Skip Ribbon Commands
Skip to main content
  
  
  
Category
  
  
Edit
Body
  
No presence informationTodd O. Klindt4/17/2015 9:49 PMNetcast2 


Tonight's episode showcases the comedic stylings and PowerShell prowess of PowerShell MVP, Jeff Hicks. He talks about all things PowerShell and puts up with me for nearly an hour. We talk about a recent series of blog posts that help improve your PowerShell Function writing. There's also some general gushing about how great PowerShell is. Then he tells us what's so darned exciting about DSC, and what it is. In a very anti-climactic ending, I talk about a new app for the Microsoft Band, and some bad experiences I had with Windows Phone.
Audio File

Video File

Podcast 243 - Set-Podcast -Name 'With Jeff Hicks' (Time 0_02_19;17)

YouTube (Subscribe)

Subscribe in iTunes

Podcast Transcription courtesy of CMSWire

Running Time: 1:07:06

Links:

09:50 - Ebook version of a Week of Blog Posts
11:00 - Week of Blog Posts blog post
31:42 - Sapien
40:25 - PowerShell Summit
51:45- Petri.com
53:57 - Microsoft Band app for Windows
59:40 - Windows Phone Recovery Tool
1:01:54 - SharePoint Evolution
1:02:20 - Microsoft Ignite
1:03:15 - PowerShell booth at Microsoft Ignite
1:03:42 - Alaska SharePoint User Group
1:04:25 - Mississippi PowerShell User Group
1:05:11 - SharePointalooza

Brought to you by Rackspace

ShortURL: http://www.toddklindt.com/Podcast243

  
No presence informationTodd O. Klindt4/17/2015 11:24 AMSharePoint 20136 

Like last Patch Tuesday, and many Patch Tuesdays before it, this Patch Tuesday SharePoint 2013 was blessed with an update, the April 2015 CU. There are a few outstanding Regressions from previous SharePoint 2013 CUs, so folks jumped on it pretty quickly.

Turns out the April 2015 CU has a dark side.

A year ago, when SP1 came out, it had some problems. I cover them in my blog post “Don’t Install SharePoint 2013 Service Pack 1” The original version of SP1 had this nasty bug where it prevented the installation of subsequent patches. That’s a bad thing. Microsoft cleaned everything up and rereleased SP1 without that issue. They also advised that if you were an MSDN or Volume License customer, the SharePoint 2013 installation ISO that included Service Pack 1 was not affected by that. Whew! It was still a bit confusing, as the Bad SP1 and the Good SP1 looked the same to a SharePoint administrator trying to fix the problem. I talk about how to tell them apart in this blog post, “How to tell which Service Pack 1 you have installed on SharePoint 2013” I thought that was the end of the story.

Turns out I was wrong.

The April 2015 CU is the first SharePoint 2013 CU that requires Service Pack 1 be installed. The previous CUs required either Service Pack 1 or the March 2013 CU. If the installer found either of those installed, it continued on. With the April 2015 CU only Service Pack 1 could scratch that itch. And the different versions of Service Pack 1 leave different footprints on your SharePoint farm. One scratches the April 2015 CU itch, one does not.

If you installed your SharePoint farm with the ISO media that included Service Pack 1, you will not be able to install the April 2015 CU. The April 2015 CU does not recognize that the required bits are in place and its installation will fail. Fortunately, there is a workaround. If you reinstall the stand alone Service Pack 1 (download links here) you’ll then be able to install the April 2015 CU. This is the fix even if you’re running a post Service Pack 1 CU. So if you’re currently sitting at the November 2014 CU and you want to install the April 2015 CU, you have to reinstall Service Pack 1 first. Obviously, right? Smile 

One tricky aspect of this is language packs. They have the same issue. And since CUs also patch the language packs, a language pack can cause the April 2015 CU to break as well. For instance, if you installed English SharePoint 2013 (wonky ISO or not), put Service Pack 1 on it, then installed the German Language Pack that came with Service Pack 1, the April 2015 CU won’t install. Not because the base SharePoint (in this case English) doesn’t have the correct Service Pack 1, or even because the CU hates German, but because the Language Pack (German) doesn’t have the correct Service Pack 1. In this case the fix is to reinstall (or repair) Service Pack 1 for the Language Pack, then take another swing at the April 2015 CU.

Hopefully this has helped. I want to give shouts out to Stefan Goßner, Trevor Seward, and Brian Lalancette. We had a good discussion on Twitter about this this morning that helped flesh out the details.

tk

ShortURL: http://www.toddklindt.com/Apr2015CUNoBueno

  
No presence informationTodd O. Klindt4/9/2015 4:42 PMNetcast0 

In this Podcast I talk about more improvements I want to make. Then I spend some time talking about how you can win a ticket to the AvePoint Red party at Ignite next month. Next I calm everyone's fears about Microsoft dropping AppFabric support. I talk about something that might prevent you from downloading our beloved SharePoint patches. Then I talk about some new gadgets that you can pick up, and I finished up by mentioning Microsoft's Work and Play Bundle that offers an unbelievable discount on some Microsoft products you're probably already buying.

Audio File

Video File

Podcast 242 - Face West and Swear (Time 0_06_35;00)

YouTube (Subscribe)

Podcast Transcription courtesy of CMSWire

Running Time: 47:41

Links:

01:16 First transcription
11:03 Jeff Hicks blog
13:26 - Win a ticket to the AvePoint Red Party at Ignite
18:19 - Microsoft AppFabric 1.1 for Windows Server Ends Support 4/2/2016
26:30 - Paul Thurrott's Surface 3 review
33:19 - Miracast works now with Amazon Fire TV Stick
35:20 - Sling TV
36:43 - Microsoft Work and Play Bundle
37:00 - Order Microsoft Work and Play and the Microsoft Online Store
39:32 - How To Write PowerShell Functions in a Week of Blog Posts

Brought to you by Rackspace

ShortURL: http://www.toddklindt.com/Podcast242

  
No presence informationTodd O. Klindt4/6/2015 4:05 PMPowerShell; SharePoint 20132 

If you’re a reader of this blog you know I’m absolutely ga-ga over PowerShell. Being able to use PowerShell is one of my favorite parts of my job. I love the challenge, and ultimately the satisfaction of using it to solve SharePoint administration problems that come up. If you haven’t embraced PowerShell, you’re missing out. It’s like having chocolate, and not mixing it with peanut butter.

After I got to a certain level of proficiency in PowerShell (I was only swearing at it every other day instead of every single day) I fell into a rut and I got lazy. I would write dazzling one-liners that could do things, and once in a while I’d even string a couple of those together and save them out to a .PS1 file that I could run later. But I sort of stopped there. I was able to get things done, so my learning sort of tapered off. A few months ago I decided I need to up my PowerShell skills and I started turning all of those various and sundry PS1 files into functions in a .PSM1 file. My skill at writing functions is weak, so I found myself doing the same HELP and Bing searches over and over.

Then last week happened.

Several of my favorite PowerShell bloggers/tweeters/experts put together a PSBlogWeek. For six solid days they each wrote one blog post on PowerShell functions, walking through how to make them, and some great things to do to make them better after you have them. While I hope you check them all out, and read them all start to finish, I’m selfishly writing this blog post so I’ll have them all in one place where I can reference them. They’re really good.

Here’s the list of blog posts, in order:

Blogger Article
Francois-Xavier Cat Standard and Advanced PowerShell functions
Mike F Robbins PowerShell Advanced Functions: Can we build them better? With parameter validation, yes we can!
Adam Bertram #PSBlogWeek – Dynamic Parameters and Parameter Validation
Jeffery Hicks PowerShell Blogging Week: Supporting WhatIf and Confirm
June Blender Advanced Help for Advanced Functions – #PSBlogWeek
Boe Prox A Look at Try/Catch in PowerShell

Thanks for the great blog posts.

tk

ShortURL: http://www.toddklindt.com/psblogweek

  
No presence informationTodd O. Klindt4/3/2015 9:02 AMSharePoint 20132 

I really should have posted this early, but I’m excited to announce I’ll speaking at the SharePoint Evolution Conference in London in a couple of weeks. The Evolution Conference is one of the big ones. A lot of my friends have attended or presented there in previous years and they always RAVE about it. This year, my prayers were answered and the benevolent Steve Smith allowed me the honor or speaking there. Thanks, Steve!

The conference is April 20th - 22nd in London at The Queen Elizabeth II Conference Centre. I told you it was a big deal! My part of the show is first thing Wednesday morning. I’ll be doing a two part session on upgrading from SharePoint 2010 to SharePoint 2013. If you’re still running SharePoint 2010, or heaven forbid, SharePoint 2007, then you should already be planning the upgrade to SharePoint 2013. This session will help.

If you’re in Europe, or heck, even if you’re not, please consider coming to the SharePoint Evolution Conference and joining me and all the other terrific speakers and attendees. And if you do, please find me and introduce yourself and say, “Hi.” I’d love to meet you.

tk

ShortURL: http://www.toddklindt.com/Evo2015

  
No presence informationTodd O. Klindt4/2/2015 2:30 PMNetcast0 

In tonight's Podcast I ask for your opinion on some pieces of the Podcast. Then I talk about some Windows 10 topics. There's a new Preview coming out, and it will be available to more Windows Phones. Then I talk about some weird issues with recent Cumulative Updates. Then I talk about some recent password weirdness.

Audio File

Video File

Podcast 241 - I Might not be Cool Enough (Time 0_24_33;15)

YouTube (Subscribe)

Podcast Transcription courtesy of CMSWire

Running Time: 42:19

Links:

06:23 - Transcription by CMSwire
18:40 - Sign up for Windows Insider
20:15 - Windows 10 preview available for more phones
20:54 Install the Windows Insider app
23:25 Registry settings in recent Cus
25:35 - Process Monitor
33:24 - LastPass
33:58 - KeePass
34:10 - 1Password
37:29 - SharePoint Evolution
38:18 - Microsoft Ignite
39:34 - Mississippi PowerShell User Group
40:25 - SharePointalooza

Brought to you by Rackspace

ShortURL: http://www.toddklindt.com/Podcast241

  
No presence informationTodd O. Klindt3/26/2015 11:53 AMNetcast0 

In this episode I'm joined by Mark Minasi. We wax about all things technology. Mark talks about Office 365 and how it's gotten him excited lately. He talks about OneDrive for Business and some ways a company and can stick their toe in and try it out. We also talk about Windows 10 and what's coming there. It was good to catch up with Mark, and we have a lot of fun chatting.

Audio File

Video File

Podcast 240 - All the SharePoint Goodies Without Any Brains Required at All (Time 0_03_55;10)

YouTube (Subscribe)

Running Time: 56:52

Links:

49:20 - www.minasi.com
50:54 - Pluralsight
52:19 - SharePoint Evolution Conference
54:00 - Microsoft Ignite

Brought to you by Rackspace

ShortURL: http://www.toddklindt.com/Podcast240

  
No presence informationTodd O. Klindt3/20/2015 3:48 PMNetcast0 

Shane and Jonathan take over tonight while I'm out breaking spring. They talk about Office 2016, Tinder, and Gigaom's demise. They finish up about how great I am and how much they both love and respect me. True story!
Audio File

Video File

Podcast 239 - When Dolphins Attack (Time 0_02_57;24)

YouTube (Subscribe)

Running Time: 44:35

Links:

3:07 - Rackspace Promo
3:53 - Work for Shane
05:20 - Office 2016 Preview is live
15:45 - SXSW Tinder users are meeting AVA the AI account promoting a movie
20:50 - Gigaom goes belly up
28:00 - Muscle cars are scary - Hellcat suspend sales
32:00 - Microsoft bug fix for Windows 2003. Yikes!
40:42 - SharePoint Evolution Conference
40:56 - Microsoft Ignite

Brought to you by Rackspace

ShortURL: http://www.toddklindt.com/Podcast239

  
No presence informationTodd O. Klindt3/5/2015 3:13 PMNetcast0 

In tonight's podcast I talk about the new changes to the SharePoint patching model. After all the whining about that is over I tell the good news that I'll be speaking at Ignite in a couple of months. Then I talk about how to get your Claims provider to search for users, and how to find the users in your AD whose passwords are set to expire.

Audio File

Video File

Podcast 238 - I Blacked Out for a Minute (Time 0_06_48;22)

YouTube (Subscribe)

Running Time: 33:32

Links:

02:49 SharePoint patches are no longer in Windows Update
11:00 - I'm speaking at Ignite
11:19 - End-to-End OneDrive for Business Planning, Deployment, Best Practices and Adoption Techniques
14:35 - Upgrade to Microsoft SharePoint 2013 and Ready for Cloud Potential
17:05 - Fixing People Picker for SAML Claims Users Using LDAP
19:30 - LDAP/AD Claims Provider For SharePoint 2013
20:30 - How to find Active Directory users NOT set to PasswordNeverExpires with PowerShell

Brought to you by Rackspace

ShortURL: http://www.toddklindt.com/Podcast238

  
No presence informationTodd O. Klindt3/3/2015 4:44 PMNetcast0 

Shane graciously fills in for me this week while I'm on the road. He does an okay job. He talks about tablets, Yammer, SuperFish, and an idiot relative he has. He finishes up with a story on how to fail and still win big. Not a bad podcast, for Shane.

Audio File

Video File

Podcast 237 - No Oscar For You (Time 0_00_26;18)

YouTube (Subscribe)

Running Time: 32:10

Links:

00:58 - Cloud Platform at Rackspace
02:24 - CMSWire Article
04:10 - How to use Windows Update to Patch your SharePoint Servers
07:40 - Tablet version of Office 2016 available in Beta Store
09:10 - PowerShell Desired State Configuration free training
12:20 - SuperFish is bad
18:00 - Microsoft Band gets new features
19:50 - Microsoft Band SDK Preview
21:14 - How to Fail at Everything and Still Win Big
21:36 - Passion is Bull$#!+
26:23 - Mike Rowe on Following Your Passion

Brought to you by Rackspace

ShortURL: http://www.toddklindt.com/Podcast237

  
No presence informationTodd O. Klindt3/2/2015 1:50 PMSharePoint 20134 

The people have spoken and Microsoft has decided to not include SharePoint server patches in Windows Update.

A couple of weeks ago I blogged that Microsoft had started pushing SharePoint patches out in Windows Update. Then I walked you through the process in this blog post. Today, Stefan Gossner posted on his blog that there were some more changes. Here is the relevant part for us:

As of March 2015, all Office product updates will be offered via Microsoft Update except for non-security updates for server products.

Emphasis mine.

It sounds like they’re going back to the Pre-February 2015 changes. This doesn’t change my guidance that you should not enable Automatic Updates in Windows Update, at least not in Production.

tk

ShortURL: http://www.toddklindt.com/NoSharePointPatchesInWU

  
No presence informationTodd O. Klindt2/20/2015 10:12 AMSharePoint 2010; SharePoint 2013; Sharepoint0 

Edit 3/2/2015 - This has been changed, please read SharePoint Server Patches Are No Longer Published in Windows Update.

Since Microsoft has started pushing out SharePoint patches in Windows Update there has been a lot of confusion from SharePoint Admins about how all this will work. Fear not, intrepid blog readers, we’ll get to the bottom of it. In this blog post I’ll show you how to verify that Windows Update will update SharePoint, in case that’s the way you roll.

We start out with a SharePoint 2013 server, running on Windows 2012. It is not set to allow Windows Update to patch SharePoint, or any other applications for that matter. It is set to “Download Only” for OS patches. When I open up Windows Update (Win + R > wuapp) this is what I see:

2015-02-14_20-26-17 -edit

67 important patches, 66 of which are itching to be installed. Here is the list:

2015-02-14_20-26-52

Notice that it’s all OS patches. If we go back to the first Windows Update screen there is an innocent looking link at the bottom, “Get updates for other Microsoft products. Find out more.” This is the setting that controls whether SharePoint, and other Microsoft products, is updated with Windows Update. Let’s click it. I like clicking.

2015-02-14_20-27-45

Click the Agree box and then Next.

2015-02-14_20-28-14

I want to continue to use my Current Settings, which are “Download Only, don’t install.”

If all goes well then you’ll get this page.

2015-02-14_20-28-36

Now go back to Windows Update and have it check for updates. Remember we had 67 before, so 67 is the number to beat.

2015-02-14_20-30-45

Things are looking up.

2015-02-14_20-33-36

Now there 84 Important patches and a couple of optional updates thrown in for good measure. Let’s see what they are.

2015-02-14_20-34-28 -edit

There they are, the patches inside of the February 2015 CUs. They are checked, so if we had Windows Updates set to automatically install, they would be. Also note right above it there is a SQL Service Pack trying to sneak in. While I’m a SharePoint guy, I’m sure SQL doesn’t like getting updated via Windows Update either. So make sure you look around in here and understand what is going to be patched now.

Let’s go ahead and click Install and get SharePoint up to date.

2015-02-14_20-47-32

There’s the pudding with the proof right in it. SharePoint should continue to work just fine as your servers update themselves. You will need to run the Config Wizard (psconfig) on all of the servers after they’re all patched. Also note that the SharePoint Server patches are in the Office 2013 group in Windows Update. This is the same group that contains the Office 2013 Clients like Word and Excel. If you’re running WSUS make sure you have a separate computer group for your SharePoint servers. You probably do want to push the Office 2013 client updates to your workstations, but you probably don’t want to push them out to SharePoint servers quite as aggressively.

I hope that clears up some of the confusion over the recent change to SharePoint patching. If you have any questions or comments, leave them in the comment box below.

tk

ShortURL: http://www.toddklindt.com/EnableSharePointPatchesInWu

Edit 3/2/2015 - This has been changed, please read SharePoint Server Patches Are No Longer Published in Windows Update.

  
No presence informationTodd O. Klindt2/19/2015 8:59 AMNetcast0 

Tonight's Podcast is a milestone. I bring in my first, non-Shane guest, Bill Baer (Blog|Twitter). Bill is a Senior Product Manager for SharePoint at Microsoft. Bill and I wax nostalgically about the crazy ride SharePoint has been. Then Bill talks about how great Ignite is going to be, especially for SharePoint folks. SharePoint 2016 has been a big topic on everyone's mind lately and Bill tells us all he can about it. Next we talk about the big changes to SharePoint patching and Bill tries to make it sound like a good thing. :) After Bill signs off I talk a bit about Windows 10 for phones, and how the upgrade went for me. Spoiler alert, not great.

Audio File

Video File

2015-02-19_8-53-47

YouTube (Subscribe)

Running Time: 58:45

Links:

  1. 07:00 - The SharePoint Journey
  2. 17:35 - Top 3 sessions to learn more about SharePoint Server 2016 at Microsoft Ignite
  3. 29:00 - Customer Feedback for SharePoint Server
  4. 46:04 - SharePoint Patches are Now Part of Windows Update, For Real!
  5. 54:35 - Windows 10 Technical Preview for phones now available to download!

Brought to you by Rackspace

ShortURL: http://www.toddklindt.com/Podcast236

  
No presence informationTodd O. Klindt2/16/2015 10:17 AMNetcast0 

We filmed this Podcast live at SPTechCon in Austin. Shane joined in the fun. The audio is a little rough, though. Sorry. He and I chat about the future of SharePoint and what it means for us and businesses. We move to Windows 10 and my addiction to gadgets. Then he gets me into trouble with my wife and makes me tell a story about a spanking I got as a child. Good times for everyone involved.

Audio File

Video File

Podcast 235 - Pipe Dream, Unicorns, and Pixy Dust (Time 0_24_07;10)

YouTube (Subscribe)

Running Time: 51:18

Links:

18:35 - How to upgrade to Windows 10 via Windows Update
30:00 - Toshiba Encore Mini Unboxing Video

Brought to you by Rackspace

ShortURL: http://www.toddklindt.com/Podcast235

  
No presence informationTodd O. Klindt2/12/2015 2:35 PMSharePoint 2010; SharePoint 201321 

Edit 3/2/2015 - This has been changed, please read SharePoint Server Patches Are No Longer Published in Windows Update.

Starting with the February 2015 CUs, all the SharePoint patches will try to sneak onto your unsuspecting SharePoint servers via Windows Update. Here’s a snippet from Stefan Goßner’s blog post on the matter:

“Be aware that starting with February 2015 CU SharePoint Product Updates including non-security product updates will be made available via Windows Update.”

He included a screenshot to really drive home the horror. Here’s my version of this:

image

Not only do the SharePoint patches show up in Windows Update, they show up as Important updates. That means Windows Update will install them when it gets a chance without warning you at all. As a guy that maintains a wiki whose sole purpose in life is to document problems with SharePoint patches, this gives me the willies. The files highlighted above are the same files that would be installed if you installed the February 2015 CU packages. The CU just puts them in one (or two) big files. What does this mean for you, the harried SharePoint administrator? Allow me to address that in the form of Frequently Asked Questions, that I actually have not actually been asked.

Q1) Is this real? Are you fooling me? Am I on TV? Where are the cameras?

A2) I assure you, this is all real. No screenshots were harmed in the making of this blog post.

Q2) How does this impact my Windows Update settings on my SharePoint servers? I’m scared, hold me!

A2) My lawyers have advised me that cuddling with my readers is strictly forbidden. No exceptions. However, I can help with the Windows Update settings part. Because of problems I’ve had in the past, for years I have recommended not allowing Windows Update to automatically update your SharePoint servers. I set all of mine to “Download only.” This only reinforces my feelings on that. Of course then you have to be diligent about going in and manually installing the patches on all of your servers, every. single. month. That’s a lot to remember.

A better solution is to start using Windows Server Update Services (WSUS) to distribute Windows and SharePoint patches to your servers. This gives you central patching control of all of your servers. In my opinion it’s better than not patching your servers and it’s better than letting SharePoint get patched every month.

Q3) If these patches are installed via Windows Update do I still need to run the Config Wizard after they’re installed?

A3) Absolutely. This requirement has not changed. SharePoint will run, mostly happily, with the binaries updated but without having run the Config Wizard. It’s not a great place to be in, but it will work. You shouldn’t have to worry about your SharePoint farm falling on its face immediately after the patch is installed, at least not because of the Config Wizard hasn’t been run. However, to prevent weird issues from popping up, it’s best to run the Config Wizard as soon as possible after any patch is installed.

Those are all of the phony FAQs I can dream up for now. If you have more questions, throw them in the comments below. I may add them to the article.

Thanks, and happy patching, intentional or not. Smile

tk

ShortURL: http://www.toddklindt.com/SharePointPatchesInWU

Edit 3/2/2015 - This has been changed, please read SharePoint Server Patches Are No Longer Published in Windows Update.

  
No presence informationTodd O. Klindt2/7/2015 10:24 PMPowerShell0 

I decided to blog this little nugget because everything I found on the web was exactly the opposite of what I wanted to do. Usually when someone is using PowerShell to look for users in the context of the PasswordNeverExpires property, they’re looking for users where PasswordNeverExpires is set to True and they want to set it to False. It’s generally understood that having passwords never expire is a security risk, so most of the time people want to hunt those accounts down. But you know me, I love a good PowerShell challenge and this week someone needed to find all the accounts where the passwords were allowed to expire, so I stepped up to the plate.

First, just for completeness I’ll include how to do the opposite of what I wanted to do:

Search-ADAccount -PasswordNeverExpires | select SamAccountName, UserPrincipalName

That will return all of the users in your domain whose accounts are set so their passwords never expire. In most cases, these accounts are hunted down and set so their passwords do expire.

If PowerShell can’t find the Search-ADAccount cmdlet make sure the Active Directory module is installed. If it’s not, use this command to install it:

Add-WindowsFeature RSAT-AD-PowerShell

Then make sure it’s loaded in your PowerShell host:

Import-Module ActiveDirectory

With that out of the way, how do we do the opposite, the thing I really needed to do? How do we find accounts that are NOT set to have their passwords never expire? It took some backward thinking, but here’s what I came up with:

Get-ADUser -Filter 'PasswordNeverExpires -eq $false' -SearchBase "CN=Users,DC=contoso,DC=com" | select name

If you’d like to see how many it is, you can use Count property like this:

(Get-ADUser -Filter 'PasswordNeverExpires -eq $false' -SearchBase "CN=Users,DC=contoso,DC=com").Count

And if, for some silly reason, you want to set these accounts so that PasswordNeverExpires is set to True you could do it like this:

Get-ADUser -Filter 'PasswordNeverExpires -eq $false' -SearchBase "CN=Users,DC=contoso,DC=com" | Set-ADUser -PasswordNeverExpires $true

Make sure you understand the security repercussions of this before you do it. In most cases this is a bad thing, but there are exceptions.

tk

ShortURL: http://www.toddklindt.com/PoshPasswordExpires

  
No presence informationTodd O. Klindt2/5/2015 8:40 AMNetcast0 

In tonight's episode I talk about some big new announcements in SharePoint land. First, Microsoft puts to rest any rumors about whether there will be another version of on-premises SharePoint. Spoiler alert, there will be. It's coming later this year. The next version of SharePoint will be discussed at Ignite this summer and we talk about that some. We follow that up with a lively discussion on newly published developer guidance for SharePoint developers. Then we talk about the adorable little Raspberry Pi 2, and getting Windows 10 on a machine with no DVD drive. All that and more in Episode 234.

Audio File

Video File

Podcast 234 - Haven't Made the Cut (Time 0_06_02;11)

YouTube (Subscribe)

Running Time: 42:22

Links:

03:45 - Podcast Awards
06:25 - Evolution of SharePoint
14:15 - First round of Ignite sessions
16:30 - New Guidance from Microsoft for Packaging and Deploying SharePoint Solutions
17:22 - Microsoft Virtual Academy
20:13 - Using CSOM in PowerShell scripts with Office 365
26:30 - Here is everything you know about the Raspberry Pi 2!
31:11 - How to create Windows 10 install media
36:42 - Microsoft Utility to Create Media

Brought to you by Rackspace

ShortURL: http://www.toddklindt.com/Podcast234

  
No presence informationTodd O. Klindt2/2/2015 9:38 AMNetcast0 

In tonight's podcast I account my tale of woe after buying some new hardware. You will likely cry before it's over. Then I bring it up with some good news about Dropbox and and Windows Phone. After that I get into some of my favorite things that were announced last week at Microsoft's Windows 10 event. I finish up with some news on Office 2016.

Audio File

Video File

Netcast 233 - Because the Worm had Disabled It (Time 0_21_07;08)

YouTube (Subscribe)

Running Time: 42:22

Links:

16:20 - Dropbox client for Windows Phone available
19:45 - Download January 2014 Preview ISO
21:30 - Free upgrade from Win 7 or 8 in the first year
27:10 - Windows RT is dead
33:34 - Office 2016 Preview video

Brought to you by Rackspace

ShortURL: http://www.toddklindt.com/Netcast233

  
No presence informationTodd O. Klindt1/21/2015 10:25 PMNetcast0 

Tonight's episode is a special one. I reveal the amount my podcast listeners raised this year for charity. It was a doozy. Then I talk about some SharePoint patch information that I screwed up. Whoopsie. Next I cover some Windows Phone news and talk about some new Windows hardware I recently purchased.

Audio File

Video File

Netcast 232 - I Can't Wait to Play With It (Time 0_00_34;13)

YouTube (Subscribe)

Running Time: 39:19

Links:

15:41 - Stefan Goßner
22:28 - Lumia Denim and Windows 8.1.1
24:21 - Windows event on Wednesday
25:23 - Microsoft offers second shot on exams
26:57 - Buy a MeeGoPad
32:35 - Podcast Awards

Brought to you by Rackspace

ShortURL: http://www.toddklindt.com/Netcast232

  
No presence informationTodd O. Klindt1/20/2015 3:24 PMWindows 8/8.1; Tech Stuff4 

Over the last year I’ve become simply entranced with the Windows 8 slate tablets that have been coming out. They’re small, they run full Windows, and they’re cute as a button. As with most things in Windows, there are lots of options. There are many, larger, full featured Windows 8 tablets out there. I use one, a Surface Pro 2, as my daily driver. With a dock, it functions great as a desktop machine. On a plane it works well as a laptop and a tablet. You can also use it to prop open a window on a warm summer day. However, it costs over $1000, which puts it out of reach for a lot of people. On the other end of the spectrum you can snag a 7” or 8” tablet for $100. That’s what this blog post is about. In this blog post I’ll compare several small, budget tablets to help you decide which one is for you. To help with the comparison I have included a non budget 8” tablet, the Dell Venue 8 Pro. Of the four tablets listed below, I personally own the Toshiba Encore Mine, the Insignia Flex 8, and the Dell Venue 8 Pro. I included the HP because of its popularity and its value. Here’s the list of the tablets and their features:

Edit 2/13/2015: Added Winbook TW700 to the table

 

Toshiba Encore Mini

Insignia Flex 8

HP Stream 7

Dell Venue 8 Pro

Winbook TW700

Unboxing video

View here

View here

None

None

Coming Soon

OS

Windows 8.1 32 bit

Windows 8.1 32 bit

Windows 8.1 32 bit

Windows 8.1 32 bit

Windows 8.1 32 bit

Office 365 sub?

Personal

Personal

Personal

Personal

Personal

CPU

Intel Atom Z3735G (1.33 GHz)

Intel Atom Z3735F (1.33 GHz)

Intel Atom Z3735F (1.33 GHz)

Intel Atom Z3740D (1.8 GHz)

Intel Atom Z3735F (1.33 GHz)

RAM

1 GB

1 GB

1 GB

2 GB

1 GB

Included Storage

16 GB eMMC

16 GB eMMC

32 GB eMMC

32 GB / 64 GB

16 GB eMMC

Uses WIMboot

Yes

Yes

No

No

Yes

MicroSD Slot

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

MicroSD card included?

No

16 GB

No

No

No

Screen Size

7 inch

8 inch

7 inch

8 inch

7 inch

Screen Type

TN

IPS

IPS

IPS

IPS

Screen Resolution

1024 x 600

(resolution set to 1280 x 768)

1280 x 800

1280 x 800

1280 x 800

1280 x 800

Pen Support

Unknown

Unknown

Unknown

Yes

Unknown

Screen sucks?

Yes

No

No

No

No

Miracast Support

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

External Video Connection?

No

Micro-HDMI

No

No

Micro-HDMI

Charger connection

USB 2.0 OTG

USB 2.0 OTG

USB 2.0 OTG

USB 2.0 OTG

USB 2.0 OTG

Works with Plugable 8 Dock?

Yes

Charge only

Yes

Yes

Unknown

Front Camera

2 MP

2 MP

2 MP

1.2 MP

2 MP

Rear Camera

5 MP

2 MP

2 MP

5 MP

2 MP

Wifi Networking

802.11 bgn

Realtek RTL8723BS

Single Band

802.11 bgn

Realtek RTL8723BS

Single Band

802.11 bgn

802.11 agn

Dell 1538

Dual Band

802.11 bgn

Realtek RTL8723BS

Single Band

Bluetooth

4.0

4.0

4.0

4.0

4.0

Dimensions

0.42 x 4.71x 7.83  in

0.39 x 5.24 x 8.27 in

0.39 x 4.25 x 7.34 in

0.35 x 5.12 x 8.50 in

7.44 x 4.76 x 0.43 in

Weight

0.75 lbs (12 oz)

0.9 lbs

12.3 oz

0.87 lbs

12.35 oz

If you find any of this in error, or if there are any features I haven’t listed that you’re curious about, let me know.

tk

ShortURL: http://www.toddklindt.com/TinyTabletTable

  
No presence informationTodd O. Klindt1/15/2015 9:19 AMNetcast0 

I start off tonight's Podcast with the story of my recent trip to New York City. It's more exciting than it sounds, I promise. Then I talk about a new device introduced at CES, a small HDMI stick computer from Intel that runs Windows 8.1. Darling little device. I may have to get one. Let's not fool ourselves, of course I'll get one. Then I talk about a couple of techniques I use to troubleshoot SharePoint issues.

Audio File

Video File

Netcast 231 - Delivered by a Moose (Time 0_07_08;27)

YouTube (Subscribe)

Running Time: 37:41

Links:

04:29 - Birthday Donation Drive
06:09 – Workiva
15:16 - Intel HDMI stick
19:00 - Alibaba Windows HDMI stick
25:35 - SharePoint 2013 Search Query Tool v2.3 released
29:20 - Use Send-MailMessage to troubleshoot SharePoint email messages

Brought to you by Rackspace

ShortURL: http://www.toddklindt.com/Netcast231

  
No presence informationTodd O. Klindt1/8/2015 9:20 PMNetcast0 

Welcome to my first podcast of 2015. It's got SharePoint, it's got Windows 7, Windows 8, AND Windows 10! I talk about some Windows 8 devices that have stolen my heart, a way to do BI in the cloud with on premises data, and how to keep your identity wherever you go.

Audio File

Video File

Netcast 230 - Big Gooey Conference (Time 0_10_20;28)

YouTube (Subscribe)

Running Time: 38:04

Links:

06:06 - Flex 8 Unboxing
15:21 - HP Stream Mini PC
20:50 - Windows 7 will upgrade to Windows 10
28:00 - Microsoft Connects Power BI to On-Premises SQL with Preview Tool
29:34 - Azure AD Sync Service Released, Makes DirSync and FIM Obsolete

Brought to you by Rackspace

ShortURL: http://www.toddklindt.com/Netcast230

  
No presence informationTodd O. Klindt1/5/2015 9:24 AMWindows 8/8.1; Tech Stuff1 

In the last few months I’ve been trying to get my hands on as many Windows tablets as I can. Windows 8.1 has really made the OS great, and it’s a lot of fun on little 7” to 9” devices. In my quest to find the perfect, cheap Windows tablet I recently picked up an Insignia Flex 8 tablet. It was $99 at my local Best Buy. It’s more expensive at the Amazon link, but it gives a better description than Best Buy’s own site does. To get it for $99 you’ll probably have to put on some pants and go to a brick and mortar Best Buy. It’s worth it.

After I got the Flex 8 home, I recorded an unboxing video along with some setup. Here’s the video:

Flex 8 unboxing (Time 0_00_35;20)

As you can see in the video description on YouTube, I do a few things in this video, so you don’t have to watch the entire 28 minutes if you don’t want to. You’ll regret it if you don’t, but the choice is there. Smile

I hope you enjoy the video. If you like these videos and want to see other stuff, let me know.

tk

ShortURL: http://www.toddklindt.com/Flex8Unboxing

  
No presence informationTodd O. Klindt1/4/2015 2:01 PMNetcast0 

Shane and I spend some time talking about the things we can remember from 2014. We talk about our favorite hardware and other favorite stories from the year.

Audio File

Video File

Netcast 229 - 2014 - An Insightful Year in Review (Time 1_19_28;21)

YouTube (Subscribe)

Running Time: 1:22:04

Links:

18:38 - Plugable Dock for Surface Pro
38:10 - iCloud Hack
54:30 - Skype translator

Brought to you by Rackspace

ShortURL: http://www.toddklindt.com/Netcast229

  
No presence informationTodd O. Klindt12/29/2014 10:09 AMNetcast1 

Tonight's Netcast is the last Netcast of 2014. I cover a couple of SharePoint topics, like how to sync identities in SharePoint Foundation when SharePoint Foundation doesn't sync identities. Then I talk about CUs and what they really mean by 'Cumulative.' Then how a recent CU added some functionality for devs, that we admins can leverage, too. Then I jump into some fun stuff about Windows tablets, like how you can get one for less than a meal at McDonald's (if you super size) and 11 things that will make you love it even more, if that's possible.
Audio File

Video File

Netcast 228 - Straightforward, Except When it's Not (Time 0_11_57;18)

YouTube (Subscribe)

Running Time: 45:22

Links:

05:30 - FoundationSync 2.5 Release
09:00 - Amazon Fire TV Stick
11:05 - Sideload apps on your Fire TV Stick
17:30 - SharePoint 2013 Builds page
18:52 - Latest API updates in Client Side Object Model (Dec 2014 CU for SP2013)
22:37 - Using PowerShell and CSOM with SharePoint Online
23:48 - Insignia Flex 8
31:18 - blog post on 6 Windows tips
32:00 - blog post on 5 more Windows tips
37:25 - Qi wireless charging dock
39:10 – SPTechCon
39:11 - SharePoint Evolutions

Brought to you by Rackspace

ShortURL: http://www.toddklindt.com/Netcast228

  
No presence informationTodd O. Klindt12/21/2014 5:03 PMWindows 8/8.10 

In my 6 Tips for Windows Tablet Owners blog post I teased that I had more tips. I know you were all on the edge of your seats. It’s dangerous to publish the first part of a blog post without having already written the second half, but against all odds I pulled it off. Lucky you guys. Here are my next five tips for Windows tablet owners:

1) Change the Onscreen Keyboard

While I use a Surface Pro 2 as my daily driver, I have a bunch of smaller Windows tablets that I use. They’re in the 7” and 8” range and I don’t normally have a keyboard attached to them. I normally use them for consumption, but every once in a while I find the need to dispense some invaluable advice to someone on the Internet that’s wrong about something. The normal onscreen keyboard is okay, but Windows has an even better keyboard available for these smaller screens.

To check out the other keyboards, open up the onscreen keyboard. You can do that by clicking in a box in a Metro app, or triggering it manually anywhere from the Charms bar:

Screenshot (15) -edited

Once the keyboard is up, you can choose one of the alternate keyboards from the popup in the lower right hand corner:

Screenshot (14) - Edited

The split keyboard highlighted above is great for the 7” and 8” laptops. It allows me to hold the tablet landscape and speedily type with my thumbs. it looks like this:

Screenshot (9)

Different keyboards work better for different situations, so make sure to check them all out. Once you find the best one for you, you can help me correct all the wrong people on the Internet.

2) Use a Picture Password

I like my tablets to be secure. I don’t need any ne’er-do-wells combing through my collection of funny cat pictures if I leave my tablet unsecured at the local watering hole. But I also want to be able to get into it without typing my 27 character password that includes upper case, lower case, numbers, symbols, hieroglyphs, and a duck quack. Windows 8 has the solution.

Because, for better or worse, Windows 8 was designed heavily with touch devices in mind. You can log in with your old style password, but there are a couple of new options. You can set up a PIN, or use a picture password. You can get to these from the Charms Bar > Settings > Change PC Settings > Accounts > Sign-in Options:

Screenshot (10) - Edited

To set up a picture password you first have to type in your password, then choose a picture, of course. Next you set up three gestures on that picture. That action can be touching a spot, drawing a line from one point to another, drawing a circle, or resizing. Windows will have you walk through it a second time, just to make sure you both agree on it. Once you get that set up, you can now use that to login or unlock your tablet. You could also set up a PIN, but I don’t like those because they are limited to four characters and seem too insecure. I value my funny cat pictures and their safety.

If you get to that screen and don’t see all the options, you probably see this sad notice instead, “Some settings are managed by your system administrator.” This could be because of a domain policy, or a policy pushed out through your email with Exchange Active Sync. Unfortunately there’s not much you can do about it if it’s disabled at that level. Your best bet is to find incriminating pictures of someone in your IT department.

3) Use the Start Button on the Charms Bar

When using Windows 8 on a primarily touch device, you end up making a lot of use of the Start/Windows button. It gets you back to the much-maligned Start Screen. It also gets you back to whatever application you were running before you went to the Start Screen. Depending on how you are currently holding your device, and where the hardware Windows button is (like the top left edge on my Dell Venue 8 Pro), it can be cumbersome.

Fortunately, as is often the case in Windows, there is more than one way to skin a cat. (The author’s cat, Yngwie, would like, no, demands, the reader to know that the author in no way encourages or condones the skinning of cats, the animal kingdom’s finest specimen) Hidden, right in plain sight is the alternative I use most, the Windows button in the middle of the Charms bar.

Screenshot (11) - Edited

If I’m holding my tablet landscape with both hands, it’s pretty easy to swipe in from the right with my thumb and hit that Start button. The placement of the hardware Start button on the Dell Venue 8 Pro is horrible, which is what initially motivated me to find this alternative. Since then it’s become the standard way I access the Start button regardless of the tablet I’m using.

4) Keep an Eye on Your Storage

One of the ways that manufacturers are able to churn out these inexpensive Windows tablets is to put cheap storage in them. That usually means small amounts of onboard storage, some as little as 16 GB. The storage they do get is usually not very snappy, either. But in most cases, those are okay compromises to make. Smaller tablets normally only have Metro apps installed, which are small. They’re also mainly used for consumption, so there aren’t big virtualized machine files, or hi resolution video files to edit. But, they do need to store some media like MP3s, pictures, and video files from my Netcast, so some storage is necessary. Because of that you need to keep an eye on your storage. Here are a few quick tips around that:

  1. Get a MicroSD card and store everything you can on it. Most, if not all, of these tablets have a MicroSD slot on them.  For all of these tablets I buy cheap 64 GB MicroSD cards. Amazon has them for as cheap as $30. I put all my MP3s there, as well as anything else I can. I do everything I can to keep files off of the C drive. I haven’t tried it, but you should be able to put your Internet Explorer Temporary Internet Files there, Outlook PST and OST files, etc. If you install something like Dropbox, make sure you sync it to the MicroSD card as well.
  2. Shut off System Restore. Don’t get me wrong, I think backing up files is a very important thing. But on devices like little tablets, it’s not as important. While it would be annoying if the drive in one of my tablets died, I wouldn’t lose any data. Most content there is copied from other places, and everything else is synced to OneDrive. Because of that I disable the System Restore on them. Typing “Restore Point” on the Start Screen will take you to the Control Panel applet where you can shut it off.
  3. Use Disk Cleanup to, well, clean up your disk. Disk Cleanup is a tool built in to Windows. It goes through some preset locations and lets you choose to clean them up. It’s easy to use and you can’t beat the price.
    2014-12-21_15-18-16
  4. Use a tool to figure out where all your space is going. There are a bunch of programs that do this, but I like WinDirStat. It gives you a graphic representation of how much space each folder on your computer is using and lets you drill down into them. Once you find the big folders you can figure out how to make them smaller or move them somewhere else.
  5. Use a program to compress your drive. Windows includes file and folder compression, and those help some. But I never keep up with them when I create new folders. Another option I recently saw reminded me of the 1990s, drive compression software. The folks that make ZipMagic have a program you can run that will compress your drive, much like WimBoot does. I haven’t tried it myself yet, but it’s on my list.

5) Keep an Eye on What Autostarts

I use my small tablets also exclusively on battery. Performance is important, but battery life has to be good too. To help with that I don’t allow any applications to autostart on my tablets, whether they think it’s a good idea or not. I can find out which sneaky apps are trying to eat up my battery and use my previous CPU and RAM by going to the Startup tab in Task Manager:

Screenshot (13) - Edited

If your Task Manager doesn’t look like that, try clicking “More details” on the bottom of it. I don’t have many things installed on this tablet, so there aren’t many offenders. On my other tablets I have to make sure things like Dropbox and SnagIt are not allowed to autostart. You’ll see in this screenshot that I have allowed several Intel processes the privilege of autostarting. That’s because that tablet has an Intel chipset for video and I’m not sure what would break if I disabled those. If I had any hair on my chest I’d disable them and see what happens. I do go in here periodically and certainly after I install or patch anything to see what’s been added.

That’s all the tips I have for now. I have a couple more ideas. They may or may not end up as blog posts.

As always, let me know what you think in the comments below.

tk

ShortURL: http://www.toddklindt.com/5MoreTabletTips

  
No presence informationTodd O. Klindt12/18/2014 10:21 AMNetcast0 

In tonight's episode I talk about my new gig as an event model. Then I talk about a problem a listener had with SharePoint and a rogue SMTP server. Then I talk about the new SharePoint patches, and how to tweak SQL Server just right for SharePoint. Never being happy with what I have, I discuss some new things that are coming down the pike. I wrap things up by showing a new device I'll be unpacking for you.

Audio File

Video File

Netcast 227 - This Vacation is Killing Me (Time 0_30_39;20)

YouTube (Subscribe)

Running Time: 50:47

Links:

06:45 - I was on the Ignite mailer
11:57 SharePoint 2010 December 2014 CU
12:04 SharePoint 2013 December 2014 CU
16:50 -Set Up SQL Server 2012 as a SharePoint 2013 Database Server
18:20 - Windows 10 Preview users will be able to upgrade to RTM
23:43 - Gabriel Aul's Twitter Page
24:45 - Office Sway generally available
26:23 - Skype Real Time Translation is available
28:28 Sign up to preview the Skype Real Time translation
29:24 - Gestures Beta for Windows Phone
30:39 - Australia gets Office 365
32:04 - My next toy
45:21 - Birthday Drive

Brought to you by Rackspace

ShortURL: http://www.toddklindt.com/Netcast227

  
No presence informationTodd O. Klindt12/15/2014 12:33 PMNetcast0 

Shane takes over again tonight while I'm on the road for Rackspace. He talks about the Microsoft Band fitness wearable and what he does and doesn't like about it. He also talks about a car that touched him in a bad place, and how life isn't fair, but that's okay, he can tell you the rules.

Audio File

Video File

Netcast 226 - Guess Who's in my Pocket Today (Time 0_06_45;15)

YouTube (Subscribe)

Running Time: 32:54

Links:

02:40 - Grumpy Cat makes 100 million
06:10 - The Microsoft Band
18:45 - Talking to Cortana
25:14 - The Problem Isn't That Life Is Unfair — It's That You Don't Know The Rules

Brought to you by Rackspace

ShortURL: http://www.toddklindt.com/Netcast226

  
No presence informationTodd O. Klindt12/5/2014 7:44 PMWindows 8/8.1; Tech Stuff0 

As I’ve discussed many times on this blog, and on my Netcast I have a medical condition. It’s plagued me since I was young and seems to have gotten worse as I’ve gotten older. It seems I’m addicted to gadgets. If it’s got an on/off switch, I want one. If it has a flashing blue LED, I want it twice as bad. Since last year, Microsoft has starting loosening up the hardware requirements for their Windows Tablets, and that has resulted in the market being flooded with small, affordable, and most importantly fun little units. In the year since I’ve started collecting these little beauties I’ve learned a few things. In talking to other Windows Tablet users I’ve discovered they’re having many of the same issues. I thought I’d scribble down a few of my favorite tips for you all to enjoy. If you read every word of this blog post I guarantee you’ll enjoy your Windows Tablet at least 8.1% more, or your money back.

1) Get a USB OTG Cable

In order to make these tablets so small and thin, they have very few connectors and buttons on them. Many of them use micro USB to charge, which is very convenient as we’re all tripping over micro USB chargers. These USB connectors have a secret though. Like Clark Kent, they have a secret identity. They can be used for more than just charging. These ports are USB On The Go, or USB OTG, so they support being both USB guests and USB hosts. With a special, though industry standard, USB OTG cable you can connect USB devices like mice, keyboards, or humping dogs to your tablet. The cable (sans humping dogs) looks like this:

Windows 8 Recovery Drive (Time 0_03_31;24)

(I’m available for hand modeling gigs. Contact my agent)

That cable has a male micro USB connector on one end, and a female USB jack on the other. You can hook whatever you want to it, even a hub. The first question you’re probably asking yourself, after “Could this cable have more acronyms in its name?”, is “How do I connect the humping dogs and charge this at the same time?” The answer to that is tricky and varies between tablets. For my Dell Venue 8 Pro (DV8 Pro) there are a few options. I’ve blogged about them in this blog post. That same hardware may or may not work for other similar tablets.

Either way, if you have a tablet like this, you should buy several USB OTG cables and hide them all over. Your future self will thank your present self.

2) Make a Recovery Drive

Another common characteristic of these adorable little devices is very small storage options. When I got my DV8 Pro it had two storage options, 32 GB and 64 GB. I got a 64 GB model because I couldn’t imagine running full Windows in 32 GB of space. Now there’s a new round of tablets coming out, like the Toshiba Encore Mini that have a mere 16 GB of storage. Using some tricks like WIMBoot OEMs have gotten the Windows install down pretty small, but there still isn’t much space left. These devices don’t come with physical Windows media anymore. Which is fine, they don’t have DVD drives, so it wouldn’t do much good anyway. Instead they have a dedicated Recovery partition that you can boot into if you need to reinstall Windows. Additionally you can create a bootable USB Recovery drive and delete the Recovery partition. Creating the Recovery drive is a piece of cake. From the Start Screen start typing “Recovery” and the option to “create a recovery drive” should show up in the Search results. You’ll also need a USB OTG cable and a USB drive of 8 GB or so. The process is pretty straight forward, lots of clicking “Next.” To help things along I created a video of how to create a Recovery drive.

Windows 8 Recovery Drive (Time 0_04_04;15)

Even if you don’t plan on deleting the Recovery partition, you should create a separate Recovery drive. It’s pretty cheap insurance against a drive failure. No need to tempt Murphy, after all.

3) Update All the Drivers and Patches

We’re in the infancy of these little Windows tablets and things are changing quickly. Manufacturers are finding ways to pack more and more functionality into them, and ways to refine the functionality that’s already there. Because of that, you want to make sure you routinely check to see if there are driver updates for your device. Shortly after the DV8 Pro came out Dell updated the drivers to include Miracast support and improved the stylus support. It was definitely worth my time to hit the driver page once a month to see what gifts were waiting for me there. Don’t forget to keep up to date on your Windows patches as well. That keeps things running smoothly and helps keep all of the bad guys from stealing your password to Tiger Beat.

4) Get a Charging Dock or Cables

Like I mentioned in the first section of this blog post, these small Windows tablets charge via their USB port, which is also how you attach USB peripherals. Because of that it can be tricky if you want to charge your tablet while you’ve got USB devices attached. Different devices handle it differently, so check the manufacturer’s site, or maybe the forums at Windows Central to see what other folks are doing.

My first tablet was a Dell Venue 8 Pro. There are a few ways to charge it while it’s attached to USB devices. First there was a cheap cable combination that would do it. Then the folks at Plugable started a Kickstarter project for a dock for it. Finally Dell released their own kit to address this. These solutions may or may not work for the tablet you have. Regardless, having one around when you need it is very handy. They’re especially handy if you ever need to use a USB Recovery drive to rebuild your tablet.

In this blog post I review the Plugable Pro 8 dock, including a couple of epic, well produced videos. One stars Brad Pitt, or someone that looks remarkably like him.

5) Get a Miracast Receiver

I’ve mentioned a couple of times how these petite devices are usually lacking when it comes to ports and jacks. In most cases these devices don’t have video output ports. That’s usually not an issue, as an external monitor isn’t what you normally use these devices for. But every once in a while you want to watch Netflix or some funny cat videos on a big TV. That’s when you really miss that HDMI port. Fortunately in most cases there’s a way around this. Many of these small tablets support Miracast, a wireless display protocol. This lets you mirror or extend the display on your tablet wirelessly to nearby TV or monitor. The device could have Miracast built in, but most likely you’ll need to buy a dongle of some sort. These days it seems like everyone and their dog is putting out a Miracast receiver. I know my dog is. Here is a list of some of the main Miracast receivers that are available as of November of 2014:

Netgear PTV3000 $50 (best choice)

Roku 3 $85

Amazon Fire TV Stick $40

Microsoft HD-10 $85

While Miracast isn’t quite rock solid, the Netgear is the least sucky of the whole group. Roku has recently, quietly, added Miracast support to some of their higher end boxes. If you have one of those, check there first before laying out some hard earned money on a different Miracast receiver. Since this is an industry standard your Miracast receiver will also work with other devices, like Android phones and tablets. So you’ll have that going for you.

I recently got an Amazon Fire TV stick and can’t get the Miracast bit to work with any of my Windows machines. Tragic. I’ll update this post if I ever get it figured out.

6) Get a Case

These little cases are remarkably tough, but they’re not indestructible. To help keep them safe and sound, and to provide some extra functionality, I recommend getting a case. I use my slates mainly for reading or watching videos. Those activities benefit from the case having a stand to keep the unit propped up. Having a keyboard is handy sometimes, too, so cases that offer Bluetooth keyboards are a plus.

I’ve tried a couple of cases and had good luck with them. Here are a few I’d recommend:

Bluetooth Keyboard case for Dell Venue 8 Pro $30 (incredible value, includes Bluetooth keyboard)

Bluetooth Keyboard case generic 7” and 8” tablets $26 (works great for Toshiba Encore Mini, includes Bluetooth keyboard)

Slim case for Dell Venue 8 Pro $9

The keyboard cases increase the tablet’s functionality. The slim case is nice for travel and keeping things small. I have one of each and swap them as I need them. A boy likes to have options.

I have more tips, but I think 6 is all I can pack into this one blog post. Stay tuned for me. If you have any tablet tips of your own, enter them below in the comments.

tk

ShortURL: http://www.toddklindt.com/6TabletTips

  
No presence informationTodd O. Klindt12/4/2014 10:19 PMNetcast0 

Tonight's episode is the first time I've remotely brought in a guest, and it was a huge success. Shane popped in and helped me kick things off, then stuck around all night and harassed me. We talked about everything and nothing. We talked about working at Rackspace and how great Host Named Site Collections are. Then we talked about how to delete a file that can't be deleted and how I nearly erased all of my children's childhoods.

Audio File

Video File

Netcast 225 - All My Data Went Poof (Time 0_16_17;14)

YouTube (Subscribe)

Running Time: 59:52

Links:

13:32 - How to get your podcast published in the app stores
14:32 - Snoopy and I on YouTube
18:45 - Work at Rackspace
30:44 - Host Named Site Collections article
32:05 - The MOSS Show
33:28 - Loopback Check Blog Post
49:50 - Birthday Charity drive
53:26 - Meme link

Brought to you by Rackspace

ShortURL: http://www.toddklindt.com/Netcast225

  
No presence informationTodd O. Klindt12/1/2014 3:00 PMNetcast0 

In tonight's Pre-Thanksgiving episode I talk about my recent article about host header site collections, and how they aren't such a bad thing. Then I talk a little about the recent Azure outage and what it means for Cloud providers. Then I dig into a bunch of gadget news. I cover the Amazon Fire Stick I recently got and how much fun it was to set up. Then I move on to a dock I got for my tablets and how it works. Then I talk about how you can get your own tablet to enjoy on the cheap.

Audio File

Video File

Netcast 224 - Streaming From My Slippers (Time 0_16_47;11)

YouTube (Subscribe)

Running Time: 38:02

Links:

05:17 - Making the Case for Host Header Site Collections
10:20 - Azure outage
15:05 - Ignite Call For Topics
21:15 - Amazon Fire Stick
27:30 - Plugable Pro 8 Dock
29:10 - Plugable Pro 8 Dock Unboxing video
30:28 - Toshiba Encore Mini with Plugable Pro 8 Dock
31:29 - $99 Windows tablet, HP Stream 7

Brought to you by Rackspace

ShortURL: http://www.toddklindt.com/Netcast224

  
No presence informationTodd O. Klindt11/26/2014 2:00 PMPowerShell; SharePoint 20130 

Site collections that have the cursed /sites/ managed path in their URL has been the bane of SharePoint administrators for generations. In previous versions of SharePoint there were some ugly workarounds to deal with this, but they involved AAMs, lots of web applications, and ancient incantations. None of those things are good for your soul. SharePoint 2013 provides a much healthier option, the Host Named Site Collection, or HNSC. Unfortunately, getting your head wrapped around the complexity of HNSCs can be daunting, and many SharePoint administrators haven’t embraced them. Some out of confusion and some out of fear. There’s good news though, I recently published at SharePointProMag.com, The Case for Using SharePoint Host-Named Site Collections. In this article I explain what HNSCs are, and how to use them, and give you some PowerShell you can use to create some HNSCs of your own.

So please, read my Host Name Site Collection article and let me know what you think.

tk

ShortURL: http://www.toddklindt.com/HNSCArticle

  
No presence informationTodd O. Klindt11/22/2014 9:41 PMWindows 8/8.10 

Many months ago I bought a Dell Venue 8 Pro tablet and I love it. While the DV8 Pro is a nearly perfect and flawless device, it does have one minor annoyance, it only has one USB port. And that USB port is used for charging, as well as for hooking up peripherals. One doesn’t need a Ph.D. in Math see the problem there, you can’t hook up any peripherals if you need to charge the tablet. Over time, a few solutions have popped up for that problem. I outlined one in this blog post. While that worked, it wasn’t elegant. Plugable to the rescue!

I’ve been using a Plugable UD-3900 with my Surface Pro 2 since I got it and I’ve been very happy with it. I was pretty excited earlier this year when Plugable started a Kickstarter project for a dock specific to the DV8 Pro, the Pro 8 Dock. It charges the DV8 Pro, and has all the common dock accoutrements. It sounded too good to be true, but it wasn’t. I jumped in pretty early at the $50 level and patiently (or not so patiently) waited for it to be released. This week all that waiting paid off and the dock came in. Here’s a picture of it sitting on my desk, begging me to open it so we could play.

Pro8 Unboxing (Time 0_00_48;08)

I did open it, and I did play with it. I recorded it all though so you could enjoy it too. Here’s my unboxing and setup video:

Pro8 Unboxing (Time 0_00_00;00)

YouTube Link

If you’ve been considering a Dell Venue 8 Pro (at Amazon) and a Plugable Pro 8 Dock ($89 on Amazon) that video will give you a good idea what they’re capable of. You can get them both on Amazon with the links in the preceding sentence.

I have a couple different Windows Tablets, so I tried the Pro 8 Dock with another one, my Toshiba Encore Mini. I recently did a video on how to create a Recovery Drive with it and it was asking for more camera time. I decided now was a good time. While Plugable designed the Pro 8 Dock to work with the Dell Venue 8 Pro they have tested it with other tablets. My beloved Encore Mini was not on the approved list. I decided to test it for them. Smile I put my director’s hat back on and recorded a video of what happens when you hook this dock to that tablet. I don’t want to spoil the ending for you, so you’ll have to watch the video to see if I let the magic smoke out or not.

Toshiba and Pro 8 (Time 0_05_43;05)

YouTube Link

There you go. I hope you enjoy the videos. If there are other things like you like see videos of, let me know. I’d like to extend a thanks to the folks at Plugable for making such fun products.

tk

ShortURL: http://www.toddklindt.com/PlugablePro8Review

  
No presence informationTodd O. Klindt11/20/2014 3:49 PMNetcast0 

Tonight's episode was recorded back in my regular time slot. I talk about a few updates. The November CUs for SharePoint came out, as did an important update for OneDrive for Business. I also show you how to look into the future and what's going to happen next in Office 365. Then I talk about how you can make my upcoming birthday even more happy. I finish up by talking about another gadget I've purchased and some tips on how to make SharePoint Search better.

Audio File

Video File

Netcast 223 - Crawl Your People Separately (Time 0_37_59;07)

YouTube (Subscribe)

Running Time: 38:22

Links:

02:19 - http://youtube.com/toddklindtnetcast
10:30 - OneDrive for Business November Update
12:30 - Office 365 Roadmap
17:20 - Lync will be Skype for Business
19:30 - Birthday Charity drive
21:40 - Jonathan's Dumb Podcast
23:30 - Plugable Pro 8 Doc on Amazon
27:30 - Search Best Practices
30:14 - Manage Crawl Load in SharePoint 2010

Brought to you by Rackspace

ShortURL: http://www.toddklindt.com/Netcast223

  
No presence informationTodd O. Klindt11/14/2014 2:55 PMNetcast0 

I'm back this week and well rested and well informed from my week at the MVP Summit. In tonight's episode I talk about the MVP Summit, without violating any NDAs, of course. Then I talk about a couple of cool new developments with the Office client. Then I slow things down and tell the sad tale of my Lumia 920. Hearts broke all over the Internet. :( I finish up by telling you all about a couple of videos I recorded with my Toshiba Encore Mini and how to get a cheap tablet for yourself. Oh, and there's PowerShell, too.

Audio File

Video File

Netcast 222 - OneDrive for Pleasure (Time 0_02_58;26)

YouTube (Subscribe)

Running Time: 43:42

Links:

11:13 - GoPro Camera
14:37 - Office integration with Dropbox
19:25 - Office for Android and iOS is free
33:36 - Toshiba Encore Mini unboxing video
34:09 - Toshiba Encore Mini creating Recovery drive
36:40 - Microsoft store Black Friday sales
37:30 - Downloading PowerShell help

Brought to you by Rackspace

ShortURL: http://www.toddklindt.com/Netcast222

  
No presence informationTodd O. Klindt11/12/2014 9:08 AMNetcast0 

Shane and Jonathan take over again for another mediocre Netcast. I really need to find better backup hosts. They start out the show by talking about some changes in SharePoint training. Then they talk about a great new Twitter account for TV watchers, and the new Microsoft Band fitness device. They finish up talking about Rackspace Cloud OS and how Jonathan has been inspired by me and is starting his own podcast.

Audio File

Video File

Netcast 221 - Live from WKRP in Cincinnati  (Time 0_01_15;02)

YouTube (Subscribe)

Running Time: 43:04

Links:

03:40 - Combined Knowledge buys Mindsharp
11:11 - Making money on free software
17:25 - My favorite Twitter animal to follow
19:55 - Microsoft Band, my Fitbit, and multiple devices.
29:27 - SharePoint AMA

Brought to you by Rackspace

ShortURL: http://www.toddklindt.com/Netcast221

  
No presence informationTodd O. Klindt11/7/2014 4:40 PMWindows 8/8.1; Tech Stuff4 

The last year or so I’ve really been enjoying Windows Tablets. In my last video I unboxed a Toshiba Encore Mini, a $99 Windows Tablet. In this video, the stunning sequel, I’m going to show you how to create a Windows Recovery Drive with it. While the video was created on a Toshiba Encore Mini, the same process will work with any other Windows tablet. Once you have a recovery drive created you can more safely delete the recovery partition and get some of that precious 16 GB back.

Windows 8 Recovery Drive (Time 0_04_04;15)

View on YouTube

Let me know what you think. If there are other things you’d like to see me make videos of, let me know. I’ll see what I can do.

tk

ShortURL: http://www.toddklindt.com/WindowsRecoveryDrive

  
No presence informationTodd O. Klindt10/30/2014 4:29 PMWindows 8/8.10 

I recently picked up a Toshiba Encore Mini. It’s a 7” tablet that runs Windows 8.1. It has 1 GB of RAM, 16 GB of storage, and an Intel Atom Z3735G processor. That doesn’t sound very exciting until you hear the price, $99. $99!!

I picked one of these little beauties up to see what the experience is like. I thought you guys might like a little unboxing and setup video.

Here it is:

Unboxing (Time 0_00_53;15)

View on YouTube

The camera work is a little shoddy. That’ll be better on later videos. If there is interest in more videos like this, let me know.

tk

ShortURL: http://www.toddklindt.com/EncoreUnboxing

  
No presence informationTodd O. Klindt10/29/2014 5:05 PMNetcast0 

Tonight's episode is chock-full of exciting news. Some good, some less than good. We talk about how you can get unlimited OneDrive by signing up for Office 365. Then I talk about a couple of things that Microsoft is taking away. In a few weeks we'll lose both free Xbox Music Streaming and the free Office Web Apps. Then I talk about my love affair with my new Toshiba Encore Mini and how much fun it is. Finally I talk about some cool third party tools, and I talk about one of my favorite things, giving money to charity.
Audio File

Video File

2014-10-29_9-20-46

YouTube (Subscribe)

Running Time: 41:50

Links:

02:08 - Rackspace plug
05:24 – Subscribe to my YouTube Channel
07:47 - OneDrive delivers unlimited cloud storage to Office 365 subscribers
12:29 - Sign up for early access to unlimited OneDrive
13:16 - Free Xbox Music streaming on Windows 8.1 and web will be discontinued in December
16:54 - Toshiba Encore Mini Unboxing
24:11 - Web Apps Server Removal from Download Center
27:09 - 31 Days of SQL Server Management Studio
28:45 - ISE Steroids
30:26 - Birthday Charity drive

SharePoint 2013 Professional Administration

Brought to you by Rackspace

ShortURL: http://www.toddklindt.com/Netcast220

  
No presence informationTodd O. Klindt10/27/2014 9:23 AMNetcast2 

The time I normally do my live Netcast, 8:30 PM CT, is an obnoxious time for my European listeners, 1:30 AM UTC. Some of those Europeans have very politely mentioned they’d like to join in on the chat room harassment, but aren’t willing to stay up that late. I don’t blame them. So every once in a while I do the Live Netcast recording at a different time to give them that opportunity without causing them to lose any sleep. That chance is coming up on November 10th, 2014.

On November 10th, 2014, I’m going to do my Netcast at a time that is less obnoxious for Europeans. Right now I’m thinking about doing it 12 hours earlier at 8:30 AM CST, or 13:30 UTC. However, I’m a reasonable man and might be persuaded to do it at a better time, if there is one. If you’re planning on attending the live showing of the Netcast, and you’d like it at some time other than 13:30 UTC then leave me a comment below telling me what time you’d prefer it. Make sure to include your time zone. You can also tell me on Twitter @toddklindt.

The live recording is broadcast on my YouTube Channel, so there’s nothing to download. If you want to jump into the chat room any old IRC client will do. The server is irc.asrtechnica.com and the channel is #sharepoint. I’m on Windows and use mIRC. I’ve also put a web IRC client on my Netcast homepage, so you can join in with that as well.

tk

ShortURL: http://www.toddklindt.com/EuroNetcast2014

  
No presence informationTodd O. Klindt10/23/2014 10:29 AMNetcast2 

Tonight's episode begins with me apologizing to mules. Yes, mules. Then I talk about why every web app deserves a site collection in its root, and why you want one there whether you want one there or not. Then I talk about some ways to measure the performance of your hardware, and how to scale your SharePoint farm to match your needs. I wrap the show up by talking about the latest gadget I've purchased, and how Windows 8.1 and 10 run happily on 7 year old hardware.
Audio File

Video File

Netcast 219 - The Fairest Equine (Time 0_01_07;10)

YouTube (Subscribe)

Running Time: 41:03

Links:

06:53 - Microsoft Ignite Conference
10:00 - October CU for SharePoint 2013
13:40 - SharePoint 2013 Builds page
16:34 - "Send to Other location" fails when a web application has no root site
18:10 - storage performance & measuring IOPs
22:45 - Performance and capacity test results and recommendations (SharePoint Server 2013)
25:30 - Windows 8 tablet for $99
37:45 - SharePoint & Office 365 Podcast Report

SharePoint 2013 Professional Administration

Brought to you by Rackspace

ShortURL: http://www.toddklindt.com/Netcast219

  
No presence informationTodd O. Klindt10/17/2014 5:12 PMNetcast0 

In this episode we talk a lot about the last episode. It was the first one done with Google Hangouts. We spent some time talking about what worked and what didn't work. Then we talk about all the bad things that can happen if you have your SharePoint Servers automatically install Windows Updates. On the topic of patches we talk about the process SharePoint goes through when you install a patch. I finish up the netcast talking about DLNA, DIAL, and Miracast.
Audio File

Video File

Netcast 218 - Dongles and Vaseline (Time 0_01_19;08)

YouTube (Subscribe)

Running Time: 35:03

Links:

06:45 - Don’t Enable Automatic Updates on SharePoint Servers
21:59 - Plex Media Server
22:58 - Google Chromecast
29:27 - Netgear PTV3000
28:49 - Microsoft HD-10

SharePoint 2013 Professional Administration

Brought to you by Rackspace

ShortURL: http://www.toddklindt.com/Netcast218

  
No presence informationTodd O. Klindt10/9/2014 10:55 PMSharePoint 2010; SharePoint 2013; PowerShell11 

I had an incident a couple of weeks ago that I thought I’d share with all of you. I had a beautiful four server SharePoint 2013 farm. It was humming along, serving up SharePoint pages with the best of them. Then Patch Tuesday hit last month. One of the four servers was set to automatically install Windows Updates, and it did. It installed the crap out of them. Normally that’s not a good thing, but it’s also not a horrible thing. In the past that’s bitten us SharePoint admins because things like .NET patches, or random reboots in the middle of the night. Inconvenient, for sure, but not the end of the world. The September 2014 Patch Tuesday rotation had another trick up its sleeve. It looked like this:

2014-09-29_11-35-55

Picture courtesy of John White (blog | Twitter)

Those sneaky devils snuck a SharePoint patch in the Windows Updates. Installing a patch on just one server of course causes all kinds of havoc. Since I thought all the servers were set to only download it was doubly confusing as to why SharePoint was now all in a snit about needing an upgrade. I got it all taken care of, but that’s food for another blog post.

My recommendation is to NOT enable installing Windows Updates automatically. I recommend having Windows download the patches, then installing them manually. You can change that setting in Control Panel > System and Security > Turn automatic updating on or off. You can also Win + R and run wuapp. It looks like this:

image

You can also set it using PowerShell with this little beauty:

Set-ItemProperty 'HKLM:\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\Windows\CurrentVersion\WindowsUpdate\Auto Update' -Name AUOptions -Value "3"

That might be showing off a little, but using PowerShell is just cool. You can look in this White Paper to see all the different Windows Updates settings and their values.

However, that does not mean you shouldn’t patch your servers. The OS still needs to be patched. You can install them manually, but that sounds like a lot of work. An even better idea would be to install a WSUS Server and push your patches out that way.

Happy patching,
tk

ShortURL: http://www.toddklindt.com/DontAutoUpdate

  
No presence informationTodd O. Klindt10/7/2014 9:39 PMNetcast0 

Tonight's episode is a recap of all the things I've been doing for the last few weeks on the road. I talk about SPTechCon  and being on a panel for the Microsoft Cloud Show. Then I explain what I was doing in Chicago two weeks ago, and tell you all about the Big Microsoft Conference that's going to be held in Chicago in May of 2015. Then I talk about some fun I had in Stockholm last week. I wrap the show up with some technical topics. I talk about the Windows 10 Preview and the Remote Server Administration Tools. Then I talk a little PowerShell and why it's bad to let your SharePoint servers automatically update. 
Audio File

Video File

Netcast 217 - Ball Bearings, Plastics, and PowerShell (Time 0_28_33;07)

YouTube (Subscribe)

Running Time: 36:30

Links:

08:53 - My Interview on Microsoft Cloud Show
11:51 - Microsoft Cloud Show on Twitter
12:00 - Office365 or SharePoint On-Prem panel at SPTechCon
13:00 - Big Microsoft Conference Roundtable
26:37 - Download Windows 10 Client Preview
29:53 - Remote Server Administration Tools for Windows 10 Technical Preview
30:36 - Change PowerShell Get-Help to Display Examples
31:57 - The Altaro PowerShell Hyper-V Cookbook

SharePoint 2013 Professional Administration

Brought to you by Rackspace

ShortURL: http://www.toddklindt.com/Netcast217

  
No presence informationTodd O. Klindt10/6/2014 9:57 AMNetcast0 

Shane takes the helm for the second week in a row in tonight's episode. He brings in some help this time. First he talks about joining a new social site, Ello. Then he discusses taking Microsoft certs in your pajamas, and different docking station options for your Surface Pro. Then Jonathan bores us with what it's like to be a developer. He finishes up with how to make projects succeed, and why you should worry about Marketing, even if you're not in Marketing.

Audio File

Video File

Netcast 216 - The Al Gore of Scrum (Time 0_01_07;18)

YouTube (Subscribe)

Running Time: 47:52

Links:

04:20 – Shane Joined Ello
15:50 - MS Cert exams from home
17:50 - Debate about docking stations for Surface Pro
24:00 – JPM’s SharePoint game
31:07 - JPM’s Twitter ID
42:00 - Offering you more culture and diversity this week

UStream Premium Membership (no commercials during the live stream)
SharePoint 2013 Professional Administration

Brought to you by Rackspace

ShortURL: http://www.toddklindt.com/Netcast216

  
No presence informationTodd O. Klindt9/28/2014 12:37 AM4 

Last July, when Julia White posted her blog post on the Office blog, Microsoft’s unified technology event for enterprises, she broke a few hearts. If you didn’t read it, or have blocked it out, allow me to sum it up. She announced that all the big Microsoft Enterprise tech conferences, TechEd, SharePoint Conference, Project Conference, Exchange Conference, Lync Conference, and Todd’s SharePointorama (okay, I made that last one up) were being combined into one, big, huge conference in Chicago May 4-8, 2015. Those other conferences have sung their swan songs. As someone that has been a speaker at three of those shows (not counting Todd’s SharePointorama) I was a little concerned. Not quite ready to hang up my Microsoft slippers, but I was concerned.

Over the last nine years I’ve been very fortunate to be involved with many Microsoft conferences as a speaker. It’s been a great opportunity and has opened a lot of doors and I’ve met a bunch of great people. I’m kind of a nerd, and with as many conferences as I’ve been involved with (Microsoft and others) I’ve always wondered how the sausage was made. How did the organizer choose the venue? The rooms? How are they able to make sure every little morsel of flavor is cooked out of the chicken they serve for lunch? Does that cost extra? I’ve buddied up with some of the organizers and gotten some of those answers (it doesn’t cost extra) but I was still curious.

A month or so ago a unique opportunity was dropped into my lap. Last year Microsoft started a Roundtable discussion about TechEd. They invited a few folks from different product disciplines, different areas of interest, and different communities to provide Microsoft input on TechEd. They were doing the same thing for the Big Microsoft Conference and they invited me join them. Woo Hoo!

Last Monday and Tuesday I was in Chicago with 17 or so of my closest nerd friends, and another 20 or so Microsoft folks. Our mission was to tour the location of the Big Microsoft Conference, McCormick Place, and let Microsoft know what our opinion on was on a bunch of issues. It was a great time. First, a few pictures. Here is a quick shot I took of the main entrance along with some of my fellow Roundtablers:

WP_20140922_10_10_16_Pro

The size of this place is immense. The exhibit halls alone are 2.6 million square feet, with one over 800k square feet.

WP_20140922_10_28_41_Pro

This is the South exhibit hall. Not only is it large enough for all the IT Vendors, and the pallets and pallets of free t-shirts and 2 GB USB drives they’ll be giving away, if you look closely you’ll see it has an island in the middle. This island has some meeting space, some possible food vending spots, and most importantly, bathrooms! My biggest problem with large exhibit halls is that the potties are only on the outside walls, and sometimes those walls are a very long ways away. My bladder does not approve of that.

Here’s one of the smaller exhibit halls with a plumbers convention going on. I’m not sure why, but that cracks me up. Smile

WP_20140922_10_51_11_Pro

The views from the Lakeside Center were beautiful. The organizers haven’t decided yet where stuff will go, but I hope I get some sessions over there.

WP_20140922_10_59_00_Pro

I talked to the McCormick IT guys and they assured me we’d have more than enough bandwidth to get out to the cloud for our demos and still be able to satisfy our constant cravings for cat videos. It’s a tall order, but they are confident they are up to it.

For the rest of the first day, and the second day we talked about The Big Conference itself. How the sessions will be decided on, keynotes, entertainment, etc. I let them know I was available for the keynote. We’ll see what happens. I was initially concerned about how Microsoft was going to bring all of these conferences together without killing the things that made them great. The Big Conference will probably have 20,000 people as opposed to the 10k or so at TechEd or the SharePoint Conference. It’s tough to manage that many people, especially such tight groups. And where will they all stay? How will they all get there and back? Will there be enough ice cream at break time?? After hearing what the Microsoft organizers had to say, I think they’ve got a good handle on it.

It was very clear that they know the networking and community aspects of these tech conferences are very, very important. We tech nerds aren’t always the most socially outgoing and they don’t want to lose the ability for people to find each other, or for people that already know each other to stay together. They also know that with the increase in the number of sessions and attendees they’re going to have to make sure things are discoverable. I suggested using <blink> tags for all of my sessions. I’m not sure anyone wrote that idea down.

It feels like the organizers of the Big Microsoft Conference have thought this through really well. They spent a lot of time letting us talk and really listening to what we had to say. TechEd and the SharePoint Conference were very important to me, and I’ll miss them both dearly. But I feel like their legacies are in good hands. I’m looking forward to the Big Microsoft Conference in May. I’ll post more about the conference here as more details emerge.

SavetheDate_Twitter

tk

ShortURL: http://www.toddklindt.com/MSBigConf

  
No presence informationTodd O. Klindt9/26/2014 4:13 PMNetcast0 

Another week with Shane at the helm of the Netcast. It's a wonder you guys still tune in. Shane talks about SPTechCon and how great it was presenting with me. I really do make him look good. He talks about getting Office to students and some commercials he likes. Then he talks about an interesting article about Olive Garden and designing products.
Audio File

Video File

image

YouTube (Subscribe)

Running Time: 55:04

Links:

01:00 - http://www.rackspace.com/microsoft
02:55 - Microsoft made it easier for students to get Office for free if their school has subscribed to O365
10:35 - Video of PowerShell for fun and profit
10:43 - Video of Upgrading from SharePoint 2010 to 2013
15:50 - Business Insider article on Olive Garden
21:58 - Customers Don’t Know What They Want—Until They See It

UStream Premium Membership (no commercials during the live stream)
SharePoint 2013 Professional Administration

Brought to you by Rackspace

ShortURL: http://www.toddklindt.com/Netcast215

  
No presence informationTodd O. Klindt9/23/2014 10:25 AMNetcast0 

This episode was recorded at SPTechCon and the sound isn't very good. :( Sorry about that. Shane and I talk about SQL and Windows patching. Then we move on to Windows Phone and Minecraft. The whole time Shane treats me with disrespect. No one likes Shane.

Audio File

Video File

image

YouTube (Subscribe)

Running Time: 55:04

Links:

01:42 – Production Notes
11:53 - Install-SPService saves the day
23:09 - SQL 2014 support added in April 2014 CU
23:50 - September 2014 Cus released
32:50 – Windows Phone is cool
45:07 - Microsoft buys Minecraft

UStream Premium Membership (no commercials during the live stream)
SharePoint 2013 Professional Administration

Brought to you by Rackspace

ShortURL: http://www.toddklindt.com/Netcast214

  
No presence informationTodd O. Klindt9/12/2014 11:07 AMNetcast0 

Tonight's Netcast has all kinds of fun stuff, and oddly no SharePoint. I talk the new Cyan patch for Windows Phone and all the fun I had getting it installed. Then I talk about OneDrive and Dropbox and why I keep playing for Dropbox. Then I giddily talk about the PowerShell v3 Preview and I gush over a couple of my favorite new features. I wrap things up talking about some cool new Windows 8.1 hardware that will be coming out soon.

Audio File

Video File

image

YouTube (Subscribe)

Running Time: 50:13

Links:

08:00 - Cyan is out for Lumia 920 on AT&T
11:31 - Download the Nokia Recovery Tool
12:00 - Nokia Cyan rollout list
16:40 - OneDrive is Great! Then Why Do I Pay for Dropbox?
22:28 - And Microsoft responds!
23:01 - The OneDrive Blog
25:10 - PowerShell 5.0 September 2014 preview
30:45 - ZOTAC shrinks the PC with ZBOX PI320 pico
34:45 - $120 Windows Tablet from Toshiba
35:00 -  HDHomeRun

UStream Premium Membership (no commercials during the live stream)
SharePoint 2013 Professional Administration

Brought to you by Rackspace

ShortURL: http://www.toddklindt.com/Netcast213

  
No presence informationTodd O. Klindt9/10/2014 10:59 AMSharepoint; SharePoint 20130 

It’s hard to believe, but we’re only a few days away from SPTechCon in Boston. As I’m making my lists and checking them twice I thought I’d put all of my events in one convenient location. That way folks that are attending SPTechCon will more easily be able to avoid me. Smile

Monday, September 15th

Live Netcast Recording – 9:00 PM-ish Location: It’s currently a secret

Shane and I will be doing a live recording and stream of my SharePoint netcast. If you’ve ever wanted to heckle in person, here’s your big chance. You’ll have to bring your own tomatoes, we will not be providing them.

Tuesday, September 16th

Upgrading from SharePoint 2010 to 2013 – 9:00am – 12:15pm

Everyone is doing it, so what are you waiting for? The best answer would be that you are waiting to learn all of the fun that goes into an upgrade. Well, if that is the case, then wait no longer. Come to this class to learn about all things upgrade. Topics to be covered are the options you have to upgrade, planning for the process, and looking at the tools Microsoft includes with SharePoint to help along the way.

The good news is this time around there is only one upgrade option to show you for getting the database upgraded, but when it comes to upgrading the UI, it is a brave new world. Visual upgrade is gone and now you have 2010 versus 2013 site collections running in the same 2013 farm. And the transition from a 2010 site collection is now self-service for the site collection administrator--crazy! Come hang out with us as we explore this together.

Office 365 vs. On-Premise Panel – 5:30pm – 6:30pm

Andrew Connell is hosting a panel with some of the brightest minds in the SharePoint world to discuss what the future of SharePoint in the cloud and on-premises is. They decided it would be fun to invite me to have someone to make fun of. Join us and let us know what you think, of both SharePoint and them making fun of me.

Wednesday, September 17th

Introduction to Windows PowerShell for SharePoint Administrators – 11:00am – 12:15pm

Do you plan on working on Microsoft products for the next five years? Do you only know enough about PowerShell to spell it correctly? If you answered yes, then this is the class for you. PowerShell is the present and future tool that is the cornerstone of administering Microsoft products like SharePoint, and if you don't know it, then you are working too hard. Come to this class to learn the key fundamentals of PowerShell, and how to use those skills to solve every problem you have ever had. That's right! If you have a flat tire, PowerShell can even fix that.

SharePoint 2013 Administrator Skills – 3:45pm – 5:00pm

In this class, we will go over the different admin topics that are new for 2013. Some experience with 2010 is assumed, so the class can focus on topics new to 2013. Some of the high points will be an overview of how Office Web Apps have changed your farm topology; the move to loving Claims authentication; and why all the talk about host name site collections. For certain, PowerShell will sneak in not because it is new, but because it is that important.

Lightning Talks – 5:15pm – 6:30pm

Watch vendors try to hawk their wares without it looking like they’re trying to hawk their wares. Also see Shane and I try to be funny, even though we’re not.

I’ll also just be wandering the halls chatting with folks. If you see me, be sure to come up and introduce yourself and say “Hi!” and maybe take a minute or two to explain why you like me better than Shane. Rackspace will also have a booth, so I’ll be hanging out there, too.

See you next week.

tk

ShortURL: http://www.toddklindt/SPTechConBoston2014

  
No presence informationTodd O. Klindt9/7/2014 9:44 PMPowerShell0 

It’s been a busy summer and I’m just getting around to installing the PowerShell v5 Preview. And it’s a good one. It’s officially called the “Windows Management Framework 5.0 Preview September 2014” but it’s all PowerShell. It will install on Windows Server 2012 R2 and Windows 8.1, both 32 and 64 bit varieties. This is a Preview, a beta, so don’t install it on a Production machine. Don’t test in Production. But if you have a test machine, go ahead and install this and take it for a spin. You’ll be glad you did.

There are a ton of great new features in PowerShell v5. Several blog posts worth. Too many for me to list here, though they are all listed in the 59 page Word doc that comes with the download. I will, however, tease you with two of my favorites.

Transcript works in the Integrated Scripting Environment (ISE) Huzzah!

This has been my main disappointment in PowerShell for a couple of versions. I teach PowerShell classes and write blog posts on PowerShell, and am generally a PowerShell doodler. The Transcript is invaluable in all of those situations. And while the first generation of the ISE was nothing to write home about, it’s gotten pretty impressive lately. I’ve wanted to take advantage of it, but it didn’t work with the Transcript. <sad panda> In the past I’ve had to choose between my old, faithful functionality, the Transcript, and the new hotness, the ISE. Conflicts aplenty. Well, no more.

The ISE now supports the Transcript. No more choosing. I get my cake and I get to eat it!

image

Now I have no more excuses, the ISE will be my PowerShell interface of choice.

PowerShell natively zips and unzips files

This is another one of those, “What do you mean PowerShell doesn’t…” situations I keep having with PowerShell. It seemed amazing to me that there wasn’t easy native support for zipping and unzipping files in PowerShell. I’ve spent hours looking for it. Now in v5 it’s finally here. Two new cmdlets, Compress-Archive and Expand-Archive handle the zipping and unzipping respectively. As of the writing of this article, there aren’t any –examples in the help documentation, but I expect after a few Update-Help executions some will show up. Here’s an example to get you started:

Compress-Archive power*.txt -DestinationPath .\gold.zip -CompressionLevel Optimal

Running that in the folder that has all your PowerShell Transcript files into a single file, gold.zip. To keep it updated, run the same command with the optional –Update parameter.

There you go, two excellent reasons to install the PowerShell v5 Preview on your favorite test box.

tk

ShortURL: http://www.toddklindt.com/PowerShellv5Preview

  
No presence informationTodd O. Klindt8/30/2014 10:53 PMTech Stuff0 

This was written in August of 2014. As technology marches forward, the prices and features of the products mentioned have probably gotten cheaper, bigger, faster, stronger, and better smelling. If you’re from the future and reading this, keep that in mind.

Last week Dropbox announced they were upgrading their $100 a year ($9 a month) Pro plan from 100 GB of storage to a massive 1 TB. (insert picture of Dr. Evil with his pinky to his mouth here). Because of that announcement Dropbox has been all over the tech news. In Windows Weekly #377 my friend Paul Thurrott comments that $99 a year is as much as a license for Office 365 Home, which gives you email, Office Web Apps, and 1 TB of OneDrive For Business (ODFB) for 5 people (5 TB total) . He wondered why anyone would pay the same amount for just storage, and 1/5 of the storage at that. I hope to provide a satisfactory answer to that question with this blog post.

I’ve been paying for Dropbox Pro for a couple of years and it’s worth every penny to me. This is the case even though I get a free Office 365 subscription because I’m an MVP. While I do use a bunch of the functionality of OneDrive and OneDrive for Business, there are a few things that Dropbox does so much better that it’s worth giving up a couple of of venti hot chocolates a month at Starbuck’s to pay for Dropbox Pro. Here is my list of why I pay for Dropbox Pro even though I get OneDrive and Office 365 for free.

File size limitation of 2 GB in OneDrive (250 MB in ODFB) , Infinity +1 in Dropbox

I store a lot of different types of files in Dropbox. Like most folks I store pictures up there and a few documents. But I also store all the videos from my Netcast there. I store a bunch of commonly used software installations up there as well. I have the database backups from my blog syncing to a machine at home through Dropbox. I’ve even been known to store a virtual machine or two in Dropbox. Using the desktop sync client, any file I copy into a Dropbox folder will show up on all the other machines syncing that same folder. When I first tried to move over to OneDrive that didn’t work. OneDrive has a hard file size limit of 2 GB. ODFB has a similar limit of 2 GB. Dropbox’s limit is infinity. If you have space in your Dropbox quota, the file will sync. 2 GB might be more than enough for most people, but I regularly deal with larger files so it’s a big deal for me.

Shared folders in OneDrive or ODFB don’t sync to the file system. Dropbox is happy to

Despite the fact that I’m an only child, I share pretty well, regardless of what my wife might say. With OneDrive or ODFB if I share a folder with someone it does not sync to their local hard drives, even if they have the desktop sync clients installed. Even if they ask nicely. That means if I share a folder with someone they have to go to OneDrive (or ODFB) with a browser, or the Metro OneDrive app to download the files I’ve shared with them. For some situations, this might not be a big deal, but it’s come up a few times for me. For instance, I have a shared Dropbox folder with my parents where I copy pictures of my cats and any of my artwork that’s refrigerator worthy. My parents have that same folder set up as a location for a slideshow screensaver. So as I proudly drop pictures into that folder on my computer, they magically sync to my mom’s hard drive and show up in her screensaver. She doesn’t have to remember to check for them, they’re just there.

Files don’t just have a URL in OneDrive or ODFB, you have to download them from a web page

If I share an individual file with someone in OneDrive, the link I send them takes them to a web page that hosts the file. It doesn’t take them to the actual file itself. Again, it’s not a huge deal, but it’s more work that they have to go through than if I share the same file the same way with Dropbox. If I send someone a link to a Word doc shared from Dropbox, the URL goes to that exact file. They could download it with PowerShell if they wanted to. With OneDrive and ODFB it’s a whole big affair.

OneDrive For Business alters Office files, Dropbox keeps its dirty mitts off of them

It recently came out that files stored in ODFB are actually altered when they’re uploaded. On the backend, ODFB is a SharePoint document library. When an Office document is uploaded to SharePoint it puts a unique tag in it so it can keep it straight from other copies of that file, or other versions of it. I understand why they do it, but it doesn’t seem necessary for non work files. Dropbox doesn’t change the files. I like that better.

While a few of these issues are pretty small potatoes, a couple of them (file size and local syncing) are show stoppers for me. As one as OneDrive or ODFB doesn’t support them, I’ll continue to happily pay for Dropbox.

tk

ShortURL: http://www.toddklindt.com/whydropbox

  
No presence informationTodd O. Klindt8/29/2014 11:14 AMNetcast0 

I start out this week's Netcast talking about the ALS Ice Bucket challenge and how I partook in it and you can help me out with my next charity drive. Then I dig into fun tech stuff. I talk about why you should have as few app pools as possible in SharePoint. Then I sing the praises of the new and improved ULS Viewer. Then I help demystify patching and when you can expect the Cyan update on your Nokia Lumia phone.
Audio File

Video File

Netcast 212 - Mules Powered SharePoint (Time 0_03_47;16)

YouTube (Subscribe)

Running Time: 47:09

Links:

05:00 - ALS Ice Bucket challenge video
10:01 - Birthday drive
11:52 - The Expense of Application Pools
21:07 - http://spbestwarmup.codeplex.com
22:10 - ULS Viewer is Back From the Dead!ULS Viewer is Back From the Dead!
29:27 - http://spinsiders.com/brianlala/2014/08/25/pre-populating-sharepoint-farm-details-for-ulsviewer/
30:11 - Stefan Gossner's blog post on the August 2014 CUs
39:03 - Nokia Cyan rollout list
42:42 – Shameless self Promotion

UStream Premium Membership (no commercials during the live stream)
SharePoint 2013 Professional Administration

Brought to you by Rackspace

ShortURL: http://www.toddklindt.com/Netcast212

  
No presence informationTodd O. Klindt8/22/2014 10:34 PMSharePoint 2010; SharePoint 20139 

It was a sad day when the original MSDN ULS Viewer was discontinued. There was much weeping at the Klindt household when the news broke. Fortunately I found a backup copy. I put it on a USB stick and buried it in my backyard for safe keeping, next to the coffee can with my Honus Wagner baseball card in it. I also put a copy in The Cloud, whatever that is. There was still an open spot in my heart though. Smile

Then today I was putzing around the Internet, looking for some cat videos and discount pharmaceuticals when I saw one of the happiest headlines I’ve ever seen on the Internet, “ULS Viewing Like a Boss (ULS Viewer is now available)

First, I was in denial. I wouldn’t let myself believe it. I was worried it was an old blog post bubbling up some how. Then I was worried that maybe it was just a mean joke from Bill. He’s like that, you know. But I clicked it, then I clicked the Download Link, then I downloaded it, and it actually worked! Hallelujah!

So run, don’t walk, to your nearest web browser and go Bill Baer’s blog post and download the new and improved ULS Viewer. It has some bug fixes and it  has some new features, like some fancy command line parameters, and easier support for monitoring multiple servers. All the while maintaining the same charm and panache as the original version.

This time around the ULS Viewer looks a little more legit, so hopefully we don’t have to worry about it disappearing in the middle of the night like a deadbeat relative that owes you money, like it did last time. If you’re smart though, you’ll bury it in your backyard like I did.

tk

ShortURL: http://www.toddklindt.com/ulsviewer

  
No presence informationTodd O. Klindt8/22/2014 9:17 PMNetcast0 

Another Netcast, another video failure. *sigh* When my video recording software wasn't crashing I talked about why I was gone last week. I also talk about some cool Windows Phone stuff coming down the pike, and how patching both SharePoint and Windows has gotten really complicated in the last month. Then I talk about hacking Shane's car. Please don't tell him.
Audio File

Video File

image

YouTube (Subscribe)

Running Time: 49:31

Links:

  1. 08:00 - Guitar camp
  2. 16:25 - Offline maps with Here Maps
  3. 18:21 - Windows Phone update
  4. 24:51 - August 2014 CUs are out for SharePoint
  5. 31:52 - August Windows 8.1 yanked
  6. 33:00 - Community-supplied Fix for August Blue Screens
  7. 35:31 - Windows Threshold technical preview expected late September
  8. 36:50 - OBD Auto Doctor is a must-have Windows Phone app for any DIY auto enthusiast
  9. 38:15 - ODB Reader
  10. 40:25 – Shameless Self-Promotion

UStream Premium Membership (no commercials during the live stream)
SharePoint 2013 Professional Administration

Brought to you by Rackspace

ShortURL: http://www.toddklindt.com/Netcast211

  
No presence informationTodd O. Klindt8/18/2014 5:32 PMNetcast0 

Once again, Shane steals my show away from me and the wheels fall right off. He talks about his tablet and his phone and boring stuff like patches and encryption. Then he chats about how cool Internet Explorer is and how to hack his car. He also breaks the news to us that to use Internet services it takes Internet bandwidth.

Audio File

Video File

hqdefault

YouTube (Subscribe)

Running Time: 28:09

Links:

04:05 - Shane's Surface Pro 3 is fancy and cool
09:31 - I want Nokia Cyan to come out for my 1020
10:43 - Microsoft is the leader in Gartners Magic Quadrant for Unified communications
11:54 - Running your public website on SharePoint? Time to consider encryption
13:51 - Update to Windows 8.1 tomorrow as part of patch Tuesday
15:50 - Only a year half more of a million versions of IE
17:20 - Couple this with last week's change in behavior around out-of-date Active X controllers being blocked
20:35 - Plan for Internet bandwidth usage for Office 365
22:32 - OBD Auto Doctor is a must-have Windows Phone app for any DIY auto enthusiast
24:46 – Shameless Todd-Promotion
26:38 - SharePoint Power Hour

UStream Premium Membership (no commercials during the live stream)
SharePoint 2013 Professional Administration

Brought to you by Rackspace

ShortURL: http://www.toddklindt.com/Netcast210

  
No presence informationTodd O. Klindt8/11/2014 12:16 PMNetcast0 

Tonight's Netcast is all over the board, in a good way. I start off giving my opinions on luck vs. hard work with a funny video I saw on the Internet. Then I follow up with some more technical, but less entertaining talk about URL rewriting and SharePoint Search performance. I follow it up by showing off what's new in the Windows Phone 8.1 Update 1. Overall, not the worst work I've done.

Audio File

Video File

image

YouTube (Subscribe)

Running Time: 40:58

Links:

03:47 - Luck vs. Hard work video
07:58 - 10 URL Rewriting Tips and Tricks (URL at 11:41)
10:44 - Using 301 Redirect URL Rewrite module to Redirect SharePoint urls
27:32 - Removing unwanted user related search results for SharePoint 2013 websites
30:38 - Update for Windows Phone 8.1 is rolling out

UStream Premium Membership (no commercials during the live stream)
SharePoint 2013 Professional Administration

Brought to you by Rackspace

ShortURL: http://www.toddklindt.com/Netcast209

  
No presence informationTodd O. Klindt8/3/2014 10:26 PMNetcast2 

After my very successful tour of the Southern Hemisphere I get back in my squeaky chair and record another Netcast. I start out by regaling everyone with the tales of my trip including some Netcast viewers that I got to meet. Then I talk about how CUs come out once a month and how that's a good thing. Next I talk about when a SQL Service Pack isn't really a Service Pack. Then I breeze through some other topics like a Windows Phone update, a FitBit app for Windows Phone, how to share tabs between devices, and how to use PowerShell with SharePoint even if you're not on the SharePoint server.

Audio File

Video File

image

YouTube (Subscribe)

Running Time: 39:08

Links:

20:27 - Double Your Cumulative Update Fun, SharePoint CUs Are Now Monthly!
24:14 - Problems installing SQL Server 2012 R2 SP2
30:45 - Project Siena
33:58 - Windows phone Live Lock screen app
35:52 - Official Fitbit app for Windows Phone 8

UStream Premium Membership (no commercials during the live stream)
SharePoint 2013 Professional Administration

Brought to you by Rackspace

ShortURL: http://www.toddklindt.com/Netcast208

  
No presence informationTodd O. Klindt7/31/2014 5:03 PMNetcast0 

Shane takes over the Netcast again in my absence. He rambles on and on about how great I am and how much he respects and adores me. Then he talks about all the fun he had at WPC and how it's just not as much fun without me there. And speaking of conferences Shane talks about how Microsoft is consolidating all their IT Pro conferences into one big conference next year. Finally he talks about some new Cloud offerings from Microsoft and just what "Cloud" means. While it's not as good as a Netcast from me, it's better than no Netcast at all.

Audio File

Video File

image

YouTube (Subscribe)

Running Time: 20:36

Links:

07:04 - Microsoft Unified Commercial Conference

08:40 - Thanks to John Engates

10:16 - Post from Bill Baer

10:20 - Azure Preview Portal - Set up SharePoint 2013 HA Farm:

UStream Premium Membership (no commercials during the live stream)
SharePoint 2013 Professional Administration

Brought to you by Rackspace

ShortURL: http://www.toddklindt.com/Netcast207

  
No presence informationTodd O. Klindt7/11/2014 10:16 AMPowerShell0 

While SharePoint is my main love, recently I’ve been dabbling in virtualization and making clouds. You can’t work at a big hosting company like Rackspace without getting a little cloud-curious and I was no exception. For the last year or so in my spare time I’ve been playing with setting up clouds, managing clouds, automating clouds, etc. My cloud weapon of choice has been the combination of Hyper-V, System Center, and the Windows Azure Pack (WAP). Having worked with Microsoft products for the last 20 years, it was an easy fit. Being the incredibly efficient (some call it “lazy,” I just don’t see that) guy that I am, the PowerShell integration has been one of my favorite parts. Especially once you see what it takes to get all of System Center and WAP installed and configured. It makes installing a SharePoint farm look like a carriage ride through a park.

Since I’m a little late to the game, smarter people than me have already seen this gap and filled it. Specifically Rob Willis at Microsoft wrote a tool called the PowerShell Deployment Toolkit (PDT) to automate all of this. It’s flat out amazing. For the last year or so I’ve been playing with the PDT and I’m constantly impressed by it.

Recently, one of my coworkers, Andre Stephens, and I wrote a short write-up about how we’re using the PDT to install large System Center deployments at Rackspace. You can read Provisioning a Microsoft Private Cloud with PDT at the Rackspace Developer blog.

You’ll probably be seeing a lot more posts from me about this kind of stuff. It’s been a lot of fun and I just can’t help myself sharing when I play with cool technology.

tk

ShortURL: http://www.toddklindt.com/UsePDT

  
No presence informationTodd O. Klindt7/10/2014 8:20 AMSharePoint 2010; SharePoint 20134 

If you’re like me, you look forward to all the even numbered months. Not just because of Valentine’s Day and my dad’s birthday, but because that’s when our beloved SharePoint gets its new Cumulative Updates. The odd numbered months just don’t feel like as much fun in comparison. I felt bad for them.

Until today… (well, yesterday)

I was surprised two days ago when SharePoint 2013 got a July CU. July? That’s an odd month, this makes no sense! This changes everything. Is water still wet? Is the sky still blue? I can’t keep up!

Yesterday Microsoft announced that SharePoint on-premises, both 2010 and 2013, will start getting monthly CUs. That’s going to be a lot to keep track of, but I think I’m up to it. I will still maintain my SharePoint 2010 Builds page and my SharePoint 2013 Builds page. My guidance on CUs hasn’t changed. You shouldn’t install a CU unless it contains a fix that you need. And if you talk yourself into installing a CU, install it in a test environment first to see if it breaks anything. I maintain a wiki with a page for every patch. As soon as I know about a problem with a patch I’ll record it there. If you do find a problem with a patch, let me know and I’ll add it.

At first blush, I think this is a good thing. Like SharePoint Online, Microsoft seems committed to updating SharePoint on-prem at a rapid pace. The good news with on-prem SharePoint is that we get to choose whether the patches get installed or not. Seems like the best of both worlds to me.

tk

ShortURL: http://www.toddklindt.com/CUsRMonthly

  
No presence informationTodd O. Klindt7/9/2014 9:13 PMNetcast2 

In tonight's Netcast we cover more Service Pack 1 shenanigans and I talk about how you can keep up to date with the changes I make to my patch pages. We also talk about using PowerShell with SharePoint Online, and how you can get your digital library chock full of meaty Microsoft books without breaking any state or federal laws.

Audio File

Video File

Netcast 206 - Tomfoolery (Time 0_33_28;02)

YouTube (Subscribe)

Running Time: 38:01

Links:

05:23 - MVP Award
08:40 - TechSmith
09:54 - VMWare
14:41 - How to tell which Service Pack 1 you have installed on SharePoint 2013
23:39 - Find out when my web pages change
25:22 - http://www.changedetection.com
27:37 - http://media.toddklindt.com/Netcast
28:42 - SharePoint Online PowerShell
33:00 - Largest collection of FREE Microsoft eBooks ever

UStream Premium Membership (no commercials during the live stream)
SharePoint 2013 Professional Administration

Brought to you by Rackspace

ShortURL: http://www.toddklindt.com/Netcast206

  
No presence informationTodd O. Klindt7/3/2014 9:42 AMNetcast0 

It's good to be back in the studio. This week's Netcast starts fast and keeps up that pace. I talk about the ShareThePoint Conference I'll be attending in Australia and New Zealand, and how some lucky listener can win a free pass. Then I cover a Distributed Cache problem I read about, and also how the April 2014 CU for SharePoint 2013 fixes an annoying bug where SharePoint ignores custom error pages. Then I talk about SQL a little bit. I link to a script you can use to generate some tables, and I talk about why you would install SQL Management Studio on your SharePoint server. I finish up with an Office365 authentication post, why Firefox hates SharePoint, and why you shouldn't use a dollar sign in an account name. My last story is about a Kickstarter project for a dock for the Dell Venue 8 Pro.

Audio File

Video File

image

YouTube (Subscribe)

Running Time: 50:29

Links:

08:04 - Win a free pass to ShareThePoint Conference
16:23 - Exception 'Microsoft.ApplicationServer.Caching.DataCacheException: ErrorCode<ERRCA0017>:
19:46 - SharePoint 2013 is not using my Custom Error Page
21:54 - SharePoint 2013 Build Numbers
23:32 - https://twitter.com/sp2013Patches
24:00 - Put SQL Management Studio on SharePoint box (from Netcast 77)
28:20 - Simple SQL Server script to create a database and generate activity for a demo
29:55 - Firefox 30 breaks SharePoint on non-Windows machines
34:00 - Choosing a sign-in model for Office 365
35:55 - Do not use service account names that contain the symbol $
36:35 - Service Account Suggestions for SharePoint 2013
37:55 - Plugable launches Dell Venue 8 Pro charger Kickstarter project

UStream Premium Membership (no commercials during the live stream)
SharePoint 2013 Professional Administration

Brought to you by Rackspace

ShortURL: http://www.toddklindt.com/Netcast205

  
No presence informationTodd O. Klindt7/1/2014 3:59 PMNetcast0 

I take one little vacation and Shane and Lori hijack my show! In this episode, Shane takes the mic, all by his lonesome. I haven't been able to listen to the whole thing, but I'm sure it's okay. He talks about SharePoint, his dog, and how much he looks up to me. It's a little embarrassing, but I'm okay with it.

Audio File

Video File

image
YouTubeYouTube (Subscribe)

Running Time: 27:31

Links:

03:00 - Todd's Mic - Blue Yeti Pro
24:00 - THE Ceiling fan!

UStream Premium Membership (no commercials during the live stream)
SharePoint 2013 Professional Administration

Brought to you by Rackspace

ShortURL: http://www.toddklindt.com/Netcast204

  
No presence informationTodd O. Klindt6/28/2014 9:42 AMWindows 8/8.14 

Since the spunky Dell Venue 8 Pro came out last year I’ve had a huge crush on it. It’s cute, it’s powerful, and it won’t break the bank. While the DV8 Pro is super fun, it has at least one annoying limitation. Because it uses a single USB OTG connection it can’t be charged while a USB device is attached. There are a couple of creative workarounds, including my own blog post, “How to use USB devices with your Dell Venue 8 Pro and charge it at the same time.” While my solution is both brilliant and elegant, it has a touch of kludge to it.

The good news is that the folks at Plugable have come to our rescue. I’ve been using a Plugable UD-3900 with my Surface Pro 2 for months, and I like it. The minds at Plugable have stayed up night and day and they’ve designed a Plugable dock for the DV8 Pro that will charge the device while also allowing you to use USB devices. Hallelujah! To gauge interest they’ve created a Kickstarter project.

If you have a Dell Venue 8 Pro or Lenovo Miix, and you’d like an elegant solution to this frustrating problem, consider helping Plugable out and pledging the project. I already have, you should too. Smile

tk

http://www.toddklindt.com/DV8ProDock

Edit 11/18/2014: This can now be purchased directly from Amazon

  
No presence informationTodd O. Klindt6/26/2014 4:40 PMNetcast0 

Tonight's netcast has a special treat, Todd and Shane in a hotel room. After they settle down they talk about tips for beginning podcasters, The June 2014 CU for SharePoint 2013, and patching the Distributed Cache. Then Shane fawns over his Lumia 1020 phone for a bit. Todd finished it up by talking about a new tech toy that he recently bought that might get him attacked by a crazed bystander.


image
YouTube (Subscribe)

Running Time: 54:10

Links:

07:22 - 7 Tips For Beginner Podcasters
19:41 - SharePoint 2013 Patch installation script
20:24 - SharePoint 2013 Builds list
23:35 - How to patch the Distributed Cache in SharePoint 2013
39:07 - Parrot AR.Drone 2.0 GPS Edition Quadricopter

UStream Premium Membership (no commercials during the live stream)
SharePoint 2013 Professional Administration

Brought to you by Rackspace

ShortURL: http://www.toddklindt.com/Netcast203

  
No presence informationTodd O. Klindt6/15/2014 8:53 PMNetcast0 

Tonight's netcast delves into the black art of patching SharePoint without destroying your farm in the process. I'm looking at you, recent SharePoint 2013 patches. To be fair I also talk about some new functionality (besides breaking People Search) that April 2014 CU for SharePoint 2013 adds. I also talk about some reference material on virtualizing SharePoint on Hyper-V. I finish up with some of my favorite recent Windows Phone 8.1 tips, and I brag a little about a situation where I kicked the UPS' butt this week.

Audio File

Video File

image

YouTube (Subscribe)

Running Time: 42:14

Links:

1:29 – Production Notes
1:57 – Splunk
3:58 - Topics
3:58 - MS14-022 wiki page
11:48 - Provisioning site collections using SP App model in on-premises with just CSOM
16:02 - Use best practice configurations for the SharePoint 2013 virtual machines and Hyper-V environment
20:05 - User Profile Picture and Certificate Trusts
29:54 - Windows Phone tips
29:54 - Office Remote
31:30 - Files for Windows Phone

UStream Premium Membership (no commercials during the live stream)
SharePoint 2013 Professional Administration

Brought to you by Rackspace

ShortURL: http://www.toddklindt.com/Netcast202

  
No presence informationTodd O. Klindt6/5/2014 10:30 AMNetcast0 

In tonight's episode I go through a list of handy tools that any SharePoint admin worth hizzorher salt should have at the ready. I also talk about a couple of cool PowerShell tips and scripts I discovered in the last week. Then I cover the latest hysterical bug with the SharePoint 2013 April 2014 CU.

Audio File

Video File

headshot2

YouTube (Subscribe)

Running Time: 32:22

Links:

03:55 - ULS Viewer is gone. *sniff* *sniff*
04:32 - I have it archived
07:00 - Tools for your SharePoint 2013 development toolbox
08:28 - SharePoint Manager
09:36 - SharePoint Search Tool
11:30 - Fiddler
12:35 - Reflector
16:30 - Open Scripts in a new tab in the PowerShell ISE using PSEdit
18:32 - Copy all SharePoint Files and Folders Using PowerShell
20:00 - How to Upload Files to SharePoint 2013 with PowerShell
20:53 - Issues converting Classic to Claims in SharePoint 2013 April 2013 CU
23:18 – SharePoint 2013 April 2014 CU Notes 
25:45 - MS14-022
28:30 - Notepad++

UStream Premium Membership (no commercials during the live stream)
SharePoint 2013 Professional Administration

Brought to you by Rackspace

ShortURL: http://www.toddklindt.com/Netcast201

  
No presence informationTodd O. Klindt5/26/2014 8:44 PMNetcast0 

In tonight's Netcast I wax nostalgically on the previous 199 Netcasts. I thank a few of the people that have helped me along the way. Then I go over some of my fondest memories of TechEd, and how you can create some of your own. Then I dig into the fun tech stuff. I talk about how to leverage OneDrive for Business in your on prem SharePoint farm. Next I talk about a Windows Phone update you should download. I follow that up with showing some cool stuff you can do with Cortana once you do. Finally I talk about not virtualizing SQL like a chump, and all the news that's fit to print about the April 2014 CU for SharePoint 2013.
Audio File

Video File

image

YouTube (Subscribe)

Running Time: 48:54

Links:

06:16 – Production Notes
09:15 - 200 episodes!
28:13 - Rename all of your databases with PowerShell
30:18 - TechEd overview
34:18 - All the TechEd 2014 slides and videos
34:50 - Get Up and Running Fast with Microsoft OneDrive for Business: Planning Guidance and Best Practices
37:55 - How to redirect users to Office 365 with OneDrive for Business
38:25 - Windows Phone 8.1 Preview update
40:11 - Have Cortana Wake Your PC by Time and Proximity
44:52 - Making SQL Server Work in VMware and Hyper-V screencast
46:12 - Brent Ozar’s blog
46:35 - April 2014 CU Wiki
47:35 – Shameless Self Promotion

UStream Premium Membership (no commercials during the live stream)
SharePoint 2013 Professional Administration

Brought to you by Rackspace

ShortURL: http://www.toddklindt.com/Netcast200

  
No presence informationTodd O. Klindt5/16/2014 4:25 PMNetcast0 

Tonight's episode is jampacked with SharePointy goodness. I talk about how to install SharePoint 2010 on Windows Server 2012 R2 in a supported fashion. Then I talk about why things take a long time to load up if your SharePoint server doesn't have Internet access. Then I talk a bit about OneDrive for Business and how you can leverage in your on-premises farm. I wrap things up by talking about how you can get good backups on your Windows Phone 8.1 device so you don't lose any of those funny pictures of your cat sleeping in a house plant. All that and more in Netcast 199.

Audio File

Video File

image

YouTube (Subscribe)

Running Time: 37:33

Links:

01:34 Production
03:55 - SharePoint 2010 SP2 ISO has support for Windows Server 2012 R2
12:45 - Best Practices for CRL Checking on SharePoint Servers
13:45 - All kinds of things try to access http://crl.microsoft.com
24:00 - OneDrive for Business Redirection to Office 365 Overview
26:50 - Backing up on Windows Phone 8.1
29:43 - Promotion

UStream Premium Membership (no commercials during the live stream)
SharePoint 2013 Professional Administration

Brought to you by Rackspace

ShortURL: http://www.toddklindt.com/Netcast199

  
No presence informationTodd O. Klindt5/5/2014 11:57 AMSharePoint 20100 

Late last week, or this last weekend Microsoft quietly updated the KB article for SharePoint 2010 Service Pack 2 to call out that if you have access to the MSDN or VL ISO media you can now install SharePoint 2010 on Windows Server 2012 R2. Here’s what they added:

Note: Deployments from the slipstream media at Microsoft Volume License Service Center (VLSC) and MSDN can now be performed on Windows Server 2012 R2 as of May 1, 2014.

This is great news for those of you that will be maintaining SharePoint 2010 for the foreseeable future but want all the cool new stuff in Windows Server 2012 R2. There is a piece missing though. If you do install this on Windows Server 2012 R2 you must either slipstream the February 2014 CU into the new ISO or immediately install the February 2014 CU after installation. The new ISO will install on Windows Server 2012 R2, but it’s not supported on it, if that makes sense.

There are a couple of other notes. First, SharePoint does not support installing Service Pack 2, the February 2014 CU and then upgrading the OS to Windows Server 2012 R2. It must be a fresh installation. I can hear those of you with existing SharePoint 2010 farms getting anxious. Don’t worry, it’s okay, we can get you there. If you dream of Windows Server 2012 R2 servers in your existing SharePoint 2010 it can still be a reality, you just have to work into it a little bit. First, make sure your existing SharePoint 2010 is at the February 2014 CU level (14.0.7116.5000) or higher. Then build a brand new Windows Server 2012 R2 server and install SharePoint 2010 SP2 with the new MSDN or VL ISO. Then patch it to February 2014 CU or whatever patch level your farm is at. You can then add it to your existing farm. If you go that route I would plan to do all the servers in your farm, and sooner rather than later. Each time you add a Windows Server 2012 R2 to your farm, pull out one of the older Windows Servers until they’re all gone. You should plan for that changeover to take days, not weeks, or fortnights. (I’ve clearly been watching too much Game of Thrones).

Also make sure you have a good backup of each of your old servers. Shamefully we all have those file system level tweaks that we’ve made, then forgotten about. Web.config is the usual place they hide out, but they show up other places too. You’ll need to do those by hand when you add the new servers to your farm. The same goes for SSL certs, or any other certs you have.

Good luck. Leave a comment below if you go this route. Let us all know how it turned out.

As always you can keep up to date on all the SharePoint 2010 mayhem at http://www.toddklindt.com/sp2010builds and you can follow my SharePoint 2010 Patches twitter account to get breaking news about SharePoint 2010 patches.

Here is the official SharePoint 2010 support for Windows Server 2012 and Windows Server 2012 R2 KB article. It was last updated to Rev 12 November 21, 2013. It will likely get updated again.

tk

http://www.toddklindt.com/SP2010SP2NewISO

  
No presence informationTodd O. Klindt5/2/2014 9:34 AMNetcast0 

In tonight's action-packed episode I cover all the fun and frivolity of SPTechCon. Then I move on to even funnier topics and I talk about SharePoint 2013 Service Pack 1. I talk about its rerelease and how to tell it apart from its earlier, buggier version. Then I talk a little about OneNote and Surface Pros. Fun for the whole family.

Oh, and the audio and video get a little out of sync at the end. I’m looking into that.

Audio File

Video File

image

YouTube (Subscribe)

Running Time: 42:39

Links:

02:08 - Production Notes
05:21 - SPTechCon recap
14:14 - Windows Weekly
17:45 - SharePoint 2013 Service Pack 1 has been rereleased
19:43 - How to tell which Service Pack 1 you have installed on SharePoint 2013
24:32 - Creating a template in OneNote
27:15 - Comments about applying the new SP1 on top of the SP2013+SP1 ISO - Brian Lalancette's link
28:20 - AutoSPInstaller
28:32 - Educational discount on Surface Pro 2
31:14 - Make your Surface even cooler
34:30 - OneDrive for Business increases storage and adds standalone option

UStream Premium Membership (no commercials during the live stream)
SharePoint 2013 Professional Administration

Brought to you by Rackspace

ShortURL: http://www.toddklindt.com/Netcast198

  
No presence informationTodd O. Klindt4/30/2014 3:31 PMNetcast0 

This episode was filmed at SPTechCon in San Francisco. I let my ugliest fan, Shane Young, cohost with me. Since this was recorded on the road I don't have my regular equipment and the audio and video aren't at the quality you've come to expect. Shane and I talk about some fun PowerShell tips and then dig in to Windows Phone. We show how to project your phone on the screen, how to make my Podcast more tolerable on Windows Phone and much more.

Audio File

Video File

image

YouTube (Subscribe)

Running Time: 55:33

Links:

2:18 - Production Notes
09:10 - Open PowerShell from Explorer
12:02 - Assign value versus compare in PowerShell (put in your blog post)
12:53 - A World of Scripts at your Fingertips – Introducing Script Browser
16:20 - Project your phone on your PC
18:40 - Podcast playback speed
26:02 - Shane's new phone
41:02 - wpcentral.com
50:00 – Shameless Self Promotion

UStream Premium Membership (no commercials during the live stream)
SharePoint 2013 Professional Administration

Brought to you by Rackspace

ShortURL: http://www.toddklindt.com/Netcast197

  
No presence informationTodd O. Klindt4/24/2014 4:32 PMSharePoint 201311 

Edit: 7/3 added MSDN and VL ISO screenshot and explanation

It’s been a fun couple of months for guys like me that watch SharePoint patching. Earlier this month Microsoft discovered a particularly nasty bug in SharePoint 2013 Service Pack 1 and they pulled it. They locked their best and brightest patchmeisters into a room, threw in some Mt. Dew and Snickers bars and had them crank out a newer, better, stronger, more-able-to-be-patched version of Service Pack 1. If you were one of the people that installed the first, broken SP1, the fix is to install the new, shiny SP1 over top of it. The problem is figuring out which version of SP1 you have installed. The new SP1 looks an awful lot like his older brother, right down to the Farm build number (15.0.4569.1000). There is an easy way to tell them apart in Central Administration. Click the Upgrade and Migration link on the left, then Check product and patch installation status. That should take you to the /_admin/PatchStatus.aspx page. A first generation SP1 server will look like this:

image

The two important pieces are the KB article for the patch, KB2817429, and the patch version, 15.0.4569.1506.

A second generation SP1 server will look like this:

image

Its KB number is KB2880552 and it build number is 15.0.4571.1502.

If you installed SharePoint 2013 from MSDN or Volume License (VL) media it might have Service Pack 1 integrated. In that case, everything is okay. It's patch status page looks like this:



If you have the Bad SP1 just install the Good SP1 over top of it like any other update. Don’t forget to run the Config Wizard afterwards to show SharePoint you really mean business. If your server was installed with the MSDN or VL media you can still install the new SP1 over top if you want to be super sure you're up to date.

Don’t forget to follow @SP2013Patches on Twitter and bookmark my SharePoint 2013 Builds page to keep on all the patching craziness.

tk

ShortURL: http://www.toddklindt.com/WhichSP2013SP1

  
No presence informationTodd O. Klindt4/22/2014 1:10 PMSharePoint 20135 

Just as promised, Microsoft has rereleased Service Pack 1 for SharePoint 2013. Hopefully this time with fewer bugs. I haven’t taken it for a full test drive yet, so this blog post will likely get updated in the next few days.

If you have already installed SP1 on your farm, install this new SP1 on top of it, then run the Config Wizard, like you would with any other patch. If you’re at some lower patch level, use the same steps.

Here are some links.

SharePoint Foundation – KBDownload

SharePoint Server – KBDownload

Project Server – KBDownload

Office Web Apps – KBDownload

I have not added this to my SharePoint 2013 Builds Page yet. I’m busy at SPTechCon right now, but I’ll get it added soon.

tk

ShortURL: http://www.toddklindt.com/SP2013SP1Again

  
No presence informationTodd O. Klindt4/16/2014 9:01 PMNetcast0 

Tonight's show is all about Windows Phone 8.1, with a little bit of SharePoint and PowerShell sprinkled in for good measure. We spend the bulk of the show talking about some of my favorite new features in WP 8.1 and how you can get it for yourself. I also talk about a couple of blog posts I've published recently. One on uploading files to SharePoint with PowerShell, another on how to encrypt credentials in PowerShell scripts so they aren't exposed in plain text. Good ideas all around.

Audio File

Video File

image

YouTube (Subscribe)

Running Time: 47:35

Links:

04:30 - The Microsoft Virtual Machine Converter 2.0
05:51 - Vulnerabilities in Microsoft Word and Office Web Apps Could Allow Remote Code Execution (2949660)
07:38 - Windows Phone 8.1
08:58 - wpcentral.com
9:51 - Paul Thurrott's Blog
10:05 - Hands on with the new swipe keyboard in Windows Phone 8.1
12:41 - Action center
16:40 - Quiet hours
21:10 - Cortana
26:40 - Do you want to enable Cortana outside the US? Here's how you do it
29:00 - All you need to know about the Windows Phone 8.1 'Preview for Developers'
33:20 - How to Upload Files to SharePoint 2013 with PowerShell
34:50 - Save Encrypted Passwords to Disk with PowerShell
40:39 - Lori Gowin ( Blog | Twitter )
40:48 - Mike Robbins ( Blog | Twitter )
41:10 - PowerTip: Update Windows Defender with PowerShell
43:00 - Free PowerShell ebooks

UStream Premium Membership (no commercials during the live stream)
SharePoint 2013 Professional Administration

Brought to you by Rackspace

ShortURL: http://www.toddklindt.com/Netcast196

  
No presence informationTodd O. Klindt4/14/2014 9:27 AMPowerShell; SharePoint 2010; SharePoint 20131 

I’ve posted a lot of PowerShell scripts here over the years. Some good, some not-so-good. Okay, mostly not-so-good. Besides my very obvious lack of PowerShell prowess, one thing has constantly bugged me about a few of the scripts I’ve written, they contain passwords in plain text. Here are a few examples:

How to Upload Files to SharePoint 2013 with PowerShell

How to schedule SharePoint backups with PowerShell

The PowerShell script I use to create Active Directory users

Using PowerShell to set up a test environment

How to use PowerShell to replace DCPROMO in Windows Server 2012

In each of those scripts I did a bad, bad thing, I put the password for a privileged account in plain text. Shame on me. My penance for this sin is that I have to write this blog post, explaining a more secure way to handle this situation. I also said “Hail Jeff Snover” 100 times.

The TLDR version is that instead of putting the passwords in plain text in the script, we should save them, encrypted in a file, and use them from there. PowerShell is constantly improving. It’s getting stronger. I’m pretty sure Skynet uses PowerShell when it takes over the world. SharePoint 2010 uses PowerShell v2, which has one way to save encrypted passwords. SharePoint 2013 uses PowerShell v3, which has a better way. I’ll show you both here. Both versions will work with SharePoint 2013, only the first will work with SharePoint 2010. And yes, while you can install PowerShell v3 on a server running SharePoint 2010, you can’t use the SharePoint 2010 SnapIn in PowerShell v3, so you’d have to use the PowerShell v2 regardless.

SharePoint 2010 (PowerShell v2)

First, we need to create the file that contains the encrypted password. Here is the PowerShell I use to do that:

# Create-EncryptedPasswordFile
$password = Read-Host "Enter Password: " -AsSecureString
$filename = Read-Host "Enter file to save as: "
$secure = ConvertFrom-SecureString $password
$secure | Out-File $filename

Here’s what it looks like in practice:

image

The password I entered was the venerable pass@word1. You can see the file it creates is plain text, but it bears no resemblance at all to pass@word1 so bad guys can’t see what your passwords are.

Of course creating the encrypted password is only half the battle, and maybe even the easy half. You actually have to be able to use the password for this to be any fun. Let’s look at the How to Upload Files to SharePoint 2013 with PowerShell blog post. Scenario 2 could take advantage of this. Let’s look at the piece of the original script that dealt with authentication:

# Since we’re doing this remotely, we need to authenticate
$securePassword = ConvertTo-SecureString "pass@word1" -AsPlainText -Force
$credentials = New-Object System.Management.Automation.PSCredential ("contoso\johnsmith", $securePassword)

There’s that password in plain text <shudder>. Let’s fix that. Here’s what it would look like using the file we created above:

# Since we’re doing this remotely, we need to authenticate
$temp = Get-Content C:\temp\secretfile.txt
$securePassword = ConvertTo-SecureString -String $temp

$credentials = New-Object System.Management.Automation.PSCredential ("contoso\johnsmith", $securePassword)

Now you can run your scripts with piece of mind. Let’s check out the SharePoint 2013 version.

SharePoint 2013 (PowerShell v3)

The PowerShell v3 method is a little smoother. Here’s how we create the file:

# Create-EncryptedCredentialFile
$credentials = Get-Credential
$filename = 'C:\temp\secretfile.txt’
$credentials | Export-CliXml -Path $filename

Notice that the file stores both the username and the password, not just the password like the v2 version. Here’s how you would use it in the same example as above:

# Since we’re doing this remotely, we need to authenticate
$credPath = 'C:\temp\secretfile.txt’
$credentials = Import-CliXml -Path $credPath

That would replace the entire section, not just the yellow highlighted pieces that the PowerShell v2 solution replaces. It’s also important to know that only the user that exported the file can import it. This is great from a security standpoint, but it gets tricky if you are using the exported credentials for scheduled tasks. If that’s the case you’ll need to log in as (or at least run PowerShell as) the service account and export the file that way.

Wrapping It Up

Muuuuch better. We didn’t have to force PowerShell to do anything it doesn’t want to do. Now, no matter what access a bad guy has to your server, short of a key logger, they have no way of figuring out your password. Now, if they have that file, and they know what it is and what account it’s for they can use it to do stuff as that account. So you still need to keep your scripts and this password file secure. This can be used for good though, too. Now you can write scripts that run as a specific account without the person running that script needing to know what the password is, or being able to discover it. This is great for people building SharePoint farms, or support personnel.

I’d like to apologize for publishing PowerShell scripts that might encourage bad behavior. Please forgive me. In the future I’ll try to use this more secure method for baking passwords in. Hopefully you can also use this technique to make your environments more secure too.

I would also like to give a hearty “Thanks” to Lori Gowin (Blog | Twitter) and Mike Robbins (Blog | Twitter). They both very graciously read through this blog post multiple times and offered several valuable suggestions. It sucks way less because of their input. Thanks again.

tk

http://www.toddklindt.com/PoshSecurePasswords

  
No presence informationTodd O. Klindt4/9/2014 10:50 PMNetcast0 

In tonight's Netcast I discuss the fun and frivolity around SharePoint 2013 Service Pack 1 and its strict "no patches for you!" policy. I talk about the User Profile Service and PowerShell briefly and show you a way to reduce your chances of screwing up your Production farm by a solid 17%. Then I talk at length about the new Update to Windows 8.1/2012 R2 and a few things to look forward to in Windows Phone 8.1.

Audio File

Video File

image

YouTube (Subscribe)

Running Time: 50:51

Links:

04:55 - Don’t Install SharePoint 2013 Service Pack 1
13:36 - Change Central Admin Theme
16:01 - User Profile MySite Cleanup Job
18:36 - Improve Surface sound for practically nothing
20:54 - Download PowerShell 5.0 Preview
21:39 - Installing Software with the OneGet Module in PowerShell version 5
26:13 - What's new in Windows 8.1 Update?
26:38 - Windows 8.1 Update blog post
31:59 - Exploring Windows 8.1 Update
31:54 - Windows Phone 8.1 Great Features
40:01 - Sign up as a Windows Phone Developer
43:38 - Windows in the car

UStream Premium Membership (no commercials during the live stream)
SharePoint 2013 Professional Administration

Brought to you by Rackspace

ShortURL: http://www.toddklindt.com/Netcast195

  
No presence informationTodd O. Klindt4/6/2014 10:15 PMSharePoint 2010; SharePoint 2013; PowerShell10 

Every once in a while I get to add a little flair to a project I’m working on. Recently I was working on a couple of projects that intersected, sort of. First, I’ve been writing some scripts to automate some processes we have. These scripts do some pretty good logging to the file system in case there are problems. The average person would have stopped there, but not me. I wanted to take it a step farther. I added a bit where the script uploads the log files to a SharePoint document library. This makes them easier to get to for support personnel, and it makes it easier to search through them for specific issues. SharePoint saves the day again.

The other project I’ve working on is making my Netcast production more automated. Part of that process was using PowerShell to edit the MP3 tags on my Netcast files. While I was pretty proud of that, the previous project made me  realize I could take things one step further and have that same script go ahead and upload the MP3 file when it’s finished. One less thing for me to put off when I’m procrastinating. Hooray efficiency. Plus I get braggin’ rights. Score!

On the surface, these two things sound like they’re the same thing, uploading files to SharePoint. Once you get into the weeds though, they’re actually different. In the first case I’m uploading a file to a local SharePoint server. This is pretty simple. While PowerShell doesn’t have a Upload-SPFile cmdlet we’re pretty close to it. Easy peasy. In the second case I’m uploading the files to a remote SharePoint server. Since it’s a remote server we can’t just add the SharePoint PowerShell module and use the same techniques as we would with a local server. Subtle differences, but important differences. As I was searching for “Upload files to SharePoint with PowerShell” I found most articles covered one or the other. Which is very handy if your situation matches the article’s. Not so handy if they don’t. So I wrote this blog post to cover both scenarios.

Scenario 1: Uploading Files to SharePoint on the SharePoint Server

Here’s a quick example of how to upload a document on a SharePoint server using the SharePoint PowerShell module which uses the SharePoint Object Model.

# Set the variables
$WebURL = “http://portal.contoso.com/sites/stuff”
$DocLibName = “Docs”
$FilePath = “C:\Docs\stuff\Secret Sauce.docx”

# Get a variable that points to the folder
$Web = Get-SPWeb $WebURL
$List = $Web.GetFolder($DocLibName)
$Files = $List.Files

# Get just the name of the file from the whole path
$FileName = $FilePath.Substring($FilePath.LastIndexOf("\")+1)

# Load the file into a variable
$File= Get-ChildItem $FilePath

# Upload it to SharePoint
$Files.Add($DocLibName +"/" + $FileName,$File.OpenRead(),$false)
$web.Dispose()

In the case we use the Add member of the SPFileCollection class. It has a few overloads, so check them out, there might be one that better fits what you’re trying to do.

Scenario 2: Uploading Files to SharePoint from a Remote Machine

Since we can’t use the object model to upload files remotely we have to go about it a different way. I use the WebClient object, though there might be other ways. Here’s an example:

# Set the variables
$destination = "http://portal.contoso.com/sites/stuff/Docs”
$File = get-childitem “C:\Docs\stuff\Secret Sauce.docx”

# Since we’re doing this remotely, we need to authenticate
$securePasssword = ConvertTo-SecureString "pass@word1" -AsPlainText -Force
$credentials = New-Object System.Management.Automation.PSCredential ("contoso\johnsmith", $securePasssword)

# Upload the file
$webclient = New-Object System.Net.WebClient
$webclient.Credentials = $credentials
$webclient.UploadFile($destination + "/" + $File.Name, "PUT", $File.FullName)

Like the SPFileCollection class’ Add member, the UploadFile member of the WebClient class has a few overloads to consider. Check them out so you know what your options are.

PowerShell is cool. SharePoint is cool. Uploading files is cool. It just makes sense to use PowerShell to upload files to SharePoint. Hopefully this blog post covers all the scenarios you might encounter.

tk

ShortURL: http://www.toddklindt.com/PoshUploadFiles

Edit 4/8/2014 – 1,000 apologies. The code in Scenario 2 didn’t work. I should have checked it better. It’s all good now.

  
No presence informationTodd O. Klindt4/3/2014 11:03 AMSharePoint 201329 

This morning Microsoft updated the KB article for SharePoint Service Pack 1 with this notice:

We have recently uncovered an issue with this Service Pack 1 package that may prevent customers who have Service Pack 1 from deploying future public or cumulative updates. As a precautionary measure, we have deactivated the download page until a new package is published.

If you haven’t installed this in your Production environment yet, please hold off. If you have it in a Test or Dev environment go ahead and keep testing it. I’ll update this blog post as I get more information.

Bill Baer (he's a big deal at Microsoft) has stated that the MSDN ISO that has SP1 included is not impacted by this issue.

To keep up on all the SharePoint 2013 patch happenings you can check out my SharePoint 2013 Builds page. You can also follow my SP2013Patches Twitter account where I tweet out SharePoint 2013 patch related information.

FAQs (added 4/7/2014)

Q1) I was going to install SharePoint 2013 in a new farm with Service Pack 1 in a week (a day, 17 minutes, etc). This seems scary, should I still do it?

A2) First, breathe, it's gonna be okay. :) If I were installing a new farm in the next couple of days I would not install it with Service Pack 1. I would either install the farm with the March 2013 Public Update, or I'd wait a few days to see what Microsoft says about how to fix existing farms with Service Pack 1.

Q2) But, but, but I already have Service Pack 1 installed in my Production farm. Woe is me! Am I screwed? Am I going to have to quit SharePoint and become a Notes administrator? My family will be so ashamed!

A2) I would, never, ever recommend anyone take drastic action like becoming a Notes administrator. That's the kind of shame that doesn't wash off. If you currently have a Production farm with Service Pack 1 on it you're fine. Microsoft will fix this. They promise, and I believe them. I know, I know, "patching the patch that makes it so you can't install another patch" is pretty funny to think about, but I'm sure they can pull it off.

Q3) What if I have Service Pack 1 in a Test farm? Can it infect my Production farm?

A3) Test farms are fine. If you're currently testing Service Pack 1 in a Test farm, keep on keepin' on. When the Service Pack 1 fix comes out drop it into your Test farm and see what happens. I would still plan on putting Service Pack 1 on your Production farm eventually.

Q4) I installed a new SharePoint 2013 farm using the MSDN ISO that had Service Pack 1 baked in. Am I in trouble, too?

A4) No, you're fine. Bill Baer told me that this issue only affects farms that were patched to Service Pack 1. Farms that were installed with the MSDN ISO are not affected. If you used an RTM ISO and slipstreamed Service Pack 1 in you are affected. But like I said in A2, you'll be fine.

tk

http://www.toddklindt.com/SP2013SP1kaput

Edit: Added piece about the MSDN ISO

Edit (4/7/2014): Added the FAQs

  
No presence informationTodd O. Klindt4/2/2014 10:53 PMWindows 8/8.12 

Today was the first day of Microsoft’s Build conference and it was busy. They announced a bunch of new products. Some available soon, some available not so soon. One of the most exciting things coming out soon is the Update to Windows 8.1. It’s already available on MSDN, and it will trickle out as a series of patches next week on Patch Tuesday. Being the impatient guy that I am, I downloaded it and installed it today. In this blog post I’ll talk about some of the install particulars and I’ll also cover some of the new features.

Installation

If you have an MSDN subscription you can go out there now and download the Update today. There are three downloads, one for x86, and one for x64, and one for ARM. Grab whichever ones are appropriate for your existing Windows 8.1 devices. The x64 version will also work for any Windows 2012 R2 servers you have laying around.

When you download the package it’s a zip file containing six Windows patches and a readme file. The readme file provides some guidance on which order you’ll need to install the patches. Don’t be surprised if you already have any of the patches. Every machine of mine that I patched today already had KB2919442. The KB2919355 patch is 700 MB and seems to be the bulk of the update. I had to reboot after installing each patch, so be prepared for that.

If you don’t have an MSDN account, or you’re just more patient than I am, then you’ll get all these patches as part of the regular Windows Update process. So make sure you have Windows set to download and install new patches as they come out.

Features

There are a ton of new features in the Update. I’m not going to be able to cover them all in this post. When you get done here, check out Paul Thurrott’s review. He covers a bunch of things I don’t.

The big focus on this Update, much like the update to Window 8.1 is making things better for people using mice and on desktop PCs. Several features help that out. Probably the most notable is that there is now a Search button, and sometimes a Power button in the upper right corner of the Start Screen, next to the user’s name.

image

Both of these functions were already available from the Charms bar, but that can be tough to coax out with a mouse and not everybody knows about the Win + C hotkey. Also, if you’re accessing the machine through remote control software, or virtual machine software, it just might not be possible. Once you have the Update installed you’ll be able to hit the Start Button, then either the Power or Search buttons. Oddly, the Power button does not show up on tablets. It only shows up on Desktop PCs and laptops. Paul goes into it more in his article, but Microsoft has decided the Power button wasn’t a good fit for devices they consider slates. The Search button simply brings out the Search bar. Both Search and Power work exactly the same from the buttons as they would if you fired them up from the Charms bar.

Another nod to Desktop users can be found in the PC Settings area. While Microsoft has been diligent about adding more and more settings in the Metro Change PC Settings pages, there always seems to be one setting that’s just not there. Now there’s a “control panel” link at the bottom that takes you to the Desktop Control Panel. If you can’t find it there, it can’t be found.

While we’re talking about PC Settings, another one of our prayers has been answered. We can finally remove wireless networks. In the Networks page click Manage Networks to get a list of the all the wireless networks your machine has connected to. Click one to remove it.

image

Metro apps coexist with the Desktop a little better with the Update. It’s now possible to pin Metro apps to the Taskbar, and the Update pins the Microsoft Store for you to get you started. Metro apps also have a title bar that drops down when you hover near the top of the screen. This title bar has minimize and close buttons, like we’re used to seeing in Desktop apps.

Microsoft has also made it marginally easier to locate new applications after you’ve installed them. After an application has been installed there will be a reminder in the lower right corner of the Start Screen. If you go to the Applications view all newly installed applications will be highlighted. While this isn’t a homerun, by any means, it is a step in the right direction.

The update wasn’t aimed solely at Desktop PCs, tablets got some love too. Namely, Microsoft wants to expand its market share in the tablet space in the worst way. Today at Build they announced that there will be no licensing fees for Windows devices with screens smaller than 9”. I expect to see a flood of devices with 8.999999” screens any day. Along with that, the 8.1 Update includes better support for machines with limited RAM and small amounts of storage. With this Update Windows 8.1 will support running on devices with as little as 1 GB of RAM, and 16 GB of storage. It does this by trimming the OS down, and by running it out of a compressed WIM file. This feature requires an SSD and will only be available for new devices. When I upgraded my Dell Venue 8 Pro it was not able to take advantage of this. I think this is a step in the right direction. I feel part of the reason Windows 8 tablets never took off was because Microsoft strictly controlled the hardware it could go on, and those hardware specs were pretty tight. They wanted to make sure everyone had a good experience, but I think it bit them. I think the combination of free licensing, and better support for low cost hardware will result in us seeing a lot more Windows devices in the wild.

So go out there and install the Update. Let me know in the Comments section how it went for you.

tk

ShortURL: http://www.toddklindt.com/Win81Update

  
No presence informationTodd O. Klindt4/2/2014 3:42 PMNetcast0 

I start this Netcast with a funny picture about cumulative updates, and a funny video of someone trying to watch my show. Then I dig into some deep disaster recovery topics on how to build a warm recovery farm, and how to get Workflow Manager ready to be highly available. Then we chat about changing service accounts and special characters in PowerShell. I finish up with giving a priceless productivity tip in OneNote, and show you how to get your entire Twitter history.

Audio File

Video File

image

YouTube (Subscribe)

Running Time: 44:13

Links:

03:41 - Why I don't install Cus right away
04:35 - Me on TV
06:35 - Hot-Standby/Disaster-Recovery SharePoint Farms – Basic Setup & Failover
18:30 - Workflow Manager Disaster Recovery – Preparations
21:35 - Changing SharePoint 2010’s Service Account Passwords
27:43 - How To Add A Page in OneNote Exactly Where You Want It
31:41 - Windows Phone 8.1 is finished!
33:13 - Windows Phone 8.1 Features
37:28 - Request your Twitter archive

UStream Premium Membership (no commercials during the live stream)
SharePoint 2013 Professional Administration

Brought to you by Rackspace

ShortURL: http://www.toddklindt.com/Netcast194

  
No presence informationTodd O. Klindt4/1/2014 3:49 PMWindows 8/8.110 

With the release of Windows 8.1, and soon the Update to Windows 8.1 now is as good a time as any to go ahead and ditch Window 7, or heaven forbid Windows XP, and embrace Windows 8 with both arms wide open. When Windows 8 came out, it got some negative press, some of which was even earned. In this article I’m going to give my top ten 11 tips on how to make Windows 8 the daily driver on your desktop PC without pulling your hair out, or using Satya Nadella’s name in vain.

1) Update to Windows 8.1, then Windows 8.1 Update

I almost feel silly saying this, but keep your OS up to date. Windows 8.1 came out several months ago and took some huge strides in making Windows 8 better for desktop PCs. Unfortunately Microsoft didn’t do a good job promoting it, or making it easy for the average user to stumble across. It’s almost like it’s a prize at the end of a treasure hunt. It’s a free upgrade, so there’s no reason not to install it. And for my readers that say, “We always wait until Service Pack 1,” well, wait no more, this IS Service Pack 1. Besides, a bunch of the following tips will require Windows 8.1, so go ahead and install it. Once you do, you’ll be the envy of all your friends in your Wednesday night bowling league. I promise.

Now that I’ve convinced you to install it you’re probably wondering how to install it. That gets a little tricky. You get Windows 8.1 from the Microsoft Store. So if you don’t go there, you’ll never see it. You can get there by hitting the Store icon on the Start Screen, or going to the Start Screen and just typing “Store.” If you don’t see it right away when you go to the Store it might be because you haven’t installed all the Windows Patches needed. Go back to the Start Screen and type “update” and install the Windows Updates. All of them. You will probably get to reboot a few times, so make sure you have a good book handy. Then go back to the store and hopefully Windows 8.1 will be waiting for you.

The Windows 8.1 download is huge. It’s over 3 GB. That’s like a whole season of House of Cards and some Scooby Doo cartoons on Netflix. Make sure to give it some time to run in the background. While you’re waiting, you can read up on what’s new in Windows 8.1. You can also buy the Windows 8.1 Field Guide from Paul Thurrott. 

2) Boot To Desktop

One of the many desktop friendly changes that came with Windows 8.1 was the ability to boot directly to the Desktop. You know, how we’re used to Windows booting for the last 20 years or so. When Windows 8 came out it debuted the infamous Start Screen. Which is absolutely fabulous on things with a touch screen, but absolutely dismal on things without. In Windows 8 there was no way around the Start Screen. Every time your machine powered on you had to click the Desktop tile on the Start Screen to get to the Desktop. In Windows 8.1 they added the glorious “Boot to Desktop” option. To activate it right click on the Taskbar (after you’ve clicked that blasted Desktop tile one final, satisfying time) and click Properties. In the Properties box click the Navigation tab. Check the box next to go to desktop, then click Ok.

image

While you’re in that page read over the other options. There are some other good ones in there like “Show my desktop background on Start” and my favorite, the one that replaces the crusty old Command Prompt with sleek, sexy PowerShell.

3) Expand Taskbar Items

While you’re in the Taskbar properties go ahead and change another one of my favorite settings, Taskbar buttons. This setting lets you control how large the taskbar buttons are. By default it is set to “Always combine, hide labels.” This means the taskbar buttons will always be small, regardless of how much empty space the Taskbar has. That’s just wasteful! I much prefer the “Combine when taskbar is full” setting. If you’re using a desktop PC you probably have decent sized monitors and plenty of space on your taskbar. No reason to not take advantage of that space. It also makes them easier to click with a mouse, as they are a larger target.

image

As a bonus, this setting works on Windows 8 and Windows 7 too.

4) Only use Desktop Internet Explorer

With Windows 8 the emphasis was very clearly touch devices, which is great for touch devices. Not so great for non-touch devices. One instance of this was with Internet Explorer. For maximum confusion and frustration, Windows 8/8.1 comes with two separate versions of Internet Explorer. One is the Desktop version we’ve been using since Alta Vista was the search engine of choice. The second version, we’ll call it Metro IE, is optimized for the touch experience. The problem is depending how a web page is opened, you might get Desktop IE or Metro IE. If you’re on a Desktop PC, Metro IE es no bueno.

Fortunately there’s a way to control this behavior and set it so your web pages always open up in Desktop IE. Open up Desktop IE and click the settings cog in the upper right, then click “Internet options.” The setting we’re looking for is at the top of the Programs tab. Select “Always in Internet Explorer on the desktop.”

image

After you change that, no matter how you stumble on that next link of glorious hysterical cat videos, it will open in Desktop IE.

5) Install Desktop Skype

Along those same lines, the version of Skype that comes with Windows 8/8.1 is a Metro app. And while it works okay in a touch environment, it’s very painful in a Desktop environment. It’s clumsy and it takes up too much screen space. And I’m pretty sure it ate the last Funyuns, then put the empty bag back in the cupboard.  There’s good news though, you can install the Desktop version of Skype and get back to how Skype should be. Just download the desktop client and install it. Go ahead and pin it to your Start Screen. Make sure you pin “Skype for desktop” not just “Skype” which is the disappointing Metro version.

6) Type on the Start Page

One of the big problems with the new Metro interface is that it’s tough to discover things. You can’t just click or right click around and find them. One of Windows 8’s hidden gems is that when you’re on the Start Screen, you can just start typing and Windows will automatically start searching for you. Can’t find a program you installed? Just start typing. Looking for a particular setting? Just start typing. Looking for that picture of the baby throwing up on Grandpa? Just start typing. It’s pretty handy once you get used to using it.

7) Scroll Down for Apps

This is another thing that was improved in Windows 8.1, the ability to find apps that aren’t pinned on the Start Screen. Once Windows 8.1 is installed we get a handy down arrow in the lower left corner of the Start Screen. When it’s clicked it shows us all the applications installed on the machine. There are a variety of ways to sort and filter the apps, depending on what you’re looking for.

image

If you still can’t find what you’re looking for, you can use the old “just start typing” trick we talked about above. By default Search has the focus, so if you just can’t find that new version of Mahjongg you installed, you can type “mah” and it should pop right up.

8) Right Click on the Start Button for more Goodies

The most celebrated feature added in Windows 8.1 was the return of the Start Button. That alone is great for us Desktop users and cause for much celebration. It makes it a lot easier to get to the Start Screen, especially if it’s in a VM or RDP window. Along with having the glorious Start Button Microsoft stuffed a whole bunch of shortcuts into the context menu of the Start Button. Go ahead, right click on it and see what’s there.

image

And if right-clicking isn’t your thing, you can hit the Win+X shortcut key to get to it too. Here’s a full list of the rest of the Windows 8 Keyboard shortcuts. There’s some gold in them there hills.

9) Install Modern Mix

On a slate, full screen, finger friendly Metro apps work well. On a 24” monitor it seems a bit unnecessary for Solitaire to get the whole 24 inches. And splitting the screen with the Desktop doesn’t cut it either. Unfortunately there’s no way out of the box to run Metro apps anything but full screen or split screen. Some apps, like Skype and IE have both Metro and Desktop versions, but most don’t. We must have all been really good, and eaten our vegetables as children, because there’s a thing called Modern Mix that addresses this need. For a measly $5 you can run Metro apps inside of windows on the Desktop. And if the $5 price tag wasn’t enough for you to just buy it sight unseen it has a free 30 day trial. That’s more than enough time for you to fall in love with it.

10) Pin Metro Apps to the Taskbar

With Modern Mix, or the soon to be released (as of March 2014) Update to Windows 8.1, it will be possible to pin Metro apps to the Desktop’s Taskbar. This gives you quick access to some of your favorite Metro apps. When you install the Update it automatically pins the Store app there to get you started.

11) Make Good Use of Multiple Monitors

These days it seems you’re just not cool unless you have multiple monitors. I know I wasn’t cool until I did. Traditionally Windows hasn’t done a great job handling that. In the past I’ve had to buy 3rd party software to manage them the way that I want to. Windows 8 is the first Windows where that hasn’t been necessary. If Windows detects multiple monitors it lights up some configuration for them, including my favorite, which puts the buttons for programs only on the Taskbar of the monitor where they are running.

image

When Windows first started really supporting multiple monitors well (Vista, maybe?) the taskbar started on your main monitor and the programs were just in the order that you opened them. It was possible to click a program in the Taskbar on monitor 1, but have the program itself pop up in monitor 2 or 3. Highly annoying. You can still have this behavior in Windows 8, if you like to be annoyed, but you can also tell Windows to put the program’s button in the taskbar of the monitor where it’s really at. 3 out of 4 dentists agree that is better.

When Windows 8 came out it was much maligned by people not using slates, and rightfully so. Microsoft heard our pleas though, and they’ve addressed a lot of those issues. If you haven’t already taken Windows 8 for a spin, now is a great time. Using these 11 tips will ensure that your experience is at least 26% better. That’s just science.

tk

ShortURL: http://www.toddklindt.com/DontHateWindows8

  
No presence informationTodd O. Klindt3/29/2014 4:31 PMTech Stuff8 

Sometimes I feel like I’m a little slow picking things up, kind of like the kid at the back of the class eating paste. Today is one of those days. As I’ve talked about in my Netcasts, I use OneNote a lot. Every day. I’d be miserable without it. I’d give up sliced bread before I gave up OneNote. One of my biggest complaints is that there is no automated way to sort the pages (the things along the right hand side), either alphabetically or numerically. Over the years I’ve kept sections (the things across the top) for customers, projects, and Netcasts. All things that benefit greatly from having the pages (still on the right) in a predictable order. For years I’ve clicked “Add Page” at the top of the pages column, which puts my shiny new page allllll the way at the bottom of the pages. Then, like a punk, I drag it up to wherever I want. It’s pretty inefficient and it always makes me feel rotten about myself.

And then today happened. 

I was in OneNote, like I always am, and I noticed this little gem:

image

Being the curious, and not very smart, sort, I clicked it to see what would happen. What happened was marvelous! Miraculous! Super seriously cool! It created a page, right there!!!! You read that right, right there! No more dragging the page up from the deep depths of the page list. I didn’t think it was possible, but I think I love OneNote even more today than I did yesterday.

If you haven’t already seen, OneNote is free. And you can Email your notes into OneNote with me@onenote.com. And I also heard that it was OneNote that invented magnets, and just gave the world that technology. True story.

tk

ShortURL: http://www.toddklindt.com/OneNotePageMiracle

  
No presence informationTodd O. Klindt3/27/2014 9:36 PMNetcast0 

Tonight's Netcast is a busy one. We take some time to talk about a new SharePoint Foundation patch and when you should install it. We also talk about some fancy footwork you can do to slipstream patches with the March 2013 PU. The we chat a little about SQL Server 2014 and what you'll need to do if you want to use it with SharePoint 2013. Speaking of SQL Server, we also talk about some new replication options with SQL. I wrap things up by showing off some cool new OneNote functionality that utilizes email and sharks with lasers on their heads.

Audio File

Video File

image

YouTube (Subscribe)

Running Time: 44:13

Links:

7:20 - March 2014 PU for Foundation
9:45 - Slipstreaming SP2013 with March 2013 PU and a later CU
13:00 - SharePoint 2013 April 2014 CU needed
19:05 - Support for SQL Server Always On Async Replication with SharePoint 2013
25:45 - Fun configuring Office web apps 2013 (OWA)
29:48 - SPC videos on Channel 9
31:25 - Script to download SPC videos
33:45 - Email your notes into OneNote with me@onenote.com

UStream Premium Membership (no commercials during the live stream)
SharePoint 2013 Professional Administration

Brought to you by Rackspace

ShortURL: http://www.toddklindt.com/Netcast193

  
No presence informationTodd O. Klindt3/24/2014 3:14 PMNetcast2 

Tonight's show covers a bunch of topics. We talk about how to get some of that great SharePoint Conference content without actually going to Vegas. For free! Then I cover some other free stuff like OneNote and Office Lens. Oslo is so cool that we cover it two weeks in a row. Continuing on the topic of Search we talk about some complications with Search in Foundation and moving temp directories around. If Incoming Email is your deal, I talk a little about how that has changed in SharePoint 2013.


Audio File

Video File

image

YouTube (Subscribe)

Running Time: 47:47

Links:

1:09 – FanatiBlaster
9:25 - Download all of the SharePoint Conference videos and PowerPoint presentations
13:35 - OneNote is free
15:58 - Office Lens is also free
21:45 - Introducing codename Oslo and the Office Graph
23:46 - Search in Foundation
28:57 - Incoming email changes
32:30 - SharePoint 2013 Search IO critical component locations

UStream Premium Membership (no commercials during the live stream)
SharePoint 2013 Professional Administration

Brought to you by Rackspace

ShortURL: http://www.toddklindt.com/Netcast192

  
No presence informationTodd O. Klindt3/17/2014 2:06 PMNetcast0 

In this episode I talk about all the fun I had at the SharePoint Conference. I cover our sessions and some of the other events that were there. Then I talk about Service Pack 1 for SharePoint 2013, and how super cool it is. Then I cover a couple of new things to look forward to if you have a Windows tablet.

I did some new things with the audio and video this week. Let me know what you think of the changes.

Audio File

Video File

image

YouTube (Subscribe)

Running Time: 43:39

Links:

2:15 - SharePoint Conference overview
18:00 - Top 25 SharePoint Influencers
26:23 - SharePoint 2013 Service Pack 1
31:30 - Added Workflow Manager to SharePoint 2013 Builds list
33:49 - Cannot add items to a SharePoint 2010 list created with SharePoint Designer after August 2013 CU
34:30 - How to use USB devices with your Dell Venue 8 Pro and charge it at the same time
38:54 - Surface Power Cover receives ship date and price

UStream Premium Membership (no commercials during the live stream)
SharePoint 2013 Professional Administration

Brought to you by Rackspace

ShortURL: http://www.toddklindt.com/Netcast191

  
No presence informationTodd O. Klindt3/8/2014 9:25 PMWindows 8/8.160 

Edit 6/28/14 - See this blog post for a Kickstarter project for a dock that does this.

Edit 9/26/14 - Dell released an official Data and Charging Dongle.

Edit 11/18/2014: The Plugable dock can now be purchased directly from Amazon

 

A couple of months ago, because of my addiction to gadgets and all things shiny, I bought a Dell Venue 8 Pro (affectionately referred to as the “DV8”). It’s an 8” tablet running a full version of Windows 8.1. You can read Paul Thurrott’s review here. It’s been a fun little mini-tablet, fitting somewhere between my Nokia 920 phone and my Surface Pro 2 in functionality. One of its biggest frustrations has been that it’s not possible to charge the DV8 and connect USB devices like a thumb drive to it. The DV8 has a single USB port, and it’s a USB OTG port. This means a single USB port is used to charge the DV8 and hook up peripherals. To charge the DV8, simply plug in any old USB charger into the USB port. Violà, it’s charging! If you want to hook any kind of USB device to it, a thumb drive, a keyboard, a rocket launcher, you need a USB OTG cable. If you have a DV8, it’s worth it to order a handful of these. They’re cheap enough, and it’s good to have one around when you need one. Unfortunately you can’t connect both, so you have to choose; juice or peripherals. Normally when I’m told something isn’t possible, I shrug my shoulders and then go off and eat some cookies. This time, I rolled up my sleeves, headed out to the Internet, and found a solution.

Before we dig in, let me be clear, I didn’t figure this out. I saw a post on a forum somewhere and ordered the cables from there. It was probably on WP Central or XDA Developers. Either way, I can’t find it now. If someone finds the post or thread, leave it in a comment below and I’ll link it up. Thanks to a comment left below, I believe the original place I saw this was on a thread on TabletReview.

The DV8 isn’t the only device with a USB OTG port. Many Android tablets and phones have one too. With the help of special splitter cables, they’re able to charge while devices are connected. Those cables alone won’t work with the DV8. There is a handshake that the DV8 does when a device is connected to the USB OTG port and the DV8 chooses to ignore devices if it sees the charger handshake. With a handful of cables and adapters we’re able to trick the DV8 into seeing the charger, then not seeing the charger. Kind of like the old “quarter behind the ear” trick I do with my kids. Here’s the pieces you’ll need:

image

#1 - USB Male to Micro USB Male Charging Data Cable w/ Switch for Samsung Galaxy Tab 3 - Black (100 CM)

#2 - CY U2-166 USB Female to Micro USB Female + Micro USB Male Adapter Cable - Black (15cm)

#3 - USB Female to Micro USB Female Adapter – Black

Deal Extreme is the only place I could find these three cables. Be warned, it took three weeks (yikes!) for me to get my cables. Together they cost less than $10, so go ahead and order them now. Sometime, right after three weeks or so I’m guessing, you’ll wish that you had.

Cable #1 has a switch to switch between Charge and Data. It’s the piece that makes this all work. When we connect this whole contraption to our DV8 it needs to be in the Charge position. The DV8 will see the Charge signal and start charging. The key is that it doesn’t continue to check for the Charge signal. After it starts charging we can flip the switch to the Data side and it will recognize any USB devices connected to #3. #2 sits between them and splits out the charging and data sides. Here are the steps:

  1. Switch the Charge / Data switch on #1 to Charge
  2. Plug the charger into the female micro USB connector on #2
  3. Plug #3 into the male micro USB connector on #2 if it’s not already
  4. Plug in the charger to the wall
  5. Plug your USB device to #3 (it should power up)
  6. Plug #1 into your DV8
  7. Verify that the DV8 is charging, if it’s not, unplug #1 from the DV8 and plug it back in
  8. Once the DV8 is charging, flip the switch on #1 to Data

Here is a picture of it all connected:

image

If you look closely you’ll see my awesome SharePoint 2007 USB drive is attached to cable #2 and the whole shebang is connected to the DV8. Here’s a screenshot to prove it’s both charging and reading my SharePoint 2007 USB drive:

image

You can hook any kind of USB device to #3, including a hub. If you use this contraption you’ll have to use a USB charger to power the USB devices. If you unplug the charger all the devices go away too. If that happens, switch #1 into Charge and plug it all back in again.

This has been one of my biggest frustrations with the Dell Venue 8 Pro. I’m glad some anonymous person on the Internet was able to find a solution. Thanks anonymous Internet person!

tk

ShortURL: http://www.toddklindt.com/ChargeDV8

Edit 3/12/2014: Added link to original thread

  
No presence informationTodd O. Klindt2/27/2014 8:40 PMNetcast0 

Tonight's session is brimming with excitement about SharePoint Conference. And I put a happy ending to the sordid tale of when I tried to buy a Lumia 520. Then I talk about some email addresses that SharePoint hates, and what's new with OneDrive and Office Web Apps. Finally I talk about the secret to how to get a busy person to respond to your emails.
Audio File

Video File

image

YouTube (Subscribe)

Running Time: 50:52

Links:

3:50 - SPC Blog Post
11:10 - Xbox Music Pass and Lumia 520
22:25 - Nokia Treasure Tags
24:56 - Glance update for Nokia phones
27:58 - SharePoint doesn't like + in email address for Site Collection owners
31:06 - Install OneDrive for Business client
33:20 - Office Web Apps renamed to Office Online
36:20 - Microsoft announces upcoming spring update for Windows 8.1
38:30 - How to get a busy person to respond to your email

UStream Premium Membership (no commercials during the live stream)
SharePoint 2013 Professional Administration

Brought to you by Rackspace

ShortURL: http://www.toddklindt.com/Netcast190

  
No presence informationTodd O. Klindt2/23/2014 9:31 PMSharepoint2 

I can’t believe it’s almost here. Less than a week to SPC. To help you all (and honestly myself) keep track of where I’ll be and when I’ll be there I put my schedule in this blog post. As I get more things nailed down I’ll edit this post. You can also put the sessions in your calendar on MySPC. Don’t forget you can also set up meetings in MySPC. I’m going to be fairly busy, but I’ll try to accept meetings if I get some requests. I’ll also be hanging out in the Rackspace booth, booth 108, so be sure to swing by there. We’ve got some cool games and giveaways. You won’t want to miss it. And as always, if you see me wandering around, don’t at all be afraid to come up and introduce yourself and say, “Hi.” I’m pretty friendly. Smile

Sunday March 2nd

Pre-Conference session – PRE009 - Installing and Configuring SharePoint 2013 (Room TBD)

7:15 PM – 7:30 PM – Just chatting about Workflow at the Nintex booth (Booth 635)

Tuesday, March 4th

10:45 AM - 12:00 PM  - SPC381 - Load testing SharePoint 2013 using Visual Studio 2013 (Bellini 2001-2106)

You’ve built your SharePoint 2013 farm and gotten it configured just how you want it. But how do you know if it can stand up to the load your users are going to throw at it? In this session we’ll show you how to use Visual Studio 2013 to load test your SharePoint farm. We’ll show you how to bring your farm to its knees to find out where your farm’s limitations are before your users do. Then we’ll show you what changes to make your farm scale higher and knee-buckle free.

Wednesday, March 5th

8:00 Netcast Hooligan Breakfast (Conference Breakfast)

We'll meet outside the breakfast hall around 8:00 and grab some breakfast together.

1:45 PM - 3:00 PM – SPC367 - Using Windows PowerShell with SharePoint 2013 and SharePoint Online (Titian 2201-2306)

Forget dogs, PowerShell is a SharePoint admin’s best friend. PowerShell lets us to do our everyday tasks faster and with less error. It also lets us do things we’d never dreamed of before. Get a brief overview of PowerShell, then dig in to some PowerShell scripts you can take home and use on your farm.

5:00 PM - 6:15 PM – SPC410 - The nuts and bolts of upgrading to SharePoint 2013  (Bellini 2001-2106)

Have you heard all your SharePoint Admin friends talk about how great SharePoint 2013 is, yet your farm is still running at SharePoint 2010, or even worse, SharePoint 2007? Then this session is for you. In this session Todd and Shane will go over the upgrade strategies to SharePoint 2013. Then they’ll dig into some fun stories about how they’ve done battle upgrading SharePoint so that you won’t have to. There will be lots of tips, and lots of fun, and in the end you’ll be ready for anything the upgrade to SharePoint 2013 can throw at you.

 

I’m also hoping to do a live recording of my Netcast there. When I get that timeslot I’ll update this post.

tk

ShortURL: http://www.toddklindt.com/SPC14Sched

  
No presence informationTodd O. Klindt2/23/2014 8:42 PMNetcast0 

In this nearly hour-long episode I'm all over the place. I start out talking about some plans for the upcoming SharePoint Conference. Then I talk about some SharePoint 2010 topics, like how to implement it in an extranet, and how to use it with SSL. Then I talk about a tool you can use to help improve the battery life of your tablet. I finish up with what is coming in the next version of Windows Phone. 
Audio File

Video File

image

YouTube (Subscribe)

Running Time: 54:34

Links:

2:56 - Pay Ustream $4 to get rid of ads
5:43 - SharePoint PowerHour
9:50 - Myspc is live
13:18 - Lumia 520 debacle
16:50 - Best practices for extranet environments (SharePoint Server 2010)
18:55 - Require SSL for Web application is not supported for SharePoint 2010
22:38 - Build 1005 vs 1001 version question
25:15 - OWA patch
27:26 - Getting the Product Version for SharePoint Online
29:22 - Autoruns for Windows
34:30 - New feature list for Windows Phone 8.1
41:49 - Play to DLNA
43:20 - Kickstarter hacked

UStream Premium Membership (no commercials during the live stream)
SharePoint 2013 Professional Administration

Brought to you by Rackspace

ShortURL: http://www.toddklindt.com/Netcast189

  
No presence informationTodd O. Klindt2/13/2014 10:06 PMNetcast0 

In tonight's Netcast I discuss how we now get to patch AppFabric. Weee!! We follow that up with a rousing discussion about the SharePoint Configuration Cache and all the fun things it does. While I love PowerShell to death, sometimes it needs a little extra work. We talk tonight about how you need to take an extra step if you create your site collections with it. I finish up with an inspirational blog post about being an imposter.

Audio File

Video File

image

YouTube (Subscribe)

Running Time: 45:30

Links:

6:25 - SharePoint Client Browser
9:40 - AppFabric (Distributed Cache) Can Be Patched on its on in SharePoint 2013
16:46 - Download Fiddler
21:10 - What is the SharePoint Configuration Cache?
27:00 - Creating a Site Collection in PowerShell does not create the default groups
30:30 - Latest SharePoint publications
31:54 - Latest Downloads from Microsoft
33:00 - Everyone Has Imposter Syndrome Except For You

UStream Premium Membership (no commercials during the live stream)
SharePoint 2013 Professional Administration

Brought to you by Rackspace

ShortURL: http://www.toddklindt.com/Netcast188

  
No presence informationTodd O. Klindt2/11/2014 9:18 PMSharePoint 20130 

Patching SharePoint is one of those things I enjoy. The excitement of unwrapping a brand new SharePoint patch is second only to getting a new tie or socks on Christmas morning. When I heard this news I just had to share it with you all. We get to patch AppFabric now! Hurray!

SharePoint 2013 introduced some new functionality, the Distributed Cache. Simply put, the Distributed Cache is a service that caches things like authentication tokens and social newsfeeds, stuff like that. The whole list is in this TechNet article. The process that does this is a product called AppFabric, and it’s installed and configured when you run the SharePoint 2013 Prereq installer. AppFabric is a standalone product, but it’s best to let SharePoint handle the installation and configuration. The Distributed Cache took a page out of the User Profile Service’s book. It can be very fussy when it’s angry.

When SharePoint 2013 first came out we were given strict instructions by Microsoft not to fool with the AppFabric pieces of the Distributed Cache. We might fancy ourselves AppFabric experts, but SharePoint wants it a very particular way, so we should use SharePoint tools to interact with that. That included patching. We were told even if an AppFabric patch knocked on our door and asked us nicely to install it, even if it used Sir or Ma’am, we were to say no. We were to let the SharePoint patches take care of patching AppFabric and the Distributed Cache.

Until now.

Recently Microsoft reversed its position on SharePoint administrators patching AppFabric. Not only are we now allowed to patch AppFabric, it’s actually recommended that we patch it to at least CU4. I haven’t installed this patch myself, but I’m sure it goes on smooth like butter. Smile

tk

http://www.toddklindt.com/PatchAppFabric

  
No presence informationTodd O. Klindt2/6/2014 9:23 PMNetcast0 

I lead off tonight's netcast with the stunning, sad, news that InfoPath is officially dead. After spending some time commiserating about its demise we move on to happier topics like a new update for Lumia 920 owners, and a way to get a free Lumia 520. Then I talk about the Dell Venue 8 Pro and traveling with it. I also talk about ways to get more battery life out of your Windows tablets. I end with talking about my amazing SharePoint Conference promotional videos. Oscar committee, are you listening?

Audio File

Video File

image

YouTube (Subscribe)

Running Time: 46:40

Links:

3:43 - InfoPath is dead
15:30 - Black update is out for Lumia 920 users
19:07 - Free Lumia 500 with Xbox Music Pass
23:30 - Living Small by Mike Ganotti
25:30 - Keyboard case
31:20 - Maximize Battery Life for Surface Pro
35:40 - Surface Pro - 128GB for $500
37:10 - Folders or Metadata
39:50 - SPC2014 Promotional videos

UStream Premium Membership (no commercials during the live stream)
SharePoint 2013 Professional Administration

Brought to you by Rackspace

ShortURL: http://www.toddklindt.com/Netcast187

  
No presence informationTodd O. Klindt2/4/2014 2:57 PM0 

I’m very fortunate that I’ve been asked to present a few sessions at SPC2014 next month. As part of the marketing effort for SPC Microsoft asked the speakers to create a quick video to promote each session and tell attendees what it’s about. They made the mistake of telling us to have fun. When Shane and I see that we’re supposed to have fun making a video we sort of lose track of what the real purpose of the video is. This is another case of that. Below are the three videos we made.

Part 1 – The Beginning

image
SPC #381 - Load Testing SharePoint with Visual Studio

Part 2 – The Sequel

image
SPC #410–The Nuts and Bolts of Upgrading to SharePoint 2013

Part 3 – The stunning conclusion

image
SPC #367 - Using Windows PowerShell with SharePoint 2013 and SharePoint Online

There you have it. Feel free to bookmark those, show them to your friends, Rickroll people with them, whatever. I hope to see you at SPC. Don’t forget to check all the videos at the SharePoint at Rackspace channel on YouTube. I promise every single one of them are better than these three.

tk

ShortURL: http://www.toddklindt.com/SPC14Videos

  
No presence informationTodd O. Klindt1/29/2014 10:30 PMNetcast0 

Tonight's netcast opens with an introduction to SkyDrive's new name, OneDrive. We talk about how that will impact SharePoint. Next I talk about a question I got on my web site about warm up scripts. Then I talk about a workaround for a bug with the Performance Point Designer. Then we start talking about my second love, PowerShell. I share a PowerShell script I use to tag my Netcast MP3 files. I follow that up with a blog post on exporting Search settings with PowerShell. I finish it up by talking about how to use PowerShell to copy list from one SharePoint web to another.

Audio File

Video File

YouTube (Subscribe)

Running Time: 42:51

Links:

5:10 - SkyDrive renamed to OneDrive

8:23 - Warm up scripts

11:08 - Trevor Seward's blog post on the ISS Warm up module

12:01 - Fix for KB2825647 released and verified

14:00 - Editing MP3 tags with PowerShell

24:25 - Changing the name of the Netcast

27:30 - PowerShell function to export mappings and crawled / managed properties

29:15 - Copy lists in PowerShell

UStream Premium Membership (no commercials during the live stream)
SharePoint 2013 Professional Administration

Brought to you by Rackspace

ShortURL: http://www.toddklindt.com/Netcast186

  
No presence informationTodd O. Klindt1/27/2014 7:37 PMNetcast0 

In tonight's episode I start out by showing how incredibly generous my Netcast listeners are. They raised a huge amount of money for one of my favorite charities. So I love on them for a while. Then I talk about what you can and cannot do to your SharePoint databases in SQL. Finally I talk about two non SharePoint topics. First I give a quick review of the Dell Venue 8 Pro 8" Windows tablet. Then I finish up talking about the Bose Quiet Comfort 20 headphones I recently bought.

Audio File

Video File

YouTube (Subscribe)

Running Time: 53:36

Links:

17:50 - Rack Gives Back

19:11 -  Support for changes to the databases that are used by Office server products and by Windows SharePoint Services

26:10 – Installing SQL for SharePoint – Part 1

26:13 – Configuring SQL for SharePoint – Part 2

27:00 - Disable MySites in SharePoint 2010

34:15 - Dell Venue 8 Pro

46:30 - Bose QC20 Headphones

UStream Premium Membership (no commercials during the live stream)
SharePoint 2013 Professional Administration

Brought to you by Rackspace

ShortURL: http://www.toddklindt.com/Netcast185

  
No presence informationTodd O. Klindt1/24/2014 2:11 PMPowerShell1 

As most of you know, I do a wildly successfully weekly SharePoint Netcast. Not only am I the star, I’m also the writer, director, producer, and janitor. As the years have gone by I’ve tried to improve the Netcast, but that almost always means I spend more time producing it. Because of that I’ve tried automate as much of the production as I can. One  piece of that is putting all the tags on the MP3 files. The program I use to produce my Netcast, Camtasia, is fantastic, absolutely fantastic. But it doesn’t tag the MP3 files it produces. Windows will let you manually tag the text fields of an MP3 file in Explorer, but you can’t add cover art that way. I’m way too pretty to not be on the cover art of my MP3. So I have had to import the MP3 into Windows Media Player and add the cover art that way. Awfully labor intensive. I’m way too lazy for all that. Time to bring out the big guns, PowerShell.

I spent some time trying to find a way to edit MP3 tags in PowerShell natively. I was surprised that I couldn’t find one. Fortunately PowerShell can wedge its way into all kinds of places. I was able to find a library, Taglib, that did the job. It allowed me to easily add both the text and picture information I needed. Here’s roughly the code I used to tag the MP3 for Netcast 185.

# Load the assembly. I used a relative path so I could off using the Resolve-Path cmdlet
[Reflection.Assembly]::LoadFrom( (Resolve-Path "..\Common\taglib-sharp.dll"))

# Load up the MP3 file. Again, I used a relative path, but an absolute path works too
$media = [TagLib.File]::Create((resolve-path ".\Netcast 185 - Growing Old with Todd.mp3"))

# set the tags
$media.Tag.Album = "Todd Klindt's SharePoint Netcast"
$media.Tag.Year = "2014"
$media.Tag.Title = "Netcast 185 - Growing Old with Todd"
$media.Tag.Track = "185"
$media.Tag.AlbumArtists = "Todd Klindt"
$media.Tag.Comment = "http://www.toddklindt.com/blog"

# Load up the picture and set it
$pic = [taglib.picture]::createfrompath("c:\Dropbox\Netcasts\Todd Netcast 1 - 480.jpg")
$media.Tag.Pictures = $pic

# Save the file back
$media.Save()

I’m only setting a few properties, but there are many more. To get the full list of properties you can get and set, issue this command:

$media.tag | Get-Member

Most, but not all, of the properties can be written to. Here are a couple of properties to compare:

Grouping                   Property   string Grouping {get;set;}
IsEmpty                    Property   bool IsEmpty {get;}

Properties with only a “get” in their definition, like “IsEmpty” are read-only. You can only get them. Properties that have both “get” and “set,” like “Grouping” are read and write. That’s not something that’s specific to taglib or MP3 files, that’s a PowerShell thing.

Once you’ve set whichever properties you want to set, use the .Save() method to write those changes back to your MP3 file. I’m using this weekly to tag a single file, but this could just as easily be used to bulk tag (or retag) MP3s, or move MP3s around based on information in their properties.

Enjoy. Leave a comment below if you use this in an interesting way.

tk

ShortURL: http://www.toddklindt.com/MP3TagswithPowerShell

  
No presence informationTodd O. Klindt1/23/2014 9:02 PMNetcast0 

In tonight's episode I discuss some decidedly non-technical things. I spent the first part of the show talking about my experience at the New Media Expo last week. I talk about a few things I learned there that I might just incorporate into this very netcast. Then I talk about some rebranding that will be going on. Then I sweeten the pot some to entice folks to donate to my birthday cause.

Audio File

Video File

YouTube (Subscribe)

Running Time: 48:02

Links:

01:41 – Laura’s Youtube channel

12:56 - Audacity

16:10 - Penn Gillette’s crowdsourced movie, Director’s Cut

20:04 - Scott Stratten’s website

20:04 – QR Codes Kill Kittens

UStream Premium Membership (no commercials during the live stream)
SharePoint 2013 Professional Administration

Brought to you by Rackspace

ShortURL: http://www.toddklindt.com/Netcast184

  
No presence informationTodd O. Klindt1/6/2014 4:55 PMSharePoint 2013; SQL1 

Hot on the heels of my award-winning, life-changing, awe-inspiring article, Set Up SQL Server 2012 as a SharePoint 2013 Database Server, comes parts 2 and 3 at SharePoint Pro Mag. If there was a story that demanded a sequel, this is it. Now, if you haven’t read part 1 yet, go ahead and get caught up. You don’t want to start in the middle of the story. You need to know who the characters are, and what our protagonist's motivations are, what the exotic locations are, what is the McGuffin, etc. The story in part 2 picks up right where part 1 ends, so you’ll need to be up to speed.

Here are the sequels and their links:

Part 2: Configure SQL Server 2012 for SharePoint 2013

Part 3: Fine-Tune Your SQL Server 2012 Configuration for SharePoint 2013

Please do tweet, share, link, and tattoo the link so the nice folks at SharePointProMag will let me write more articles for them. It’ll take more than just my mom making one of those articles her homepage for them to keep asking me to come back.

And if you have any questions, comments, or are just lonely, leave a comment on the article, or here on this blog post.

Thanks,

tk

ShortURL: http://www.toddklindt.com/SetUpSQL2013Pt2

1 - 100Next