: http://www.toddklindt.com/Podcast397

  
No presence informationTodd O. Klindt7/19/2018 9:23 AMSharepoint; Petri0 

I’ve published another article at Petri.com, SharePoint Best Intentions – Planning versus Reality. You’ll like it. I promise.

tk

ShortURL: https://www.toddklindt.com/SPIntentions

  
No presence informationTodd O. Klindt7/18/2018 9:33 AMSPDocKit0 

Back in May I started doing marketing work for SysKit, the folks that bring you fine products like SPDocKit. One of the things they asked me to do was to write a review of SPDocKit from the view of someone that uses it. They know I’ve been a big fan of SPDocKit for years, so I was happy to do it. This blog post is my review of SPDocKit, or at least the first part of it. I had so many things to say SysKit had to finally cut me off and tell me to publish the thing. I may follow this up with some more thoughts later.

Here it is, my review of SPDocKit.

I've been a SharePoint Administrator for a lot of years, the majority of my professional career. Over that time I've seen a lot of SharePoint utilities come and go. A few have grabbed me as being must haves, and SPDocKit is one of them. Since the first time I used it I knew how much value it provided the SharePoint admin, and with each update it's gotten even better. Today I want to walk you through a quick review of a few of my favorite pieces of SPDocKit and how you can put it to use for you.

One of SharePoint's biggest strengths, and why I think it has been so popular is how easy it makes things for the users. IT is no longer the bottleneck to adding functionality or getting things done. If a user wants to add someone to their site, they can. If a user wants to create a new list, library, or even subsite, they can. No waiting on hold with the helpdesk. No filling out a web form that they didn’t know existed. No bribing IT with a bag of candy. All without IT lifting a finger. A win for IT, a win for the user, and ultimately a win for the business. But it does have a cost…

SharePoint's greatest strength, putting power in the hands of the people, is also one of its greatest problems. Users don't care about governance, security, storage resources, any of that. They just worry about getting their job done. Unfortunately, sometimes that runs afoul of IT, and without IT knowing about it. Over the years IT departments have either been blindsided by this, when data leaked out, or drives filled up, or they’ve cobbled together solutions to keep an eye on it. I learned a long time ago what my favorite solution to the problem was, frequent doses of SPDocKit applied liberally to my SharePoint farms.

SPDocKit is a tool, conceived and inspired by SharePoint experts, that documents your SharePoint farm in stunning detail. That sounds pretty boring on its surface, no one likes documentation. But the folks at SysKit have taken SharePoint documentation to a whole new level. They’ve made documentation fun, and very powerful. Not only does it do an impressively thorough of documenting a SharePoint farm, it produces completely customizable professional looking reports that are useful to admins, and their bosses. Personally, I don’t think any SharePoint farm is complete without SPDocKit. It gives the SharePoint Admin a fighting chance of keeping up with the growth and proliferation of their farms.

The SPDocKit installation is a breeze. Don’t take my word for it, download a trial for free and walk through the install yourself. It’s right up my alley as a SharePoint admin that enjoys clicking “next” and “finish” a lot. You have the option to have SPDocKit store its results in SQL, and I recommend that. Since you’re documenting SharePoint you have a SQL instance at your disposal. Letting SPDocKit use SQL allows it to take advantage of SQL’s database engine to run queries and give you better information faster.

Another nice touch is that while SPDocKit caters to SharePoint admins, it also has an install mode for SharePoint consultants, such as myself. This allows me to run it on a customer’s farm without leaving it there afterwards. Features like this showcase how in tune the SPDocKit developers are with the people that use their tools.

Once you get SPDocKit installed you’re greeted with a very friendly page that shows you what tools are at your disposal.

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There are a ton of great tools in SPDocKit, but the ones I use the most are in the top heading, Documentation and Configuration. This is where SPDocKit got its start and where it really shines, in my opinion.

My trips into SPDocKit on a new farm usually start with “Take Snapshot.” If SPDocKit had a weakness (and I’m not sure it does) it would be that it does too good of a job collecting data. It finds useful information in many dark corners of SharePoint, and in that can be overwhelming depending on how big your farm is, or what information you’re looking for. To help combat the potential information overload, SPDocKit has a couple of options for what is collected during a snapshot. The “Default” mode is a good place to start. That report runs pretty quickly and gives you a good overview of what snapshots collect.

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As you get more familiar with SPDocKit you can fine tune what does and does not get included in the Snapshot. Choosing the “Custom” mode lights up the “Options” step, which gives you more fine tuning on what is and isn’t included in the Snapshot.

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You can run Snapshots as often as you’d like. SPDocKit keeps track of them all. At any point you can look at any previous Snapshot. You can create a report from the Snapshot, or even more.

The obvious power of snapshots is to give you an easily consumable look at your farm at that moment. See how things are going, so you can address something if it needs it, or be proactive and get ahead of any problems coming down the road. SPDocKit does that with ease, but it takes it one step further. It allows you to compare snapshots over time, so you can also see trends in your farm.

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The Compare Wizard can also compare two different farms, for instance, if you want to compare your Test farm with Production.

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If you choose to compare two snapshots from the same farm you get a dialog box that lets you choose which two Snapshots to compare.

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Once you choose the Snapshots, SPDocKit gets to work comparing them. After that’s finished, you got a dialog like the one below.

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There are several results possible for each compared node. In the screenshot above, SPDocKit pointed out that the build number was different between the two Snapshots. The Snapshot taken before was running the April 2018 patch, 16.0.4678.1001. Some time after that, the farm was patched to the June 2018 patch, 16.0.4705.1000. If we drill down farther, we can also see there are differences in the site collections and content databases in the farm.

Reports

The place where SPDocKit really shines is with its reporting. As a nerd, it’s often tough for me communicate correctly with non-nerdy audiences. I get all excited about the technical aspects of something, and completely forget that not everyone else does. Sometimes I need help presenting in a way that can be easily consumed by my audience. SPDocKit lets me do this. It lets me see all the deep technical details of my farm, all the bytes of this, the users in that, but also lets me take that information, and distill it down to something that any CIO or other higher level person can look at and makes heads or tails of, without being overwhelmed by all the technical minutia. Not only does SPDocKit create easy to read, professional looking reports, it allows you nearly infinite customization options. This can be what information is reported, how deeply that information is reported, and even the style and colors used to report it. If your company has a particular color palette it uses, SPDocKit can make your reports match that. Want to put your corporate logo on the reports, too? Easy enough. And once you get the formatting exactly how you want it, you just save the template and SPDocKit lets you use that any time you create a report.

I fill pages with all the customization options you have, but I won’t do that. I’ll show you a couple and let you take SPDocKit for a trial run and explore on your own.

When you want to create a report, choose the Snapshot you want to report on and open it up. In the ribbon at the top you’ll see “Generate” in the Documentation area.

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Notice “Customization” right next to that.

Choose the format you want your documentation in. I usually choose PDF, as that is easy to forward on to whoever I am reporting to. After you choose the documentation type I’m presented with a dialog box asking which Template I want to use. These templates let you pick what information is included in the report.

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Like the default Snapshot, choosing the “Simple Documentation” template is a good place to start. If you change any of the objects reported, SPDocKit will ask you at the end if you want to save it. That’s how I created the cleverly named “Temp 1” template at the end of that list.

Once you’re satisfied that the information you want is in there, and the information you don’t want isn’t, click “Generate.” You’ll get the familiar Save dialog box where you can specify the name and location of your report.

SPDocKit will open the report for you after it’s been saved. It will probably be a lot of pages, so don’t be surprised if you don’t have to run the Report Generation wizard a few times to get exactly the right information. Here are a couple of screenshots of the report I ran on one of my test servers:

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Here’s the Microsoft Word version of the same report, with a little color splashed on for good measure.

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As you can see, for good or bad, you have a lot of flexibility.

I’ve run out of time for this blog post and I’ve only scratched the surface of what SPDocKit can do. There’s so much more to talk about. In an upcoming blog post I’ll gush over the other features that make SPDocKit such a great and indispensable tool.

tk

ShortURL: https://www.toddklindt.com/SPDocKitReview

  
No presence informationTodd O. Klindt7/17/2018 8:26 AMPodcast2 

Todd is flying solo this week, so it's an extra good podcast. He covers several new releases from Microsoft like Known Folder Move, Idle-Session timeout, and SharePoint Online cmdlets. He also covers some tips on how to use the SharePoint Migration Tool and how to keep the Office 365 autosave from destroying your important documents.

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Podcast 396 - Documents I've Destroyed (Time 0_05_49;18)

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Running Time: 36:44

Links:

01:32 Todd got renewed!
04:52 How to Dig Deeper Into Your SharePoint Farm
04:23 5 Things You Can Do to Prepare for your SharePoint 2019 Migration
07:32 Use the Page Diagnostics tool for SharePoint Online
10:39 Known Folder Move
16:06 New SharePoint Online Management Shell
18:41 Azure Active Directory cmdlets for configuring group settings
21:57 MAKING SHORT LINKS LONG WITH POWERSHELL AND WPF
24:18 Idle-Session Timeout Policy in SharePoint Online & OneDrive is now Generally Available
26:18 Take your summer back and automate your Office 365 migration
29:11 Use Save a Copy to modify a file without changing the original
33:58 SPS Charlotte
34:05 SharePoint Saturday New England 2018
34:36 Business Application Summit
34:52 SPTechCon Boston

ShortURL: http://www.toddklindt.com/Podcast396

  
No presence informationTodd O. Klindt7/11/2018 2:58 PMSharePoint 2019; Sharepoint0 

Today I published an article at Petri, How to Dig Deeper Into Your SharePoint Farm. Check it out.

tk

ShortURL: https://www.toddklindt.com/DigDeeper

  
No presence informationTodd O. Klindt7/11/2018 2:39 PMPodcast0 

In this episode you cannot win for losing. Todd took the week off. Yay! But Jonathan Mast filled his spot as microphone hog reducing your time with Shane. Boo! The good news is Shane and Jonathan have some great chats about Azure and SharePoint and how the landscape has changed for the better. For news there is some fun around Sensitive Data types in Office 365, Microsoft Teams adding archiving, and PowerApps Repeating tables. Even with all of the things working against him, Shane manages to create another awesome show!

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Podcast 395 - California is Jealous (Time 0_15_09;24)

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Running Time: 39:31

Links:

New GDPR sensitive information types help you manage and protect personal data
Microsoft Teams can now be archived
PowerApps Repeating Tables like InfoPath Part 1
PowerApps Repeating Tables like InfoPath Part 2
PowerApps Repeating Tables like InfoPath Part 3
SPS Charlotte
SharePoint Saturday New England 2018
Business Application Summit
SPTechCon Boston

ShortURL: http://www.toddklindt.com/Podcast395

  
No presence informationTodd O. Klindt7/6/2018 8:35 AMSharePoint 2016; SharePoint 2019; Sharepoint2 

The Internet is a pretty big place. There’s my blog, YouTube, some funny cat videos, lots of stuff in lots of places. I think it’s safe to say I’m the uncontested best poster here at toddklindt.com. It was a an uphill fight, but I prevailed. I’ve set my sights a bit higher. I’m going to start writing articles for Petri.com as well. I’ve written a few things for them in the past, but hopefully I’ll do a better job sticking with it this time. I’ll still be posting here at toddklindt.com, so don’t remove it from your Favorites bar just yet. I’ll just be augmenting it with some articles over at Petri. That’s a decent site too, so you’re probably already going there. If you’re not, shame on you, you should be.

My first article, 5 Things You Can Do to Prepare for your SharePoint 2019 Migration, went up this week. Check it out. You can leave comments there or here. I’m checking both places.

If you have ideas for articles, for here or there, let me know. I’m always happy to take requests. Even “stop writing” requests. Smile

tk

ShortURL: https://www.toddklindt.com/SP20195Things

  
No presence informationTodd O. Klindt7/2/2018 2:44 PMSharepoint2 

July 1st is one of my favorite days of the year. It’s the beginning of the second half of the calendar year, the days are long, the sun is bright, and of course, it’s Canada Day! And our own Independence Day is right around the corner. It’s about this time I start getting out my shorts with the elastic waistband in preparation for all the good eats.

July 1st has also been, for the last decade, MVP renewal date.

The MVP Program is a program at Microsoft were they recognize people in the community that support and evangelize Microsoft products. I have gotten the award every year since 2006, and without too much hyperbole, it has changed my life. It has opened doors for me that otherwise would have been very difficult to open, and it has allowed me to surround myself with many like-minded folks, most of which are much smarter than me, and most of which I am lucky enough to call friends. It’s been wonderful, to say the least. So every year, when July 1st starts getting close, I get nervous. I get nervous that my contributions in the previous year weren’t enough to earn the award for another year. That would be very sad indeed.

Fortunately yesterday I got the happy email,

SNAGHTML486b9481

I’d like to thank Microsoft for the opportunity and for renewing me each year. I’d also like to thank everyone that reads my blog, responds to my tweets, and comes to my sessions. I do all of this for you all, and knowing it helps you is what keeps me going.

And congratulations to all of my fellow MVPs out there that either got renewed, or were awarded for the first time.

tk

ShortURL: https://www.toddklindt.com/2018MVPAward

  
No presence informationTodd O. Klindt6/21/2018 10:46 AMPodcast1 

Todd and Shane both got new toys last week, and they start off the show gushing over them. They do eventually get into some meaty Office 365 goodness. They talk about a free way you can kick start your SharePoint Online sites, how to secure your Azure AD accounts, how to keep up with all the new things in OneDrive, and a couple of PowerApps videos Shane made. All of that and some love for GDPR, this week on the Cloudy Podcast.

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Podcast 394 - Hate Them Right in the Face (Time 0_27_54;10)

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Running Time: 46:12

Links:

01:33 SharePoint 2019 – Something to Look Forward to!
24:21 Introducing SharePoint Starter Kit
28:00 Securing privileged access for hybrid and cloud deployments in Azure AD
32:05 OneDrive Message Center Updates
34:04 First GDPR now Memes. When will it stop?
40:09 PowerApps Random Function
40:10 PowerApps Code Comments
40:11 PowerApps Repeating Tables like InfoPath
42:30 SPS Charlotte
42:35 SharePoint Saturday New England 2018
43:30 Business Application Summit
43:32 SPTechCon Boston

ShortURL: http://www.toddklindt.com/Podcast394

  
No presence informationTodd O. Klindt6/20/2018 2:27 PMPodcast0 

Todd and Shane cover a lot of ground this week. They talk about whether you should upgrade to SharePoint 2016 now that SharePoint 2019 has been announced, how to see the URL behind those tricky URL shorteners, what's so great about Google Fi, Shane's battle with orphans, and how you can tame Flow and PowerApps with PowerShell.

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Podcast 393 - Hairy Spice (Time 0_27_44;02)

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Running Time: 42:59

Links:

02:14 Now that SharePoint 2019 is Announced, Should I Even Bother with SharePoint 2016?
08:46 Resolve Short URLs with PowerShell
12:53 All SPC18 podcast episodes recap
19:58 Google Fi
210:00 Cheap phone stand
39:27 Business Application Summit
40:00 SPS Charlotte
40:30 SharePoint Saturday New England 2018
41:00 SPTechCon Boston

ShortURL: http://www.toddklindt.com/Podcast393

  
No presence informationTodd O. Klindt6/13/2018 9:17 AMPodcast0 

No Shane this week, so Todd is at the helm serving up some podcasting goodness. He starts off talking about Microsoft buying Github. Then he digs in to a bunch of great Office 365 topics. How to keep up with your DNS records, new SharePoint cmdlets, how to get a free Office 365, and why you should start your day at office.com. All of that, and no Shane. Everybody wins.

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Podcast 392 - He Who Shall Not be Named (Time 0_00_38;15)

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Running Time: 38:28

Links:

01:08 https://www.toddklindt.com/SyskitWebinar
10:14 Microsoft Bought GitHub and the Clippy Jokes Escalated Quickly
11:26 Best practices for using assigned Office 365 DNS records
19:03 New SharePoint Online Management Shell
20:22 PnP PowerShell
23:51 Office 365 Developer Subscription
29:19 SharePoint install error about .Net 4.5
32:07 Microsoft sinks data centre off Orkney
35:50 SPS Charlotte
35:51 SharePoint Saturday New England 2018
36:36 SPTechCon Boston

ShortURL: http://www.toddklindt.com/Podcast392

  
No presence informationTodd O. Klindt6/10/2018 5:11 PMPodcast0 

Todd and Shane start out this week's podcast by reflecting back fondly on the SharePoint Conference. They then talk about some version changes to SharePoint Online, remind listeners how to keep up with the changes in Office 365, how Azure AD and Office 365 keep ahead of the bad guys, and Shane tries something new this week and promotes a PowerApps video.

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Podcast 391 - His Dog Can Hack that Thing (Time 0_12_30;11)

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Running Time: 45:07

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13:54 Versioning update to Document Libraries in team sites in SharePoint Online and OneDrive for Business
14:00 How to Keep up with Office 365 Changes
20:23 How we protect #AzureAD and Microsoft Account from lists of leaked usernames and passwords
23:04 Hacked Routers!
35:45 Phishing Email with fake O365 admin stuff
37:18 Fake cell phone towers in DC
40:50 PowerApps Send Multiple Email attachments
42:30 SPS Montreal
42:31 SPS Charlotte
42:32 SharePoint Saturday New England 2018
43:33 SPTechCon Boston

ShortURL: http://www.toddklindt.com/Podcast391

  
No presence informationTodd O. Klindt6/8/2018 4:16 PMSharePoint 2016; SharePoint 20192 

Now that I’ve had a couple of weeks to catch my breath after SPC I took the opportunity to write a couple of blog posts for Syskit about what I brought back with me. The first one I wrote was inspired by a question I got a lot while I was at SPC,

“I have SharePoint 2013. Should I just skip SharePoint 2016 now that SharePoint 2019 has been announced?”

It’s an involved question with a lot of nuance. To see my full answer read my blog post,

Now that SharePoint 2019 is Announced, Should I Even Bother with SharePoint 2016? on the SysKit blog.

Let me know what you think in the comments below, or at SysKit.

tk

ShortURL: https://www.toddklindt.com/SysKitShouldIUpgrade

  
No presence informationTodd O. Klindt5/30/2018 11:13 AMPodcast0 

Shane and Todd are live from the Expo Hall at the SharePoint Conference NA 2018. In this podcast they give their reactions to the things announced in the keynote.

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Podcast 390 - SharePoint Conference 2018 Keynote wrapup (Time 0_05_28;14)

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Running Time: 31:49

ShortURL: http://www.toddklindt.com/Podcast390

  
No presence informationTodd O. Klindt5/29/2018 3:13 PMPodcast0 

Shane and Todd start out this week's podcast by talking about what they've been watching on TV. They eventually dig into tech content, though. They chat about the security patch that's preventing people from logging into machines remotely, and how to get around it. They also cover Microsoft's new Surface Hub 2, cheap Surface tablets, Roku troubles, leaving Guest tenants, and of course, PowerApps.

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Podcast 389 - Deadpool Onesie (Time 0_05_53;19)

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Running Time: 50:06

Links:

00:30 SysKit Security Manager 2.0
10:45 Unable to RDP to Virtual Machine: CredSSP Encryption Oracle Remediation
13:35 Social Engineering for 2 factor auth
19:13 Microsoft Unveils Gorgeous New Surface Hub 2
22:33 Low-Cost Surface Tablet Coming in 2018
26:28 Roku devices show FBI warning in channel outage
30:06 Exciting improvements to the B2B collaboration experience
34:48 The universe is getting away from us
41:21 Custom SharePoint List Forms with PowerApps
45:07 SPS Montreal
45:08 SPS Charlotte
45:09 SharePoint Saturday New England 2018
45:58 SharePoint North America Conference
48:59 SPTechCon Boston

ShortURL: http://www.toddklindt.com/Podcast389

  
No presence informationTodd O. Klindt5/19/2018 11:26 PMPowerShell0 

The Internet wouldn’t work if it weren’t for Short URLs. How else would we efficiently share our funny cat videos? I’ve written a couple of blog posts on them myself. Handy little devils, aren’t they? 

One downside of them is you don’t know where they’re going to lead you. That innocent looking bit.ly link could take you to some amazing bit of wisdom on the internet, sure. But short URLs can have a dark side, too. The payload waiting for you on the other side of that t.co link could also be a Rick Astley video, you just never know.

Being a generally untrusting person, I always hesitate to click URLs if I don’t know exactly where they are going. But then I started feeling like I was missing out on stuff. That’s when I put my thinking cap on and wrote this little PowerShell gem:

$url = “https://www.toddklindt.com/sp2016builds”

((Invoke-WebRequest -UseBasicParsing –Uri $url).baseresponse).ResponseUri

This little beauty will take a short URL for any of the common shorteners and tell you what it resolves to. Here it is in action.

image

The URL at the top is the short URL we want to check, and the circled URL below is the secret URL it’s forwarding you to. If you decide it is safe, you can type start $url in PowerShell and it will open up in your default browser.

Once again, PowerShell comes to the rescue. I hope this helps a few of you explore short URLs without fear, and without having to listen to Rick Astley, unless you want to of course.

tk

ShortURL: https://www.toddklindt.com/PoshResolveShortURLS

  
No presence informationTodd O. Klindt5/14/2018 11:07 AMPodcast2 

This week's podcast starts off with Todd talking about a couple of new things he's doing. First his new role, the Chief Evangelist for SysKit. Also, some help he's giving the OneDrive Product Team to update their documentation. After that Shane and Todd talk a bit about MS Build and the upcoming SharePoint Conference. They also touch on GDPR and Cord cutting, and calendars in SharePoint Online. And no self respecting podcast would be complete without Shane going gaga over PowerApps.

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Podcast 388 - No Jury Would Ever Convict Her (Time 0_09_06;07)

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Running Time: 47:07

Links:

ShortURL: http://www.toddklindt.com/Podcast388

  
No presence informationTodd O. Klindt5/9/2018 3:28 PM2 

For the last few months, the folks at SysKit and I have been keeping a secret. I’ve been a fan of their products for years, and they’re the only company I’ve ever let advertise on my blog because of that. A few months ago we realized that we both wanted to work together more and this crazy idea was hatched. Starting May 1st I am officially the Chief Evangelist at Syskit. I will be working with them to deliver the message about their products, and connect them more to their customers. It lets me do two things I love, playing with SysKit products, and hanging out with SharePoint Admins, some of my favorite, hardest working, best looking people on the planet. Smile 

You can read the big announcement on the SysKit Blog. What does this all mean? Well, you’ll start seeing some posts about SysKit products and events here on my blog, and you’ll see me showing up at events with them and probably on their blog from time to time.

My role with SysKit is a part-time role, so I will still spend plenty of time getting my hands dirty in SharePoint and Office 365 environments of all shapes and sizes. This will help me keep in touch with the products and how people are using them.

I’m really excited about working with SysKit and I’m grateful that they’ve given me this opportunity. If you have any feedback on any SysKit products, please let me know.

tk

ShortURL: https://www.toddklindt.com/SysKitChiefEvangelist

  
No presence informationTodd O. Klindt5/3/2018 4:41 PMPodcast0 

Technical difficulties rear their ugly head during this week's podcast. Shane and Todd power through it though and cover this week's updates SharePoint Online storage, Office 365 Multi-Geo support, Microsoft Forms, and file viewers in OneDrive. They also cover two new blog posts from Todd, and new PowerApps videos from Shane.

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Podcast 387 - It Will Always be Chest Hair to Me (Time 0_36_03;02)

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Running Time: 51:38

Links:

06:58 Log Parser Lizard
11:27 Get global data location controls with Multi-Geo Capabilities in Office 365
17:42 Updated endpoints and web services
20:21 Increase in SharePoint Online storage allocation
23:00 Huge Increase in Office 365 Storage
25:47 Use OneDrive Client instead of Explorer View or Map Network Drive
31:39 New File Viewers for OneDrive, SharePoint and Teams
37:25 PowerApps Flyout menus, floating buttons, and X Y Controls
38:00 YouTube Deck in PowerApps
49:15 Cloud Friday Nashville
49:15 ​SPS Nashville
49:15 SPS Montreal
49:15 SPS Charlotte
49:15 SharePoint Saturday New England 2018
50:32 SharePoint North America Conference
51:00 SharePoint Administration Day Camp
51:30 SPTechCon Boston

ShortURL: http://www.toddklindt.com/Podcast387

  
No presence informationTodd O. Klindt5/2/2018 9:18 AMOneDrive10 

In the past few weeks I've had a couple of conversations with customers that have wanted to use some old school solutions for modern day problems, with Office 365. One was trying to get Explorer View to work, the other was trying to map a network drive to a document library. Neither were having much luck. That's when I stepped in with what was probably an unappreciated answer, "Use the OneDrive Sync client instead."

OneDrive has taken its share of knocks over the years, and much of that was well earned. In the last two or three years, the OneDrive team has put on both their thinking caps, and their heavy leather working gloves and they've really made things happen. While I struggle to find a single area of improvement that I like the most, the sync client has got to be right up there. Most, if not all of the frustrating, infuriating, sync issues have been cleared up. And it can sync OneDrive Consumer, on-prem SharePoint MySites, and multiple Office 365 tenants. Most importantly, late last year, it added on-demand sync functionality to the Next Generation Sync Client (NGSC). This allows the sync client to see all of the files in the team site, document library, or whatever, without actually downloading the files and taking up local space. Here is how multiple libraries looks in Explorer:

image

All of those locations are under the purview of OneDrive’s Next Gen Sync Client.

Back to my customers. In the first situation, the customer wanted to get Explorer View to work because that was the way they were most comfortable uploading a bunch of files to SharePoint. They wanted to lasso a bunch of files in Windows Explorer, Ctrl-C copy them, open up a SharePoint Document Library in Explorer View, and Ctrl-V paste them in. I can't blame them. That method has worked for the last decade, and if it ain't broke, don't fix it. Except it is broken, sort of. Explorer View uses two technologies, WebDAV and FPRPC. Neither of which has aged well. And they behave differently depending on which version of Windows you have installed, and which version of Office you have installed. It's unreliable at its best, and downright infuriating at its worst. And if you're using Edge, it flat out won't work at all.

Instead of having their business balance on that decade old cobbled together technology, I recommended they use the OneDrive NGSC to accomplish this. I told them to sync it with the library where they want to upload the files. That will expose the document library to Windows, in Explorer, PowerShell, and anything else they want to run. Now they can use their lasso technique in Explorer to upload files, and do it with a current, maintained, and mostly reliable client, the OneDrive NGSC. Once the files are copied into the local OneDrive location, the NGSC will sync them up to Office 365. After that's finished the user can choose to no longer sync that folder, or keep syncing it, but free up space by making those files "Cloud Only" with OneDrive.

The other scenario was mapping a network drive to SharePoint. This customer didn't want to do a one time operation like the Explorer View customer above. They wanted a quick, easy link to their frequently used SharePoint documents, and in the familiar Explorer interface. Again, I can't blame them for that. It's familiar, and it works well. Except it doesn't sometimes. Once again, if you're using Edge, mapping as a network drive is not supported. Fortunately, if you have the OneDrive NGSC installed, you can use the same technic we used above, to mimic this behavior. Use OneDrive's "Sync" to sync with all of the locations you would have mapped as network drives. When you do they'll show up in Explorer and your file system. You'll be able to use them however you'd like. Since the OneDrive NGSC supports on-demand sync this won't take up extra space on your local machine, just like mapping as a network drive didn't.

I hope that helps a little.

tk

ShortURL: https://www.toddklindt.com/UseOneDriveSyncClient

  
No presence informationTodd O. Klindt4/30/2018 11:09 AMOffice 3652 

The cloud has come a long way in the last few years. One of the ways it has improved, though not fast enough in my opinion, is storage allocation or quotas. Cloud storage providers have struggled with how to offer increasing amounts of storage in a way that is financially viable for them. The 1 TB package I could buy from Dropbox, OneDrive, or Google Drive 3 years ago is the same today, despite the fact that physical storage itself is cheaper, and storage needs and cloud storage reliance have increased.

I am happy to report that in one area, Microsoft is getting it right. Very right. Before Friday your Office 365 tenant got 1 TB of storage, plus .5 GB for each user license. This was storage you could assign to any of your SharePoint Online site collections outside of OneDrive for Business. If you had 25 user licenses you had 1012.5 GB of storage in your tenant, 12.5 GB from your licenses (25 x 0.5 GB) and the 1 TB each tenant gets. Each user also gets 1 TB in their personal OneDrive, but that’s a different pool of storage. On April 27th, 2018, in the blog post Increase in SharePoint Online storage allocation, Aaron Rimmer the Product Marketing Group Manager for OneDrive at Microsoft, outlined the changes to SharePoint Online’s storage allocation. Starting on July 1st, 2018, every Office 365 tenant (except kiosk and F1 tenants) will still get their initial 1 TB, but they will also get a staggering 10 GB of storage for each licensed user. That’s a 20x increase! Now, that 25 user tenant would have 1500 GB of storage, up from the current 1012.5 GB.

As someone that is a happy Office 365 Administrator what do you need to do to take advantage of this storage windfall? Two things, first send me $5 via PayPal. Okay, maybe not that. Smile  The second step, well, you’re already doing the second step. Do nothing. Microsoft will start rolling this out July 1st, 2018, and they plan to have the roll out completed by August 1st, 2018. Your only job now is to sit back, relax, and start planning on how you’re going to take advantage of all of that storage you’re going to be getting. May I suggest more funny cat videos?

tk

ShortURL: https://www.toddklindt.com/O365StorageIncrease

  
No presence informationTodd O. Klindt4/27/2018 1:30 PMPodcast0 
  
No presence informationTodd O. Klindt4/19/2018 4:23 PMPodcast0 

Today's show is full of great tech topics. Shane and Todd cover Tesla and a how Microsoft is getting rid of passwords (not really). They cover Office 365's new multi-geo support, and how secure your data in the cloud is from the government's prying eyes. Then Shane doesn't mean to go off on a rant, but he goes off on a rant about deceptive headlines and how it grinds his gears. All that any why politicians might not be as out of touch about technology as you think they are.

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Podcast 385 - Extension Cord on the Wireless Keyboard (Time 0_03_24;15)

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Running Time: 49:08

Links:

09:54 Password-less Sign-In to Windows 10 & Azure AD using FIDO2 is coming soon
18:25 Multi-Geo Capabilities in OneDrive and SharePoint Online in Office 365
20:48 Supreme Court rules Microsoft privacy dispute moot
21:00 Supreme Court Drops Case Pitting Justice Department Against Microsoft
25:37 Utah Sen. Orrin Hatch calls foul on media coverage of Zuckerberg hearing
37:30 Cisco Spark is now Cisco Webex Teams
43:32 Getting started with Azure SQL DBaaS
43:35 Build a PowerApps Quiz app
44:00 Creating AD User from a template with PowerShell
45:19 Cloud Friday Nashville
45:20 ​SPS Nashville
45:30 SPS Montreal
45:45 SPS Charlotte
45:49 SharePoint North America Conference
45:50 SharePoint Administration Day Camp
46:00 SPTechCon Boston

ShortURL: http://www.toddklindt.com/Podcast385

  
No presence informationTodd O. Klindt4/16/2018 10:50 PMPowerShell1 

Whew, that’s quite a mouthful.

A month ago I did a guest video for Shane’s YouTube Channel on how to create Windows Active Directory users from a CSV file. It was well received, and one of the viewers left a comment asking how to do that, but copy an existing user when you create a new user. I thought that was an interesting topic, so I made a second view covering that.

image

Creating AD Users from a template with PowerShell

I reference a couple of files in the video.

Here is a file with all PowerShell commands I ran.

Here is the PowerShell transcript from the video.

As much as it pains me to send people to Shane’s channel, if you’re interested in PowerShell and creating users, check out my video.

tk

ShortURL: https://www.toddklindt.com/PoshCopyADUser

  
No presence informationTodd O. Klindt4/13/2018 9:56 AMSpeaking0 

I’ve had a busy month or so of travel, going to the MVP Summit and being honored to speak at SPS Omaha. All of those things are in the rear-view mirror. The next big event for me, really for all of us, is the SharePoint Conference North America.

I could go on and on about how great it’s going to be. Microsoft will be there in full force. Answering our questions, showing us cool stuff, giving away annoying screeching monkeys, and just generally making things fun. There’s also going to be a bunch of the best non-Microsoft folks there. Presenters, sponsors, you name it. It would be a shame if you missed it all.

Speaking of missing it all, here is my schedule during the event. I’ll update it as I add new things:

Monday, May 21st - 11:00 - 11:30 Keynote Wrapup (Expo Hall Podcasting Booth)

Monday, May 21st - 3:00 – 4:00 SharePoint Migration, What Did I Get Myself Into? (Room 123)

Monday, May 21st - 5:15 – 6:30 SharePint, Reception in the Expo Hall

Tuesday, May 22nd – 8:30 – 9:30 Life as a SharePoint Administrator in the Year 2018 (Room 123)

Tuesday, May 22nd - 10:45 - 11:30 Hangout with me at the SysKit Booth in the Expo Hall (Booth 423)

Tuesday May 22nd - 5:00 – 6:30 Record Podcast in the Expo Hall​

Tuesday, May 22nd – 8:00 – ???? Attendee Pool-side Party

Wednesday, May 23rd – 9:45 – 10:45

Cloud Authentication Options for Hybrid Environments (Room 121)​

Thursday, May 24th - 9:00 – 4:00 SharePoint Administration Day Camp workshop (Room 112)

You can download the full conference schedule from here.

Shane and I are also planning on having a Podcast get together at some point. I’ll let you all know when that will be.

Does this sound like too much fun to pass up? Of course it is! If you haven’t already registered (tsk, tsk) don’t fret, there’s still time. Point your favorite browser to the SharePoint Conference NA web site and get Registered. If you use the Discount Code KLINDT you’ll get $50 off, my eternal gratitude, and it’ll make Shane mad. Everybody wins!

If have the unfortunate situation of not being able to join us at SPC NA in person, but still want to join in, here's a link to a live stream of the Keynote.

See you in Vegas,

tk

Download Slides​

ShortURL: https://www.toddklindt.com/SPCNA2018

Edited 4/18 to fix Podcast time

Edited 4/20 to add Authentication session

Edited 5/15 to add Keynote podcast and time at the SysKit booth

Edited 5/20 to add link to Keynote live stream

Edited 5/25 to add download link

  
No presence informationTodd O. Klindt4/12/2018 1:47 PMPodcast0 

Shane's got a new job, and that's how they start out this week's podcast, talking about Shane's new endeavor. After that they talk about Todd's trip to SPS Omaha, and how much fun he had. After all of that they talk about new OneDrive functionality that will help you combat ransomware, new patches for SharePoint, Office 365 endpoints, Windows 3.1 File Manager on Windows 10, and of course, a word or two from Shane's newest love, PowerApps. All that and more this week on Todd and Shane's Cloudy Podcast.

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Podcast 384 - Don't Compliment the Messenger (Time 0_01_25;09)

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Running Time: 50:41

Links:

05:00 I got a new Job, PowerApps911
18:00 Restore your OneDrive
22:00 Announcing: Office 365 endpoint categories and Office 365 IP Address and URL web service
24:00 Windows File Manager (WinFile) is Open Source
26:00 File Manager Primer
27:00 New version of Microsoft's SharePoint Migration Tool
29:00 Download Microsoft SharePoint Migration Assessment Tool
00:34 PowerApps Password Screen
35:00 PowerApps SharePoint Columns
36:00 PowerApps Patch Function
40:00 Pocket Casts Desktop for Windows 10 is a fantastic podcast app
46:00 SPS Vancouver
47:00 Cloud Friday Nashville
47:00 ​SPS Nashville
47:00 SPS Montreal Call for Speakers
47:00 SPS Charlotte
48:00 SharePoint North America Conference
48:10 SharePoint Administration Day Camp
48:20 SPTechCon Boston

ShortURL: http://www.toddklindt.com/Podcast384

  
No presence informationTodd O. Klindt4/10/2018 2:37 PMPodcast0 

This week's podcast starts with the heroic tale of Todd winning a war against the Distributed Cache service. After all the accolades, Shane and Todd go on to talk about PowerShell History, a new way to consume DNS, the new SharePoint Online Admin Center, oh, and maybe a little about PowerApps.

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Podcast 383 - Against the Conventional Thought Process (Time 0_18_22;21)

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Running Time: 49:07

Links:

09:17 Manage the Distributed Cache service in SharePoint Server
18:44 Working with PowerShell History
23:29 CloudFlare DNS
25:25 1.1.1.1: Cloudflare's new DNS attracting 'gigabits per second' of rubbish
28:44 A PowerShell Module for with 1.1.1.1''s DNS over HTTPS (DoH) Web Service
30:25 Word to MarkDown
33:23 PowerApps Performance Considerations
37:06 PowerApps Timer Control
38:42 SharePoint Admin Center preview
42:45 SPS Vancouver
42:46 Cloud Friday Nashville
42:47 ​SPS Nashville
42:48 SPS Montreal Call for Speakers
42:49 SPS Charlotte
43:05 SPS Omaha
44:25 SharePoint North America Conference
44:26 SharePoint Administration Day Camp
47:55 SPTechCon Boston

ShortURL: http://www.toddklindt.com/Podcast383

  
No presence informationTodd O. Klindt4/9/2018 3:01 PMPodcast0 

Hub sites, Azure AD, and PowerApps, oh my! In this episode Todd and Shane talk about Azure AD topologies and new PowerShell cmdlets for it. Not to be left out, they also talk about using PowerShell with IIS. They wrap things up talking about PowerApps and some more crazy things you can do with them that Shane found.

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Podcast 382 - Idiot Feature (Time 0_00_23;25)

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Running Time: 49:26

Links:

09:20 Organize your intranet with SharePoint hub sites
13:29 Azure Active Directory PowerShell for Graph - Public Preview
17:10 Topologies for Azure AD Connect
20:54 Web Server (IIS) Administration Cmdlets in Windows PowerShell
23:54 PowerApps: Better error handling and NULL values
25:21 Connect on-prem data to Office 365
29:33 PowerApps Shopping Cart
32:07 PowerApps Filter Function
32:35 Dollars for Data
43:45 SPS Vancouver
43:46 Cloud Friday Nashville
43:47 ​SPS Nashville
43:48 SPS Montreal Call for Speakers
43:49 SPS Charlotte
44:36 SPS Omaha
45:28 SharePoint North America Conference
45:29 SharePoint Administration Day Camp
47:21 SPTechCon Boston

ShortURL: http://www.toddklindt.com/Podcast382

  
No presence informationTodd O. Klindt3/28/2018 9:02 AMPodcast0 
  
No presence informationTodd O. Klindt3/22/2018 9:38 AMPodcast0 

In this episode Executive Producer Lori Gowin steps up and co-hosts with Shane while Todd is busy working on his tan. The show opens with an interview of Lori and a discussion of Power BI, what makes it awesome, who is using it, and how that is Lori's path as she transitions beyond SharePoint. Pretty interesting stuff straight from the horse's mouth.

With that perfect interview in the books the team then tackles the AMD security flaw along with the shenanigans that were involved, a way for you to provide some feedback to Microsoft on SharePoint documentation, and of course PowerApps. Always, PowerApps!

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Podcast 380 - Thank God Todd Wasn't Here (Time 0_00_20;06)

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Running Time: 43:38

Links:

19:16 SharePoint Who is in and who is out?
26:58 Stephen Hawking has passed away at 76 :(
25:01 New AMD security flaw
28:37 PowerApps adding attachments to SharePoint lists
30:56 Provide Feedback on SharePoint Documentation
35:17 PowerApps On premises data gateway
35:18 Create Hyper-V VMs with PowerShell

ShortURL: http://www.toddklindt.com/Podcast380

  
No presence informationTodd O. Klindt3/20/2018 11:15 AMPodcast0 
  
No presence informationTodd O. Klindt3/9/2018 9:21 AMPodcast0 
  
No presence informationTodd O. Klindt3/4/2018 4:24 PMPowerShell1 

In my quest to become a minor YouTube celebrity, I recently graced Shane’s YouTube channel with a video. This video covers how to use PowerShell to create Active Directory users. It’s a live action video version of this blog post. I start out by showing how to add AD support to PowerShell, and my big finish is working through a CSV file and creating a bunch of users. I hope I didn’t spoil the ending for you.

image

Here’s a link to the video.

I reference some files in the video, here they are:

Enjoy. Watch the video. Watch it twice. Leave a comment and let me know what you thought of it.

tk

ShortURL: https://www.toddklindt.com/PoshIntroAD

  
No presence informationTodd O. Klindt2/27/2018 3:27 PM2 

In this week's Podcast Todd and Shane cover the solution to a Search problem Shane had. The answer was on Todd's blog! Then they talk about Modern SharePoint, and why YOU should care. Then they veer a little off topic and talk about mobile connectivity. Shane talks about 5G access from AT&T, and Todd talks about another Raspberry Pi project he's been working on to help his connectivity while he's on the road. They finish up talking about some videos Shane has done, a big break for Bill Gates, and a toilet that flushes itself by the sound of your voice.

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Podcast 377 - Need a Bigger Coffin (Time 0_00_20;05)

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Running Time: 47:57

Links:

Search Issue
What is Modern SharePoint and Why Should I care?
5G coming to a dozen cities this year from ATT
Raspberry Pi travel AP
PowerApps Visual for PowerBI
PowerShell Create a Scheduled Task
SharePoint and starting your migration
Alexa controlled Toilet
Bill Gates to cameo on Big Bang Theory
Windows Phone is dead
Be smart with websites
Cloud Friday Nashville
SPS Nashville
SPS Montreal Call for Speakers
SPS Charlotte
SPS Vancouver
SPS Omaha
SharePoint North America Conference
SharePoint Administration Day Camp
SPTechCon Boston
SPTechCon Call for speakers

ShortURL: http://www.toddklindt.com/Podcast377

  
No presence informationTodd O. Klindt2/20/2018 10:27 AMPodcast; Netcast0 
  
No presence informationTodd O. Klindt2/12/2018 10:45 AM0 

Want to upload pictures of your employees to SharePoint 2016 but not do battle with MIM? Then you're in luck! Todd and Shane discuss that and a whole lot more this week. They discuss how to trick SharePoint into being an employee directory, how to get OneDrive for Business for free, how to HTTPS-ify your SharePoint servers, how to install Office Online Server, and why Shane's kid is good at soccer.

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Podcast 375 - Help Future You Out (Time 0_01_00;00)

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Running Time: 54:25

Links:

08:55 User Profile Picture Import with Active Directory Import(Dirsync)
09:00 Using PowerShell to import Profile Photos when using Active Directory Import and SharePoint Server 2013/2016/2019
12:10 How to build a great Employee Directory in Office 365 & SharePoint
13:50 Free OneDrive until your existing contract runs out
17:40 Automatically Redirect HTTP requests to HTTPS on IIS 7 using URL Rewrite 2.0
23:16 How to install Office Online Server for SharePoint 2016 (OOS)
24:20 How to Create a Windows PowerShell Profile
26:00 Video of PowerShell Profiles
53:22 Shane on another Podcast
51:10 SharePoint North America Conference
52:00 SharePoint Administration Day Camp
52:18 SPTechCon Boston
52:30 Call for speakers
52:48 PowerApps Webinar

ShortURL: http://www.toddklindt.com/Podcast375

  
No presence informationTodd Klindt2/5/2018 4:49 PMPodcast0 
  
No presence informationTodd Klindt2/2/2018 8:25 AMSharePoint 2016; Speaking2 

The new year is upon us. This means the conference season is in full swing. There are a ton of great SharePoint and Office 365 conferences this year, and some of them are even letting me participate, restraining orders be damned! The first one, and maybe the biggest one, is the SharePoint Conference North America. It has been four, very long, years since the SharePoint Community has descended on Las Vegas and showed it what a tech community is really like.

If you haven’t already seen all the gooey details about the 2018 SPC, let me explain. There’s too much, let me sum up. The festivities are taking place May 21 – 23, 2018 at the MGM Grand in Las Vegas. There are also optional workshops the weekend before and a couple of days after.

SPCNA_BeThere_1012x506_KLINDT

And speaking of workshops, my sidekick and I, Shane Young, will be doing an all day workshop on Thursday May 24th. It will cover SharePoint Administration in the year 2018. We’ll cover SharePoint Server, Hybrid Scenarios, Office 365, the works. We’ve even written a few new jokes, so you know we’re serious about this thing.

We’ll also be doing a couple of sessions, so once you get registered, make sure to add them to your schedule.

We haven’t finalized it yet, but we’ll also be having some sort of a get together. Probably one of the mornings. The idea is that if you’ve seen us on YouTube, or read our blogs this is your chance to come up and say Hi and see if Shane really is as annoying in person as he appears on the Internet. (He is)

While SPC will be great, it won’t be the same without YOU there. If you haven’t already, go to https://www.sharepointna.com and get yourself registered. If you use the Promo code KLINDT, then I get $50, you get $50, and you also get a big bear hug, or a firm handshake from me. Your choice.

Join me at SPC. I’ll be there. Will you?

tk

ShortURL: http://www.toddklindt.com/BeThere

  
No presence informationTodd Klindt1/29/2018 8:34 AMPodcast0 

Pulled patches and file restores in OneDrive start out this week's podcast. Shane updates us on the latest development in the YouTube advertising wars, and Todd shows you a way to have kittens brighten your day. They end the podcast by talking about Amazon's new store, and how funny it is.

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Podcast 373 - Jiggled Some Wires (Time 0_00_36;17)

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Running Time: 44:57

Links:

3:00 Web site test
07:09 January 2018 Patch for Office Online Server pulled
11:30 Announcing New OneDrive for Business feature: Files Restore
16:18 YouTube going through a change
21:33 Amazon opens the supermarket with no lines
31:10 Emergency Kitten
33:45 Mine ETH
39:59 Todd's Charity drive.
41:56 SharePoint North America Conference – Promo code KLINDT
43:22 SPTechCon Boston

ShortURL: http://www.toddklindt.com/Podcast373

  
No presence informationTodd Klindt1/22/2018 9:43 AMPodcast0 

This week's podcast covers a lot. Todd starts things off by talking about a change he's making to his blog, and one of his favorite topics, SharePoint patches. Shane follows up with some trouble he's had with Hyper-V and the Cisco VPN client. After that they discuss the release of PowerShell Core, Microsoft's SharePoint Migration Tool, OneDrive, SnagIt, and how you can win a pass to the SharePoint Conference in May.

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Video File

Podcast 372 - Old Bras (Time 0_02_59;18)

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Running Time: 44:20

Links:

09:15 Introduction to PowerApps Variables
11:53 Hardware Manufacturer Statements and Guidance for Meltdown/Spectre
17:12 PowerShell Core 6.0: Generally Available (GA) and Supported!
25:09 General Availability of the SharePoint Migration Tool
26:51 Tweet Bill Baer to win a bag
29:49 SnagIt from TechSmith
35:40 Microsoft to add file restore to OneDrive for Business starting in late January
37:50 Microsoft took more cloud share from AWS
39:53 Todd's Charity drive.
41:36 SharePoint North America Conference
42:00 SharePoint Administration Day Camp

ShortURL: http://www.toddklindt.com/Podcast372

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