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No presence informationTodd O. Klindt10/23/2014 10:29 AMNetcast0 

Tonight's episode begins with me apologizing to mules. Yes, mules. Then I talk about why every web app deserves a site collection in its root, and why you want one there whether you want one there or not. Then I talk about some ways to measure the performance of your hardware, and how to scale your SharePoint farm to match your needs. I wrap the show up by talking about the latest gadget I've purchased, and how Windows 8.1 and 10 run happily on 7 year old hardware.
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Netcast 219 - The Fairest Equine (Time 0_01_07;10)

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Running Time: 41:03

Links:

06:53 - Microsoft Ignite Conference
10:00 - October CU for SharePoint 2013
13:40 - SharePoint 2013 Builds page
16:34 - "Send to Other location" fails when a web application has no root site
18:10 - storage performance & measuring IOPs
22:45 - Performance and capacity test results and recommendations (SharePoint Server 2013)
25:30 - Windows 8 tablet for $99
37:45 - SharePoint & Office 365 Podcast Report

SharePoint 2013 Professional Administration

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ShortURL: http://www.toddklindt.com/Netcast219

  
No presence informationTodd O. Klindt10/17/2014 5:12 PMNetcast0 

In this episode we talk a lot about the last episode. It was the first one done with Google Hangouts. We spent some time talking about what worked and what didn't work. Then we talk about all the bad things that can happen if you have your SharePoint Servers automatically install Windows Updates. On the topic of patches we talk about the process SharePoint goes through when you install a patch. I finish up the netcast talking about DLNA, DIAL, and Miracast.
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Netcast 218 - Dongles and Vaseline (Time 0_01_19;08)

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Running Time: 35:03

Links:

06:45 - Don’t Enable Automatic Updates on SharePoint Servers
21:59 - Plex Media Server
22:58 - Google Chromecast
29:27 - Netgear PTV3000
28:49 - Microsoft HD-10

SharePoint 2013 Professional Administration

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ShortURL: http://www.toddklindt.com/Netcast218

  
No presence informationTodd O. Klindt10/9/2014 10:55 PMSharePoint 2010; SharePoint 2013; PowerShell8 

I had an incident a couple of weeks ago that I thought I’d share with all of you. I had a beautiful four server SharePoint 2013 farm. It was humming along, serving up SharePoint pages with the best of them. Then Patch Tuesday hit last month. One of the four servers was set to automatically install Windows Updates, and it did. It installed the crap out of them. Normally that’s not a good thing, but it’s also not a horrible thing. In the past that’s bitten us SharePoint admins because things like .NET patches, or random reboots in the middle of the night. Inconvenient, for sure, but not the end of the world. The September 2014 Patch Tuesday rotation had another trick up its sleeve. It looked like this:

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Picture courtesy of John White (blog | Twitter)

Those sneaky devils snuck a SharePoint patch in the Windows Updates. Installing a patch on just one server of course causes all kinds of havoc. Since I thought all the servers were set to only download it was doubly confusing as to why SharePoint was now all in a snit about needing an upgrade. I got it all taken care of, but that’s food for another blog post.

My recommendation is to NOT enable installing Windows Updates automatically. I recommend having Windows download the patches, then installing them manually. You can change that setting in Control Panel > System and Security > Turn automatic updating on or off. You can also Win + R and run wuapp. It looks like this:

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You can also set it using PowerShell with this little beauty:

Set-ItemProperty 'HKLM:\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\Windows\CurrentVersion\WindowsUpdate\Auto Update' -Name AUOptions -Value "3"

That might be showing off a little, but using PowerShell is just cool. You can look in this White Paper to see all the different Windows Updates settings and their values.

However, that does not mean you shouldn’t patch your servers. The OS still needs to be patched. You can install them manually, but that sounds like a lot of work. An even better idea would be to install a WSUS Server and push your patches out that way.

Happy patching,
tk

ShortURL: http://www.toddklindt.com/DontAutoUpdate

  
No presence informationTodd O. Klindt10/7/2014 9:39 PMNetcast0 

Tonight's episode is a recap of all the things I've been doing for the last few weeks on the road. I talk about SPTechCon  and being on a panel for the Microsoft Cloud Show. Then I explain what I was doing in Chicago two weeks ago, and tell you all about the Big Microsoft Conference that's going to be held in Chicago in May of 2015. Then I talk about some fun I had in Stockholm last week. I wrap the show up with some technical topics. I talk about the Windows 10 Preview and the Remote Server Administration Tools. Then I talk a little PowerShell and why it's bad to let your SharePoint servers automatically update. 
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Netcast 217 - Ball Bearings, Plastics, and PowerShell (Time 0_28_33;07)

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Running Time: 36:30

Links:

08:53 - My Interview on Microsoft Cloud Show
11:51 - Microsoft Cloud Show on Twitter
12:00 - Office365 or SharePoint On-Prem panel at SPTechCon
13:00 - Big Microsoft Conference Roundtable
26:37 - Download Windows 10 Client Preview
29:53 - Remote Server Administration Tools for Windows 10 Technical Preview
30:36 - Change PowerShell Get-Help to Display Examples
31:57 - The Altaro PowerShell Hyper-V Cookbook

SharePoint 2013 Professional Administration

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ShortURL: http://www.toddklindt.com/Netcast217

  
No presence informationTodd O. Klindt10/6/2014 9:57 AMNetcast0 

Shane takes the helm for the second week in a row in tonight's episode. He brings in some help this time. First he talks about joining a new social site, Ello. Then he discusses taking Microsoft certs in your pajamas, and different docking station options for your Surface Pro. Then Jonathan bores us with what it's like to be a developer. He finishes up with how to make projects succeed, and why you should worry about Marketing, even if you're not in Marketing.

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Netcast 216 - The Al Gore of Scrum (Time 0_01_07;18)

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Running Time: 47:52

Links:

04:20 – Shane Joined Ello
15:50 - MS Cert exams from home
17:50 - Debate about docking stations for Surface Pro
24:00 – JPM’s SharePoint game
31:07 - JPM’s Twitter ID
42:00 - Offering you more culture and diversity this week

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ShortURL: http://www.toddklindt.com/Netcast216

  
No presence informationTodd O. Klindt9/28/2014 12:37 AM4 

Last July, when Julia White posted her blog post on the Office blog, Microsoft’s unified technology event for enterprises, she broke a few hearts. If you didn’t read it, or have blocked it out, allow me to sum it up. She announced that all the big Microsoft Enterprise tech conferences, TechEd, SharePoint Conference, Project Conference, Exchange Conference, Lync Conference, and Todd’s SharePointorama (okay, I made that last one up) were being combined into one, big, huge conference in Chicago May 4-8, 2015. Those other conferences have sung their swan songs. As someone that has been a speaker at three of those shows (not counting Todd’s SharePointorama) I was a little concerned. Not quite ready to hang up my Microsoft slippers, but I was concerned.

Over the last nine years I’ve been very fortunate to be involved with many Microsoft conferences as a speaker. It’s been a great opportunity and has opened a lot of doors and I’ve met a bunch of great people. I’m kind of a nerd, and with as many conferences as I’ve been involved with (Microsoft and others) I’ve always wondered how the sausage was made. How did the organizer choose the venue? The rooms? How are they able to make sure every little morsel of flavor is cooked out of the chicken they serve for lunch? Does that cost extra? I’ve buddied up with some of the organizers and gotten some of those answers (it doesn’t cost extra) but I was still curious.

A month or so ago a unique opportunity was dropped into my lap. Last year Microsoft started a Roundtable discussion about TechEd. They invited a few folks from different product disciplines, different areas of interest, and different communities to provide Microsoft input on TechEd. They were doing the same thing for the Big Microsoft Conference and they invited me join them. Woo Hoo!

Last Monday and Tuesday I was in Chicago with 17 or so of my closest nerd friends, and another 20 or so Microsoft folks. Our mission was to tour the location of the Big Microsoft Conference, McCormick Place, and let Microsoft know what our opinion on was on a bunch of issues. It was a great time. First, a few pictures. Here is a quick shot I took of the main entrance along with some of my fellow Roundtablers:

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The size of this place is immense. The exhibit halls alone are 2.6 million square feet, with one over 800k square feet.

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This is the South exhibit hall. Not only is it large enough for all the IT Vendors, and the pallets and pallets of free t-shirts and 2 GB USB drives they’ll be giving away, if you look closely you’ll see it has an island in the middle. This island has some meeting space, some possible food vending spots, and most importantly, bathrooms! My biggest problem with large exhibit halls is that the potties are only on the outside walls, and sometimes those walls are a very long ways away. My bladder does not approve of that.

Here’s one of the smaller exhibit halls with a plumbers convention going on. I’m not sure why, but that cracks me up. Smile

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The views from the Lakeside Center were beautiful. The organizers haven’t decided yet where stuff will go, but I hope I get some sessions over there.

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I talked to the McCormick IT guys and they assured me we’d have more than enough bandwidth to get out to the cloud for our demos and still be able to satisfy our constant cravings for cat videos. It’s a tall order, but they are confident they are up to it.

For the rest of the first day, and the second day we talked about The Big Conference itself. How the sessions will be decided on, keynotes, entertainment, etc. I let them know I was available for the keynote. We’ll see what happens. I was initially concerned about how Microsoft was going to bring all of these conferences together without killing the things that made them great. The Big Conference will probably have 20,000 people as opposed to the 10k or so at TechEd or the SharePoint Conference. It’s tough to manage that many people, especially such tight groups. And where will they all stay? How will they all get there and back? Will there be enough ice cream at break time?? After hearing what the Microsoft organizers had to say, I think they’ve got a good handle on it.

It was very clear that they know the networking and community aspects of these tech conferences are very, very important. We tech nerds aren’t always the most socially outgoing and they don’t want to lose the ability for people to find each other, or for people that already know each other to stay together. They also know that with the increase in the number of sessions and attendees they’re going to have to make sure things are discoverable. I suggested using <blink> tags for all of my sessions. I’m not sure anyone wrote that idea down.

It feels like the organizers of the Big Microsoft Conference have thought this through really well. They spent a lot of time letting us talk and really listening to what we had to say. TechEd and the SharePoint Conference were very important to me, and I’ll miss them both dearly. But I feel like their legacies are in good hands. I’m looking forward to the Big Microsoft Conference in May. I’ll post more about the conference here as more details emerge.

SavetheDate_Twitter

tk

ShortURL: http://www.toddklindt.com/MSBigConf

  
No presence informationTodd O. Klindt9/26/2014 4:13 PMNetcast0 

Another week with Shane at the helm of the Netcast. It's a wonder you guys still tune in. Shane talks about SPTechCon and how great it was presenting with me. I really do make him look good. He talks about getting Office to students and some commercials he likes. Then he talks about an interesting article about Olive Garden and designing products.
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Running Time: 55:04

Links:

01:00 - http://www.rackspace.com/microsoft
02:55 - Microsoft made it easier for students to get Office for free if their school has subscribed to O365
10:35 - Video of PowerShell for fun and profit
10:43 - Video of Upgrading from SharePoint 2010 to 2013
15:50 - Business Insider article on Olive Garden
21:58 - Customers Don’t Know What They Want—Until They See It

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ShortURL: http://www.toddklindt.com/Netcast215

  
No presence informationTodd O. Klindt9/23/2014 10:25 AMNetcast0 

This episode was recorded at SPTechCon and the sound isn't very good. :( Sorry about that. Shane and I talk about SQL and Windows patching. Then we move on to Windows Phone and Minecraft. The whole time Shane treats me with disrespect. No one likes Shane.

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Running Time: 55:04

Links:

01:42 – Production Notes
11:53 - Install-SPService saves the day
23:09 - SQL 2014 support added in April 2014 CU
23:50 - September 2014 Cus released
32:50 – Windows Phone is cool
45:07 - Microsoft buys Minecraft

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ShortURL: http://www.toddklindt.com/Netcast214

  
No presence informationTodd O. Klindt9/12/2014 11:07 AMNetcast0 

Tonight's Netcast has all kinds of fun stuff, and oddly no SharePoint. I talk the new Cyan patch for Windows Phone and all the fun I had getting it installed. Then I talk about OneDrive and Dropbox and why I keep playing for Dropbox. Then I giddily talk about the PowerShell v3 Preview and I gush over a couple of my favorite new features. I wrap things up talking about some cool new Windows 8.1 hardware that will be coming out soon.

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Running Time: 50:13

Links:

08:00 - Cyan is out for Lumia 920 on AT&T
11:31 - Download the Nokia Recovery Tool
12:00 - Nokia Cyan rollout list
16:40 - OneDrive is Great! Then Why Do I Pay for Dropbox?
22:28 - And Microsoft responds!
23:01 - The OneDrive Blog
25:10 - PowerShell 5.0 September 2014 preview
30:45 - ZOTAC shrinks the PC with ZBOX PI320 pico
34:45 - $120 Windows Tablet from Toshiba
35:00 -  HDHomeRun

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SharePoint 2013 Professional Administration

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ShortURL: http://www.toddklindt.com/Netcast213

  
No presence informationTodd O. Klindt9/10/2014 10:59 AMSharepoint; SharePoint 20130 

It’s hard to believe, but we’re only a few days away from SPTechCon in Boston. As I’m making my lists and checking them twice I thought I’d put all of my events in one convenient location. That way folks that are attending SPTechCon will more easily be able to avoid me. Smile

Monday, September 15th

Live Netcast Recording – 9:00 PM-ish Location: It’s currently a secret

Shane and I will be doing a live recording and stream of my SharePoint netcast. If you’ve ever wanted to heckle in person, here’s your big chance. You’ll have to bring your own tomatoes, we will not be providing them.

Tuesday, September 16th

Upgrading from SharePoint 2010 to 2013 – 9:00am – 12:15pm

Everyone is doing it, so what are you waiting for? The best answer would be that you are waiting to learn all of the fun that goes into an upgrade. Well, if that is the case, then wait no longer. Come to this class to learn about all things upgrade. Topics to be covered are the options you have to upgrade, planning for the process, and looking at the tools Microsoft includes with SharePoint to help along the way.

The good news is this time around there is only one upgrade option to show you for getting the database upgraded, but when it comes to upgrading the UI, it is a brave new world. Visual upgrade is gone and now you have 2010 versus 2013 site collections running in the same 2013 farm. And the transition from a 2010 site collection is now self-service for the site collection administrator--crazy! Come hang out with us as we explore this together.

Office 365 vs. On-Premise Panel – 5:30pm – 6:30pm

Andrew Connell is hosting a panel with some of the brightest minds in the SharePoint world to discuss what the future of SharePoint in the cloud and on-premises is. They decided it would be fun to invite me to have someone to make fun of. Join us and let us know what you think, of both SharePoint and them making fun of me.

Wednesday, September 17th

Introduction to Windows PowerShell for SharePoint Administrators – 11:00am – 12:15pm

Do you plan on working on Microsoft products for the next five years? Do you only know enough about PowerShell to spell it correctly? If you answered yes, then this is the class for you. PowerShell is the present and future tool that is the cornerstone of administering Microsoft products like SharePoint, and if you don't know it, then you are working too hard. Come to this class to learn the key fundamentals of PowerShell, and how to use those skills to solve every problem you have ever had. That's right! If you have a flat tire, PowerShell can even fix that.

SharePoint 2013 Administrator Skills – 3:45pm – 5:00pm

In this class, we will go over the different admin topics that are new for 2013. Some experience with 2010 is assumed, so the class can focus on topics new to 2013. Some of the high points will be an overview of how Office Web Apps have changed your farm topology; the move to loving Claims authentication; and why all the talk about host name site collections. For certain, PowerShell will sneak in not because it is new, but because it is that important.

Lightning Talks – 5:15pm – 6:30pm

Watch vendors try to hawk their wares without it looking like they’re trying to hawk their wares. Also see Shane and I try to be funny, even though we’re not.

I’ll also just be wandering the halls chatting with folks. If you see me, be sure to come up and introduce yourself and say “Hi!” and maybe take a minute or two to explain why you like me better than Shane. Rackspace will also have a booth, so I’ll be hanging out there, too.

See you next week.

tk

ShortURL: http://www.toddklindt/SPTechConBoston2014

  
No presence informationTodd O. Klindt9/7/2014 9:44 PMPowerShell0 

It’s been a busy summer and I’m just getting around to installing the PowerShell v5 Preview. And it’s a good one. It’s officially called the “Windows Management Framework 5.0 Preview September 2014” but it’s all PowerShell. It will install on Windows Server 2012 R2 and Windows 8.1, both 32 and 64 bit varieties. This is a Preview, a beta, so don’t install it on a Production machine. Don’t test in Production. But if you have a test machine, go ahead and install this and take it for a spin. You’ll be glad you did.

There are a ton of great new features in PowerShell v5. Several blog posts worth. Too many for me to list here, though they are all listed in the 59 page Word doc that comes with the download. I will, however, tease you with two of my favorites.

Transcript works in the Integrated Scripting Environment (ISE) Huzzah!

This has been my main disappointment in PowerShell for a couple of versions. I teach PowerShell classes and write blog posts on PowerShell, and am generally a PowerShell doodler. The Transcript is invaluable in all of those situations. And while the first generation of the ISE was nothing to write home about, it’s gotten pretty impressive lately. I’ve wanted to take advantage of it, but it didn’t work with the Transcript. <sad panda> In the past I’ve had to choose between my old, faithful functionality, the Transcript, and the new hotness, the ISE. Conflicts aplenty. Well, no more.

The ISE now supports the Transcript. No more choosing. I get my cake and I get to eat it!

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Now I have no more excuses, the ISE will be my PowerShell interface of choice.

PowerShell natively zips and unzips files

This is another one of those, “What do you mean PowerShell doesn’t…” situations I keep having with PowerShell. It seemed amazing to me that there wasn’t easy native support for zipping and unzipping files in PowerShell. I’ve spent hours looking for it. Now in v5 it’s finally here. Two new cmdlets, Compress-Archive and Expand-Archive handle the zipping and unzipping respectively. As of the writing of this article, there aren’t any –examples in the help documentation, but I expect after a few Update-Help executions some will show up. Here’s an example to get you started:

Compress-Archive power*.txt -DestinationPath .\gold.zip -CompressionLevel Optimal

Running that in the folder that has all your PowerShell Transcript files into a single file, gold.zip. To keep it updated, run the same command with the optional –Update parameter.

There you go, two excellent reasons to install the PowerShell v5 Preview on your favorite test box.

tk

ShortURL: http://www.toddklindt.com/PowerShellv5Preview

  
No presence informationTodd O. Klindt8/30/2014 10:53 PMTech Stuff0 

This was written in August of 2014. As technology marches forward, the prices and features of the products mentioned have probably gotten cheaper, bigger, faster, stronger, and better smelling. If you’re from the future and reading this, keep that in mind.

Last week Dropbox announced they were upgrading their $100 a year ($9 a month) Pro plan from 100 GB of storage to a massive 1 TB. (insert picture of Dr. Evil with his pinky to his mouth here). Because of that announcement Dropbox has been all over the tech news. In Windows Weekly #377 my friend Paul Thurrott comments that $99 a year is as much as a license for Office 365 Home, which gives you email, Office Web Apps, and 1 TB of OneDrive For Business (ODFB) for 5 people (5 TB total) . He wondered why anyone would pay the same amount for just storage, and 1/5 of the storage at that. I hope to provide a satisfactory answer to that question with this blog post.

I’ve been paying for Dropbox Pro for a couple of years and it’s worth every penny to me. This is the case even though I get a free Office 365 subscription because I’m an MVP. While I do use a bunch of the functionality of OneDrive and OneDrive for Business, there are a few things that Dropbox does so much better that it’s worth giving up a couple of of venti hot chocolates a month at Starbuck’s to pay for Dropbox Pro. Here is my list of why I pay for Dropbox Pro even though I get OneDrive and Office 365 for free.

File size limitation of 2 GB in OneDrive (250 MB in ODFB) , Infinity +1 in Dropbox

I store a lot of different types of files in Dropbox. Like most folks I store pictures up there and a few documents. But I also store all the videos from my Netcast there. I store a bunch of commonly used software installations up there as well. I have the database backups from my blog syncing to a machine at home through Dropbox. I’ve even been known to store a virtual machine or two in Dropbox. Using the desktop sync client, any file I copy into a Dropbox folder will show up on all the other machines syncing that same folder. When I first tried to move over to OneDrive that didn’t work. OneDrive has a hard file size limit of 2 GB. ODFB has a similar limit of 2 GB. Dropbox’s limit is infinity. If you have space in your Dropbox quota, the file will sync. 2 GB might be more than enough for most people, but I regularly deal with larger files so it’s a big deal for me.

Shared folders in OneDrive or ODFB don’t sync to the file system. Dropbox is happy to

Despite the fact that I’m an only child, I share pretty well, regardless of what my wife might say. With OneDrive or ODFB if I share a folder with someone it does not sync to their local hard drives, even if they have the desktop sync clients installed. Even if they ask nicely. That means if I share a folder with someone they have to go to OneDrive (or ODFB) with a browser, or the Metro OneDrive app to download the files I’ve shared with them. For some situations, this might not be a big deal, but it’s come up a few times for me. For instance, I have a shared Dropbox folder with my parents where I copy pictures of my cats and any of my artwork that’s refrigerator worthy. My parents have that same folder set up as a location for a slideshow screensaver. So as I proudly drop pictures into that folder on my computer, they magically sync to my mom’s hard drive and show up in her screensaver. She doesn’t have to remember to check for them, they’re just there.

Files don’t just have a URL in OneDrive or ODFB, you have to download them from a web page

If I share an individual file with someone in OneDrive, the link I send them takes them to a web page that hosts the file. It doesn’t take them to the actual file itself. Again, it’s not a huge deal, but it’s more work that they have to go through than if I share the same file the same way with Dropbox. If I send someone a link to a Word doc shared from Dropbox, the URL goes to that exact file. They could download it with PowerShell if they wanted to. With OneDrive and ODFB it’s a whole big affair.

OneDrive For Business alters Office files, Dropbox keeps its dirty mitts off of them

It recently came out that files stored in ODFB are actually altered when they’re uploaded. On the backend, ODFB is a SharePoint document library. When an Office document is uploaded to SharePoint it puts a unique tag in it so it can keep it straight from other copies of that file, or other versions of it. I understand why they do it, but it doesn’t seem necessary for non work files. Dropbox doesn’t change the files. I like that better.

While a few of these issues are pretty small potatoes, a couple of them (file size and local syncing) are show stoppers for me. As one as OneDrive or ODFB doesn’t support them, I’ll continue to happily pay for Dropbox.

tk

ShortURL: http://www.toddklindt.com/whydropbox

  
No presence informationTodd O. Klindt8/29/2014 11:14 AMNetcast0 

I start out this week's Netcast talking about the ALS Ice Bucket challenge and how I partook in it and you can help me out with my next charity drive. Then I dig into fun tech stuff. I talk about why you should have as few app pools as possible in SharePoint. Then I sing the praises of the new and improved ULS Viewer. Then I help demystify patching and when you can expect the Cyan update on your Nokia Lumia phone.
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Netcast 212 - Mules Powered SharePoint (Time 0_03_47;16)

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Running Time: 47:09

Links:

05:00 - ALS Ice Bucket challenge video
10:01 - Birthday drive
11:52 - The Expense of Application Pools
21:07 - http://spbestwarmup.codeplex.com
22:10 - ULS Viewer is Back From the Dead!ULS Viewer is Back From the Dead!
29:27 - http://spinsiders.com/brianlala/2014/08/25/pre-populating-sharepoint-farm-details-for-ulsviewer/
30:11 - Stefan Gossner's blog post on the August 2014 CUs
39:03 - Nokia Cyan rollout list
42:42 – Shameless self Promotion

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ShortURL: http://www.toddklindt.com/Netcast212

  
No presence informationTodd O. Klindt8/22/2014 10:34 PMSharePoint 2010; SharePoint 20139 

It was a sad day when the original MSDN ULS Viewer was discontinued. There was much weeping at the Klindt household when the news broke. Fortunately I found a backup copy. I put it on a USB stick and buried it in my backyard for safe keeping, next to the coffee can with my Honus Wagner baseball card in it. I also put a copy in The Cloud, whatever that is. There was still an open spot in my heart though. Smile

Then today I was putzing around the Internet, looking for some cat videos and discount pharmaceuticals when I saw one of the happiest headlines I’ve ever seen on the Internet, “ULS Viewing Like a Boss (ULS Viewer is now available)

First, I was in denial. I wouldn’t let myself believe it. I was worried it was an old blog post bubbling up some how. Then I was worried that maybe it was just a mean joke from Bill. He’s like that, you know. But I clicked it, then I clicked the Download Link, then I downloaded it, and it actually worked! Hallelujah!

So run, don’t walk, to your nearest web browser and go Bill Baer’s blog post and download the new and improved ULS Viewer. It has some bug fixes and it  has some new features, like some fancy command line parameters, and easier support for monitoring multiple servers. All the while maintaining the same charm and panache as the original version.

This time around the ULS Viewer looks a little more legit, so hopefully we don’t have to worry about it disappearing in the middle of the night like a deadbeat relative that owes you money, like it did last time. If you’re smart though, you’ll bury it in your backyard like I did.

tk

ShortURL: http://www.toddklindt.com/ulsviewer

  
No presence informationTodd O. Klindt8/22/2014 9:17 PMNetcast0 

Another Netcast, another video failure. *sigh* When my video recording software wasn't crashing I talked about why I was gone last week. I also talk about some cool Windows Phone stuff coming down the pike, and how patching both SharePoint and Windows has gotten really complicated in the last month. Then I talk about hacking Shane's car. Please don't tell him.
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Running Time: 49:31

Links:

  1. 08:00 - Guitar camp
  2. 16:25 - Offline maps with Here Maps
  3. 18:21 - Windows Phone update
  4. 24:51 - August 2014 CUs are out for SharePoint
  5. 31:52 - August Windows 8.1 yanked
  6. 33:00 - Community-supplied Fix for August Blue Screens
  7. 35:31 - Windows Threshold technical preview expected late September
  8. 36:50 - OBD Auto Doctor is a must-have Windows Phone app for any DIY auto enthusiast
  9. 38:15 - ODB Reader
  10. 40:25 – Shameless Self-Promotion

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ShortURL: http://www.toddklindt.com/Netcast211

  
No presence informationTodd O. Klindt8/18/2014 5:32 PMNetcast0 

Once again, Shane steals my show away from me and the wheels fall right off. He talks about his tablet and his phone and boring stuff like patches and encryption. Then he chats about how cool Internet Explorer is and how to hack his car. He also breaks the news to us that to use Internet services it takes Internet bandwidth.

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Running Time: 28:09

Links:

04:05 - Shane's Surface Pro 3 is fancy and cool
09:31 - I want Nokia Cyan to come out for my 1020
10:43 - Microsoft is the leader in Gartners Magic Quadrant for Unified communications
11:54 - Running your public website on SharePoint? Time to consider encryption
13:51 - Update to Windows 8.1 tomorrow as part of patch Tuesday
15:50 - Only a year half more of a million versions of IE
17:20 - Couple this with last week's change in behavior around out-of-date Active X controllers being blocked
20:35 - Plan for Internet bandwidth usage for Office 365
22:32 - OBD Auto Doctor is a must-have Windows Phone app for any DIY auto enthusiast
24:46 – Shameless Todd-Promotion
26:38 - SharePoint Power Hour

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No presence informationTodd O. Klindt8/11/2014 12:16 PMNetcast0 

Tonight's Netcast is all over the board, in a good way. I start off giving my opinions on luck vs. hard work with a funny video I saw on the Internet. Then I follow up with some more technical, but less entertaining talk about URL rewriting and SharePoint Search performance. I follow it up by showing off what's new in the Windows Phone 8.1 Update 1. Overall, not the worst work I've done.

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Running Time: 40:58

Links:

03:47 - Luck vs. Hard work video
07:58 - 10 URL Rewriting Tips and Tricks (URL at 11:41)
10:44 - Using 301 Redirect URL Rewrite module to Redirect SharePoint urls
27:32 - Removing unwanted user related search results for SharePoint 2013 websites
30:38 - Update for Windows Phone 8.1 is rolling out

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No presence informationTodd O. Klindt8/3/2014 10:26 PMNetcast2 

After my very successful tour of the Southern Hemisphere I get back in my squeaky chair and record another Netcast. I start out by regaling everyone with the tales of my trip including some Netcast viewers that I got to meet. Then I talk about how CUs come out once a month and how that's a good thing. Next I talk about when a SQL Service Pack isn't really a Service Pack. Then I breeze through some other topics like a Windows Phone update, a FitBit app for Windows Phone, how to share tabs between devices, and how to use PowerShell with SharePoint even if you're not on the SharePoint server.

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Running Time: 39:08

Links:

20:27 - Double Your Cumulative Update Fun, SharePoint CUs Are Now Monthly!
24:14 - Problems installing SQL Server 2012 R2 SP2
30:45 - Project Siena
33:58 - Windows phone Live Lock screen app
35:52 - Official Fitbit app for Windows Phone 8

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No presence informationTodd O. Klindt7/31/2014 5:03 PMNetcast0 

Shane takes over the Netcast again in my absence. He rambles on and on about how great I am and how much he respects and adores me. Then he talks about all the fun he had at WPC and how it's just not as much fun without me there. And speaking of conferences Shane talks about how Microsoft is consolidating all their IT Pro conferences into one big conference next year. Finally he talks about some new Cloud offerings from Microsoft and just what "Cloud" means. While it's not as good as a Netcast from me, it's better than no Netcast at all.

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Running Time: 20:36

Links:

07:04 - Microsoft Unified Commercial Conference

08:40 - Thanks to John Engates

10:16 - Post from Bill Baer

10:20 - Azure Preview Portal - Set up SharePoint 2013 HA Farm:

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No presence informationTodd O. Klindt7/11/2014 10:16 AMPowerShell0 

While SharePoint is my main love, recently I’ve been dabbling in virtualization and making clouds. You can’t work at a big hosting company like Rackspace without getting a little cloud-curious and I was no exception. For the last year or so in my spare time I’ve been playing with setting up clouds, managing clouds, automating clouds, etc. My cloud weapon of choice has been the combination of Hyper-V, System Center, and the Windows Azure Pack (WAP). Having worked with Microsoft products for the last 20 years, it was an easy fit. Being the incredibly efficient (some call it “lazy,” I just don’t see that) guy that I am, the PowerShell integration has been one of my favorite parts. Especially once you see what it takes to get all of System Center and WAP installed and configured. It makes installing a SharePoint farm look like a carriage ride through a park.

Since I’m a little late to the game, smarter people than me have already seen this gap and filled it. Specifically Rob Willis at Microsoft wrote a tool called the PowerShell Deployment Toolkit (PDT) to automate all of this. It’s flat out amazing. For the last year or so I’ve been playing with the PDT and I’m constantly impressed by it.

Recently, one of my coworkers, Andre Stephens, and I wrote a short write-up about how we’re using the PDT to install large System Center deployments at Rackspace. You can read Provisioning a Microsoft Private Cloud with PDT at the Rackspace Developer blog.

You’ll probably be seeing a lot more posts from me about this kind of stuff. It’s been a lot of fun and I just can’t help myself sharing when I play with cool technology.

tk

ShortURL: http://www.toddklindt.com/UsePDT

  
No presence informationTodd O. Klindt7/10/2014 8:20 AMSharePoint 2010; SharePoint 20134 

If you’re like me, you look forward to all the even numbered months. Not just because of Valentine’s Day and my dad’s birthday, but because that’s when our beloved SharePoint gets its new Cumulative Updates. The odd numbered months just don’t feel like as much fun in comparison. I felt bad for them.

Until today… (well, yesterday)

I was surprised two days ago when SharePoint 2013 got a July CU. July? That’s an odd month, this makes no sense! This changes everything. Is water still wet? Is the sky still blue? I can’t keep up!

Yesterday Microsoft announced that SharePoint on-premises, both 2010 and 2013, will start getting monthly CUs. That’s going to be a lot to keep track of, but I think I’m up to it. I will still maintain my SharePoint 2010 Builds page and my SharePoint 2013 Builds page. My guidance on CUs hasn’t changed. You shouldn’t install a CU unless it contains a fix that you need. And if you talk yourself into installing a CU, install it in a test environment first to see if it breaks anything. I maintain a wiki with a page for every patch. As soon as I know about a problem with a patch I’ll record it there. If you do find a problem with a patch, let me know and I’ll add it.

At first blush, I think this is a good thing. Like SharePoint Online, Microsoft seems committed to updating SharePoint on-prem at a rapid pace. The good news with on-prem SharePoint is that we get to choose whether the patches get installed or not. Seems like the best of both worlds to me.

tk

ShortURL: http://www.toddklindt.com/CUsRMonthly

  
No presence informationTodd O. Klindt7/9/2014 9:13 PMNetcast2 

In tonight's Netcast we cover more Service Pack 1 shenanigans and I talk about how you can keep up to date with the changes I make to my patch pages. We also talk about using PowerShell with SharePoint Online, and how you can get your digital library chock full of meaty Microsoft books without breaking any state or federal laws.

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Running Time: 38:01

Links:

05:23 - MVP Award
08:40 - TechSmith
09:54 - VMWare
14:41 - How to tell which Service Pack 1 you have installed on SharePoint 2013
23:39 - Find out when my web pages change
25:22 - http://www.changedetection.com
27:37 - http://media.toddklindt.com/Netcast
28:42 - SharePoint Online PowerShell
33:00 - Largest collection of FREE Microsoft eBooks ever

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No presence informationTodd O. Klindt7/3/2014 9:42 AMNetcast0 

It's good to be back in the studio. This week's Netcast starts fast and keeps up that pace. I talk about the ShareThePoint Conference I'll be attending in Australia and New Zealand, and how some lucky listener can win a free pass. Then I cover a Distributed Cache problem I read about, and also how the April 2014 CU for SharePoint 2013 fixes an annoying bug where SharePoint ignores custom error pages. Then I talk about SQL a little bit. I link to a script you can use to generate some tables, and I talk about why you would install SQL Management Studio on your SharePoint server. I finish up with an Office365 authentication post, why Firefox hates SharePoint, and why you shouldn't use a dollar sign in an account name. My last story is about a Kickstarter project for a dock for the Dell Venue 8 Pro.

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Running Time: 50:29

Links:

08:04 - Win a free pass to ShareThePoint Conference
16:23 - Exception 'Microsoft.ApplicationServer.Caching.DataCacheException: ErrorCode<ERRCA0017>:
19:46 - SharePoint 2013 is not using my Custom Error Page
21:54 - SharePoint 2013 Build Numbers
23:32 - https://twitter.com/sp2013Patches
24:00 - Put SQL Management Studio on SharePoint box (from Netcast 77)
28:20 - Simple SQL Server script to create a database and generate activity for a demo
29:55 - Firefox 30 breaks SharePoint on non-Windows machines
34:00 - Choosing a sign-in model for Office 365
35:55 - Do not use service account names that contain the symbol $
36:35 - Service Account Suggestions for SharePoint 2013
37:55 - Plugable launches Dell Venue 8 Pro charger Kickstarter project

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No presence informationTodd O. Klindt7/1/2014 3:59 PMNetcast0 

I take one little vacation and Shane and Lori hijack my show! In this episode, Shane takes the mic, all by his lonesome. I haven't been able to listen to the whole thing, but I'm sure it's okay. He talks about SharePoint, his dog, and how much he looks up to me. It's a little embarrassing, but I'm okay with it.

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Running Time: 27:31

Links:

03:00 - Todd's Mic - Blue Yeti Pro
24:00 - THE Ceiling fan!

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No presence informationTodd O. Klindt6/28/2014 9:42 AMWindows 8/8.14 

Since the spunky Dell Venue 8 Pro came out last year I’ve had a huge crush on it. It’s cute, it’s powerful, and it won’t break the bank. While the DV8 Pro is super fun, it has at least one annoying limitation. Because it uses a single USB OTG connection it can’t be charged while a USB device is attached. There are a couple of creative workarounds, including my own blog post, “How to use USB devices with your Dell Venue 8 Pro and charge it at the same time.” While my solution is both brilliant and elegant, it has a touch of kludge to it.

The good news is that the folks at Plugable have come to our rescue. I’ve been using a Plugable UD-3900 with my Surface Pro 2 for months, and I like it. The minds at Plugable have stayed up night and day and they’ve designed a Plugable dock for the DV8 Pro that will charge the device while also allowing you to use USB devices. Hallelujah! To gauge interest they’ve created a Kickstarter project.

If you have a Dell Venue 8 Pro or Lenovo Miix, and you’d like an elegant solution to this frustrating problem, consider helping Plugable out and pledging the project. I already have, you should too. Smile

tk

http://www.toddklindt.com/DV8ProDock

  
No presence informationTodd O. Klindt6/26/2014 4:40 PMNetcast0 

Tonight's netcast has a special treat, Todd and Shane in a hotel room. After they settle down they talk about tips for beginning podcasters, The June 2014 CU for SharePoint 2013, and patching the Distributed Cache. Then Shane fawns over his Lumia 1020 phone for a bit. Todd finished it up by talking about a new tech toy that he recently bought that might get him attacked by a crazed bystander.


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Running Time: 54:10

Links:

07:22 - 7 Tips For Beginner Podcasters
19:41 - SharePoint 2013 Patch installation script
20:24 - SharePoint 2013 Builds list
23:35 - How to patch the Distributed Cache in SharePoint 2013
39:07 - Parrot AR.Drone 2.0 GPS Edition Quadricopter

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No presence informationTodd O. Klindt6/15/2014 8:53 PMNetcast0 

Tonight's netcast delves into the black art of patching SharePoint without destroying your farm in the process. I'm looking at you, recent SharePoint 2013 patches. To be fair I also talk about some new functionality (besides breaking People Search) that April 2014 CU for SharePoint 2013 adds. I also talk about some reference material on virtualizing SharePoint on Hyper-V. I finish up with some of my favorite recent Windows Phone 8.1 tips, and I brag a little about a situation where I kicked the UPS' butt this week.

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Running Time: 42:14

Links:

1:29 – Production Notes
1:57 – Splunk
3:58 - Topics
3:58 - MS14-022 wiki page
11:48 - Provisioning site collections using SP App model in on-premises with just CSOM
16:02 - Use best practice configurations for the SharePoint 2013 virtual machines and Hyper-V environment
20:05 - User Profile Picture and Certificate Trusts
29:54 - Windows Phone tips
29:54 - Office Remote
31:30 - Files for Windows Phone

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No presence informationTodd O. Klindt6/5/2014 10:30 AMNetcast0 

In tonight's episode I go through a list of handy tools that any SharePoint admin worth hizzorher salt should have at the ready. I also talk about a couple of cool PowerShell tips and scripts I discovered in the last week. Then I cover the latest hysterical bug with the SharePoint 2013 April 2014 CU.

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Running Time: 32:22

Links:

03:55 - ULS Viewer is gone. *sniff* *sniff*
04:32 - I have it archived
07:00 - Tools for your SharePoint 2013 development toolbox
08:28 - SharePoint Manager
09:36 - SharePoint Search Tool
11:30 - Fiddler
12:35 - Reflector
16:30 - Open Scripts in a new tab in the PowerShell ISE using PSEdit
18:32 - Copy all SharePoint Files and Folders Using PowerShell
20:00 - How to Upload Files to SharePoint 2013 with PowerShell
20:53 - Issues converting Classic to Claims in SharePoint 2013 April 2013 CU
23:18 – SharePoint 2013 April 2014 CU Notes 
25:45 - MS14-022
28:30 - Notepad++

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No presence informationTodd O. Klindt5/26/2014 8:44 PMNetcast0 

In tonight's Netcast I wax nostalgically on the previous 199 Netcasts. I thank a few of the people that have helped me along the way. Then I go over some of my fondest memories of TechEd, and how you can create some of your own. Then I dig into the fun tech stuff. I talk about how to leverage OneDrive for Business in your on prem SharePoint farm. Next I talk about a Windows Phone update you should download. I follow that up with showing some cool stuff you can do with Cortana once you do. Finally I talk about not virtualizing SQL like a chump, and all the news that's fit to print about the April 2014 CU for SharePoint 2013.
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Running Time: 48:54

Links:

06:16 – Production Notes
09:15 - 200 episodes!
28:13 - Rename all of your databases with PowerShell
30:18 - TechEd overview
34:18 - All the TechEd 2014 slides and videos
34:50 - Get Up and Running Fast with Microsoft OneDrive for Business: Planning Guidance and Best Practices
37:55 - How to redirect users to Office 365 with OneDrive for Business
38:25 - Windows Phone 8.1 Preview update
40:11 - Have Cortana Wake Your PC by Time and Proximity
44:52 - Making SQL Server Work in VMware and Hyper-V screencast
46:12 - Brent Ozar’s blog
46:35 - April 2014 CU Wiki
47:35 – Shameless Self Promotion

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No presence informationTodd O. Klindt5/16/2014 4:25 PMNetcast0 

Tonight's episode is jampacked with SharePointy goodness. I talk about how to install SharePoint 2010 on Windows Server 2012 R2 in a supported fashion. Then I talk about why things take a long time to load up if your SharePoint server doesn't have Internet access. Then I talk a bit about OneDrive for Business and how you can leverage in your on-premises farm. I wrap things up by talking about how you can get good backups on your Windows Phone 8.1 device so you don't lose any of those funny pictures of your cat sleeping in a house plant. All that and more in Netcast 199.

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Running Time: 37:33

Links:

01:34 Production
03:55 - SharePoint 2010 SP2 ISO has support for Windows Server 2012 R2
12:45 - Best Practices for CRL Checking on SharePoint Servers
13:45 - All kinds of things try to access http://crl.microsoft.com
24:00 - OneDrive for Business Redirection to Office 365 Overview
26:50 - Backing up on Windows Phone 8.1
29:43 - Promotion

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No presence informationTodd O. Klindt5/5/2014 11:57 AMSharePoint 20100 

Late last week, or this last weekend Microsoft quietly updated the KB article for SharePoint 2010 Service Pack 2 to call out that if you have access to the MSDN or VL ISO media you can now install SharePoint 2010 on Windows Server 2012 R2. Here’s what they added:

Note: Deployments from the slipstream media at Microsoft Volume License Service Center (VLSC) and MSDN can now be performed on Windows Server 2012 R2 as of May 1, 2014.

This is great news for those of you that will be maintaining SharePoint 2010 for the foreseeable future but want all the cool new stuff in Windows Server 2012 R2. There is a piece missing though. If you do install this on Windows Server 2012 R2 you must either slipstream the February 2014 CU into the new ISO or immediately install the February 2014 CU after installation. The new ISO will install on Windows Server 2012 R2, but it’s not supported on it, if that makes sense.

There are a couple of other notes. First, SharePoint does not support installing Service Pack 2, the February 2014 CU and then upgrading the OS to Windows Server 2012 R2. It must be a fresh installation. I can hear those of you with existing SharePoint 2010 farms getting anxious. Don’t worry, it’s okay, we can get you there. If you dream of Windows Server 2012 R2 servers in your existing SharePoint 2010 it can still be a reality, you just have to work into it a little bit. First, make sure your existing SharePoint 2010 is at the February 2014 CU level (14.0.7116.5000) or higher. Then build a brand new Windows Server 2012 R2 server and install SharePoint 2010 SP2 with the new MSDN or VL ISO. Then patch it to February 2014 CU or whatever patch level your farm is at. You can then add it to your existing farm. If you go that route I would plan to do all the servers in your farm, and sooner rather than later. Each time you add a Windows Server 2012 R2 to your farm, pull out one of the older Windows Servers until they’re all gone. You should plan for that changeover to take days, not weeks, or fortnights. (I’ve clearly been watching too much Game of Thrones).

Also make sure you have a good backup of each of your old servers. Shamefully we all have those file system level tweaks that we’ve made, then forgotten about. Web.config is the usual place they hide out, but they show up other places too. You’ll need to do those by hand when you add the new servers to your farm. The same goes for SSL certs, or any other certs you have.

Good luck. Leave a comment below if you go this route. Let us all know how it turned out.

As always you can keep up to date on all the SharePoint 2010 mayhem at http://www.toddklindt.com/sp2010builds and you can follow my SharePoint 2010 Patches twitter account to get breaking news about SharePoint 2010 patches.

Here is the official SharePoint 2010 support for Windows Server 2012 and Windows Server 2012 R2 KB article. It was last updated to Rev 12 November 21, 2013. It will likely get updated again.

tk

http://www.toddklindt.com/SP2010SP2NewISO

  
No presence informationTodd O. Klindt5/2/2014 9:34 AMNetcast0 

In tonight's action-packed episode I cover all the fun and frivolity of SPTechCon. Then I move on to even funnier topics and I talk about SharePoint 2013 Service Pack 1. I talk about its rerelease and how to tell it apart from its earlier, buggier version. Then I talk a little about OneNote and Surface Pros. Fun for the whole family.

Oh, and the audio and video get a little out of sync at the end. I’m looking into that.

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Running Time: 42:39

Links:

02:08 - Production Notes
05:21 - SPTechCon recap
14:14 - Windows Weekly
17:45 - SharePoint 2013 Service Pack 1 has been rereleased
19:43 - How to tell which Service Pack 1 you have installed on SharePoint 2013
24:32 - Creating a template in OneNote
27:15 - Comments about applying the new SP1 on top of the SP2013+SP1 ISO - Brian Lalancette's link
28:20 - AutoSPInstaller
28:32 - Educational discount on Surface Pro 2
31:14 - Make your Surface even cooler
34:30 - OneDrive for Business increases storage and adds standalone option

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No presence informationTodd O. Klindt4/30/2014 3:31 PMNetcast0 

This episode was filmed at SPTechCon in San Francisco. I let my ugliest fan, Shane Young, cohost with me. Since this was recorded on the road I don't have my regular equipment and the audio and video aren't at the quality you've come to expect. Shane and I talk about some fun PowerShell tips and then dig in to Windows Phone. We show how to project your phone on the screen, how to make my Podcast more tolerable on Windows Phone and much more.

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Running Time: 55:33

Links:

2:18 - Production Notes
09:10 - Open PowerShell from Explorer
12:02 - Assign value versus compare in PowerShell (put in your blog post)
12:53 - A World of Scripts at your Fingertips – Introducing Script Browser
16:20 - Project your phone on your PC
18:40 - Podcast playback speed
26:02 - Shane's new phone
41:02 - wpcentral.com
50:00 – Shameless Self Promotion

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No presence informationTodd O. Klindt4/24/2014 4:32 PMSharePoint 201310 

Edit: 7/3 added MSDN and VL ISO screenshot and explanation

It’s been a fun couple of months for guys like me that watch SharePoint patching. Earlier this month Microsoft discovered a particularly nasty bug in SharePoint 2013 Service Pack 1 and they pulled it. They locked their best and brightest patchmeisters into a room, threw in some Mt. Dew and Snickers bars and had them crank out a newer, better, stronger, more-able-to-be-patched version of Service Pack 1. If you were one of the people that installed the first, broken SP1, the fix is to install the new, shiny SP1 over top of it. The problem is figuring out which version of SP1 you have installed. The new SP1 looks an awful lot like his older brother, right down to the Farm build number (15.0.4569.1000). There is an easy way to tell them apart in Central Administration. Click the Upgrade and Migration link on the left, then Check product and patch installation status. That should take you to the /_admin/PatchStatus.aspx page. A first generation SP1 server will look like this:

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The two important pieces are the KB article for the patch, KB2817429, and the patch version, 15.0.4569.1506.

A second generation SP1 server will look like this:

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Its KB number is KB2880552 and it build number is 15.0.4571.1502.

If you installed SharePoint 2013 from MSDN or Volume License (VL) media it might have Service Pack 1 integrated. In that case, everything is okay. It's patch status page looks like this:



If you have the Bad SP1 just install the Good SP1 over top of it like any other update. Don’t forget to run the Config Wizard afterwards to show SharePoint you really mean business. If your server was installed with the MSDN or VL media you can still install the new SP1 over top if you want to be super sure you're up to date.

Don’t forget to follow @SP2013Patches on Twitter and bookmark my SharePoint 2013 Builds page to keep on all the patching craziness.

tk

ShortURL: http://www.toddklindt.com/WhichSP2013SP1

  
No presence informationTodd O. Klindt4/22/2014 1:10 PMSharePoint 20135 

Just as promised, Microsoft has rereleased Service Pack 1 for SharePoint 2013. Hopefully this time with fewer bugs. I haven’t taken it for a full test drive yet, so this blog post will likely get updated in the next few days.

If you have already installed SP1 on your farm, install this new SP1 on top of it, then run the Config Wizard, like you would with any other patch. If you’re at some lower patch level, use the same steps.

Here are some links.

SharePoint Foundation – KBDownload

SharePoint Server – KBDownload

Project Server – KBDownload

Office Web Apps – KBDownload

I have not added this to my SharePoint 2013 Builds Page yet. I’m busy at SPTechCon right now, but I’ll get it added soon.

tk

ShortURL: http://www.toddklindt.com/SP2013SP1Again

  
No presence informationTodd O. Klindt4/16/2014 9:01 PMNetcast0 

Tonight's show is all about Windows Phone 8.1, with a little bit of SharePoint and PowerShell sprinkled in for good measure. We spend the bulk of the show talking about some of my favorite new features in WP 8.1 and how you can get it for yourself. I also talk about a couple of blog posts I've published recently. One on uploading files to SharePoint with PowerShell, another on how to encrypt credentials in PowerShell scripts so they aren't exposed in plain text. Good ideas all around.

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Running Time: 47:35

Links:

04:30 - The Microsoft Virtual Machine Converter 2.0
05:51 - Vulnerabilities in Microsoft Word and Office Web Apps Could Allow Remote Code Execution (2949660)
07:38 - Windows Phone 8.1
08:58 - wpcentral.com
9:51 - Paul Thurrott's Blog
10:05 - Hands on with the new swipe keyboard in Windows Phone 8.1
12:41 - Action center
16:40 - Quiet hours
21:10 - Cortana
26:40 - Do you want to enable Cortana outside the US? Here's how you do it
29:00 - All you need to know about the Windows Phone 8.1 'Preview for Developers'
33:20 - How to Upload Files to SharePoint 2013 with PowerShell
34:50 - Save Encrypted Passwords to Disk with PowerShell
40:39 - Lori Gowin ( Blog | Twitter )
40:48 - Mike Robbins ( Blog | Twitter )
41:10 - PowerTip: Update Windows Defender with PowerShell
43:00 - Free PowerShell ebooks

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No presence informationTodd O. Klindt4/14/2014 9:27 AMPowerShell; SharePoint 2010; SharePoint 20131 

I’ve posted a lot of PowerShell scripts here over the years. Some good, some not-so-good. Okay, mostly not-so-good. Besides my very obvious lack of PowerShell prowess, one thing has constantly bugged me about a few of the scripts I’ve written, they contain passwords in plain text. Here are a few examples:

How to Upload Files to SharePoint 2013 with PowerShell

How to schedule SharePoint backups with PowerShell

The PowerShell script I use to create Active Directory users

Using PowerShell to set up a test environment

How to use PowerShell to replace DCPROMO in Windows Server 2012

In each of those scripts I did a bad, bad thing, I put the password for a privileged account in plain text. Shame on me. My penance for this sin is that I have to write this blog post, explaining a more secure way to handle this situation. I also said “Hail Jeff Snover” 100 times.

The TLDR version is that instead of putting the passwords in plain text in the script, we should save them, encrypted in a file, and use them from there. PowerShell is constantly improving. It’s getting stronger. I’m pretty sure Skynet uses PowerShell when it takes over the world. SharePoint 2010 uses PowerShell v2, which has one way to save encrypted passwords. SharePoint 2013 uses PowerShell v3, which has a better way. I’ll show you both here. Both versions will work with SharePoint 2013, only the first will work with SharePoint 2010. And yes, while you can install PowerShell v3 on a server running SharePoint 2010, you can’t use the SharePoint 2010 SnapIn in PowerShell v3, so you’d have to use the PowerShell v2 regardless.

SharePoint 2010 (PowerShell v2)

First, we need to create the file that contains the encrypted password. Here is the PowerShell I use to do that:

# Create-EncryptedPasswordFile
$password = Read-Host "Enter Password: " -AsSecureString
$filename = Read-Host "Enter file to save as: "
$secure = ConvertFrom-SecureString $password
$secure | Out-File $filename

Here’s what it looks like in practice:

image

The password I entered was the venerable pass@word1. You can see the file it creates is plain text, but it bears no resemblance at all to pass@word1 so bad guys can’t see what your passwords are.

Of course creating the encrypted password is only half the battle, and maybe even the easy half. You actually have to be able to use the password for this to be any fun. Let’s look at the How to Upload Files to SharePoint 2013 with PowerShell blog post. Scenario 2 could take advantage of this. Let’s look at the piece of the original script that dealt with authentication:

# Since we’re doing this remotely, we need to authenticate
$securePassword = ConvertTo-SecureString "pass@word1" -AsPlainText -Force
$credentials = New-Object System.Management.Automation.PSCredential ("contoso\johnsmith", $securePassword)

There’s that password in plain text <shudder>. Let’s fix that. Here’s what it would look like using the file we created above:

# Since we’re doing this remotely, we need to authenticate
$temp = Get-Content C:\temp\secretfile.txt
$securePassword = ConvertTo-SecureString -String $temp

$credentials = New-Object System.Management.Automation.PSCredential ("contoso\johnsmith", $securePassword)

Now you can run your scripts with piece of mind. Let’s check out the SharePoint 2013 version.

SharePoint 2013 (PowerShell v3)

The PowerShell v3 method is a little smoother. Here’s how we create the file:

# Create-EncryptedCredentialFile
$credentials = Get-Credential
$filename = 'C:\temp\secretfile.txt’
$credentials | Export-CliXml -Path $filename

Notice that the file stores both the username and the password, not just the password like the v2 version. Here’s how you would use it in the same example as above:

# Since we’re doing this remotely, we need to authenticate
$credPath = 'C:\temp\secretfile.txt’
$credentials = Import-CliXml -Path $credPath

That would replace the entire section, not just the yellow highlighted pieces that the PowerShell v2 solution replaces. It’s also important to know that only the user that exported the file can import it. This is great from a security standpoint, but it gets tricky if you are using the exported credentials for scheduled tasks. If that’s the case you’ll need to log in as (or at least run PowerShell as) the service account and export the file that way.

Wrapping It Up

Muuuuch better. We didn’t have to force PowerShell to do anything it doesn’t want to do. Now, no matter what access a bad guy has to your server, short of a key logger, they have no way of figuring out your password. Now, if they have that file, and they know what it is and what account it’s for they can use it to do stuff as that account. So you still need to keep your scripts and this password file secure. This can be used for good though, too. Now you can write scripts that run as a specific account without the person running that script needing to know what the password is, or being able to discover it. This is great for people building SharePoint farms, or support personnel.

I’d like to apologize for publishing PowerShell scripts that might encourage bad behavior. Please forgive me. In the future I’ll try to use this more secure method for baking passwords in. Hopefully you can also use this technique to make your environments more secure too.

I would also like to give a hearty “Thanks” to Lori Gowin (Blog | Twitter) and Mike Robbins (Blog | Twitter). They both very graciously read through this blog post multiple times and offered several valuable suggestions. It sucks way less because of their input. Thanks again.

tk

http://www.toddklindt.com/PoshSecurePasswords

  
No presence informationTodd O. Klindt4/9/2014 10:50 PMNetcast0 

In tonight's Netcast I discuss the fun and frivolity around SharePoint 2013 Service Pack 1 and its strict "no patches for you!" policy. I talk about the User Profile Service and PowerShell briefly and show you a way to reduce your chances of screwing up your Production farm by a solid 17%. Then I talk at length about the new Update to Windows 8.1/2012 R2 and a few things to look forward to in Windows Phone 8.1.

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Running Time: 50:51

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04:55 - Don’t Install SharePoint 2013 Service Pack 1
13:36 - Change Central Admin Theme
16:01 - User Profile MySite Cleanup Job
18:36 - Improve Surface sound for practically nothing
20:54 - Download PowerShell 5.0 Preview
21:39 - Installing Software with the OneGet Module in PowerShell version 5
26:13 - What's new in Windows 8.1 Update?
26:38 - Windows 8.1 Update blog post
31:59 - Exploring Windows 8.1 Update
31:54 - Windows Phone 8.1 Great Features
40:01 - Sign up as a Windows Phone Developer
43:38 - Windows in the car

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SharePoint 2013 Professional Administration

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ShortURL: http://www.toddklindt.com/Netcast195

  
No presence informationTodd O. Klindt4/6/2014 10:15 PMSharePoint 2010; SharePoint 2013; PowerShell4 

Every once in a while I get to add a little flair to a project I’m working on. Recently I was working on a couple of projects that intersected, sort of. First, I’ve been writing some scripts to automate some processes we have. These scripts do some pretty good logging to the file system in case there are problems. The average person would have stopped there, but not me. I wanted to take it a step farther. I added a bit where the script uploads the log files to a SharePoint document library. This makes them easier to get to for support personnel, and it makes it easier to search through them for specific issues. SharePoint saves the day again.

The other project I’ve working on is making my Netcast production more automated. Part of that process was using PowerShell to edit the MP3 tags on my Netcast files. While I was pretty proud of that, the previous project made me  realize I could take things one step further and have that same script go ahead and upload the MP3 file when it’s finished. One less thing for me to put off when I’m procrastinating. Hooray efficiency. Plus I get braggin’ rights. Score!

On the surface, these two things sound like they’re the same thing, uploading files to SharePoint. Once you get into the weeds though, they’re actually different. In the first case I’m uploading a file to a local SharePoint server. This is pretty simple. While PowerShell doesn’t have a Upload-SPFile cmdlet we’re pretty close to it. Easy peasy. In the second case I’m uploading the files to a remote SharePoint server. Since it’s a remote server we can’t just add the SharePoint PowerShell module and use the same techniques as we would with a local server. Subtle differences, but important differences. As I was searching for “Upload files to SharePoint with PowerShell” I found most articles covered one or the other. Which is very handy if your situation matches the article’s. Not so handy if they don’t. So I wrote this blog post to cover both scenarios.

Scenario 1: Uploading Files to SharePoint on the SharePoint Server

Here’s a quick example of how to upload a document on a SharePoint server using the SharePoint PowerShell module which uses the SharePoint Object Model.

# Set the variables
$WebURL = “http://portal.contoso.com/sites/stuff”
$DocLibName = “Docs”
$FilePath = “C:\Docs\stuff\Secret Sauce.docx”

# Get a variable that points to the folder
$Web = Get-SPWeb $WebURL
$List = $Web.GetFolder($DocLibName)
$Files = $List.Files

# Get just the name of the file from the whole path
$FileName = $FilePath.Substring($FilePath.LastIndexOf("\")+1)

# Load the file into a variable
$File= Get-ChildItem $FilePath

# Upload it to SharePoint
$Files.Add($DocLibName +"/" + $FileName,$File.OpenRead(),$false)
$web.Dispose()

In the case we use the Add member of the SPFileCollection class. It has a few overloads, so check them out, there might be one that better fits what you’re trying to do.

Scenario 2: Uploading Files to SharePoint from a Remote Machine

Since we can’t use the object model to upload files remotely we have to go about it a different way. I use the WebClient object, though there might be other ways. Here’s an example:

# Set the variables
$destination = "http://portal.contoso.com/sites/stuff/Docs”
$File = get-childitem “C:\Docs\stuff\Secret Sauce.docx”

# Since we’re doing this remotely, we need to authenticate
$securePasssword = ConvertTo-SecureString "pass@word1" -AsPlainText -Force
$credentials = New-Object System.Management.Automation.PSCredential ("contoso\johnsmith", $securePasssword)

# Upload the file
$webclient = New-Object System.Net.WebClient
$webclient.Credentials = $credentials
$webclient.UploadFile($destination + "/" + $File.Name, "PUT", $File.FullName)

Like the SPFileCollection class’ Add member, the UploadFile member of the WebClient class has a few overloads to consider. Check them out so you know what your options are.

PowerShell is cool. SharePoint is cool. Uploading files is cool. It just makes sense to use PowerShell to upload files to SharePoint. Hopefully this blog post covers all the scenarios you might encounter.

tk

ShortURL: http://www.toddklindt.com/PoshUploadFiles

Edit 4/8/2014 – 1,000 apologies. The code in Scenario 2 didn’t work. I should have checked it better. It’s all good now.

  
No presence informationTodd O. Klindt4/3/2014 11:03 AMSharePoint 201329 

This morning Microsoft updated the KB article for SharePoint Service Pack 1 with this notice:

We have recently uncovered an issue with this Service Pack 1 package that may prevent customers who have Service Pack 1 from deploying future public or cumulative updates. As a precautionary measure, we have deactivated the download page until a new package is published.

If you haven’t installed this in your Production environment yet, please hold off. If you have it in a Test or Dev environment go ahead and keep testing it. I’ll update this blog post as I get more information.

Bill Baer (he's a big deal at Microsoft) has stated that the MSDN ISO that has SP1 included is not impacted by this issue.

To keep up on all the SharePoint 2013 patch happenings you can check out my SharePoint 2013 Builds page. You can also follow my SP2013Patches Twitter account where I tweet out SharePoint 2013 patch related information.

FAQs (added 4/7/2014)

Q1) I was going to install SharePoint 2013 in a new farm with Service Pack 1 in a week (a day, 17 minutes, etc). This seems scary, should I still do it?

A2) First, breathe, it's gonna be okay. :) If I were installing a new farm in the next couple of days I would not install it with Service Pack 1. I would either install the farm with the March 2013 Public Update, or I'd wait a few days to see what Microsoft says about how to fix existing farms with Service Pack 1.

Q2) But, but, but I already have Service Pack 1 installed in my Production farm. Woe is me! Am I screwed? Am I going to have to quit SharePoint and become a Notes administrator? My family will be so ashamed!

A2) I would, never, ever recommend anyone take drastic action like becoming a Notes administrator. That's the kind of shame that doesn't wash off. If you currently have a Production farm with Service Pack 1 on it you're fine. Microsoft will fix this. They promise, and I believe them. I know, I know, "patching the patch that makes it so you can't install another patch" is pretty funny to think about, but I'm sure they can pull it off.

Q3) What if I have Service Pack 1 in a Test farm? Can it infect my Production farm?

A3) Test farms are fine. If you're currently testing Service Pack 1 in a Test farm, keep on keepin' on. When the Service Pack 1 fix comes out drop it into your Test farm and see what happens. I would still plan on putting Service Pack 1 on your Production farm eventually.

Q4) I installed a new SharePoint 2013 farm using the MSDN ISO that had Service Pack 1 baked in. Am I in trouble, too?

A4) No, you're fine. Bill Baer told me that this issue only affects farms that were patched to Service Pack 1. Farms that were installed with the MSDN ISO are not affected. If you used an RTM ISO and slipstreamed Service Pack 1 in you are affected. But like I said in A2, you'll be fine.

tk

http://www.toddklindt.com/SP2013SP1kaput

Edit: Added piece about the MSDN ISO

Edit (4/7/2014): Added the FAQs

  
No presence informationTodd O. Klindt4/2/2014 10:53 PMWindows 8/8.12 

Today was the first day of Microsoft’s Build conference and it was busy. They announced a bunch of new products. Some available soon, some available not so soon. One of the most exciting things coming out soon is the Update to Windows 8.1. It’s already available on MSDN, and it will trickle out as a series of patches next week on Patch Tuesday. Being the impatient guy that I am, I downloaded it and installed it today. In this blog post I’ll talk about some of the install particulars and I’ll also cover some of the new features.

Installation

If you have an MSDN subscription you can go out there now and download the Update today. There are three downloads, one for x86, and one for x64, and one for ARM. Grab whichever ones are appropriate for your existing Windows 8.1 devices. The x64 version will also work for any Windows 2012 R2 servers you have laying around.

When you download the package it’s a zip file containing six Windows patches and a readme file. The readme file provides some guidance on which order you’ll need to install the patches. Don’t be surprised if you already have any of the patches. Every machine of mine that I patched today already had KB2919442. The KB2919355 patch is 700 MB and seems to be the bulk of the update. I had to reboot after installing each patch, so be prepared for that.

If you don’t have an MSDN account, or you’re just more patient than I am, then you’ll get all these patches as part of the regular Windows Update process. So make sure you have Windows set to download and install new patches as they come out.

Features

There are a ton of new features in the Update. I’m not going to be able to cover them all in this post. When you get done here, check out Paul Thurrott’s review. He covers a bunch of things I don’t.

The big focus on this Update, much like the update to Window 8.1 is making things better for people using mice and on desktop PCs. Several features help that out. Probably the most notable is that there is now a Search button, and sometimes a Power button in the upper right corner of the Start Screen, next to the user’s name.

image

Both of these functions were already available from the Charms bar, but that can be tough to coax out with a mouse and not everybody knows about the Win + C hotkey. Also, if you’re accessing the machine through remote control software, or virtual machine software, it just might not be possible. Once you have the Update installed you’ll be able to hit the Start Button, then either the Power or Search buttons. Oddly, the Power button does not show up on tablets. It only shows up on Desktop PCs and laptops. Paul goes into it more in his article, but Microsoft has decided the Power button wasn’t a good fit for devices they consider slates. The Search button simply brings out the Search bar. Both Search and Power work exactly the same from the buttons as they would if you fired them up from the Charms bar.

Another nod to Desktop users can be found in the PC Settings area. While Microsoft has been diligent about adding more and more settings in the Metro Change PC Settings pages, there always seems to be one setting that’s just not there. Now there’s a “control panel” link at the bottom that takes you to the Desktop Control Panel. If you can’t find it there, it can’t be found.

While we’re talking about PC Settings, another one of our prayers has been answered. We can finally remove wireless networks. In the Networks page click Manage Networks to get a list of the all the wireless networks your machine has connected to. Click one to remove it.

image

Metro apps coexist with the Desktop a little better with the Update. It’s now possible to pin Metro apps to the Taskbar, and the Update pins the Microsoft Store for you to get you started. Metro apps also have a title bar that drops down when you hover near the top of the screen. This title bar has minimize and close buttons, like we’re used to seeing in Desktop apps.

Microsoft has also made it marginally easier to locate new applications after you’ve installed them. After an application has been installed there will be a reminder in the lower right corner of the Start Screen. If you go to the Applications view all newly installed applications will be highlighted. While this isn’t a homerun, by any means, it is a step in the right direction.

The update wasn’t aimed solely at Desktop PCs, tablets got some love too. Namely, Microsoft wants to expand its market share in the tablet space in the worst way. Today at Build they announced that there will be no licensing fees for Windows devices with screens smaller than 9”. I expect to see a flood of devices with 8.999999” screens any day. Along with that, the 8.1 Update includes better support for machines with limited RAM and small amounts of storage. With this Update Windows 8.1 will support running on devices with as little as 1 GB of RAM, and 16 GB of storage. It does this by trimming the OS down, and by running it out of a compressed WIM file. This feature requires an SSD and will only be available for new devices. When I upgraded my Dell Venue 8 Pro it was not able to take advantage of this. I think this is a step in the right direction. I feel part of the reason Windows 8 tablets never took off was because Microsoft strictly controlled the hardware it could go on, and those hardware specs were pretty tight. They wanted to make sure everyone had a good experience, but I think it bit them. I think the combination of free licensing, and better support for low cost hardware will result in us seeing a lot more Windows devices in the wild.

So go out there and install the Update. Let me know in the Comments section how it went for you.

tk

ShortURL: http://www.toddklindt.com/Win81Update

  
No presence informationTodd O. Klindt4/2/2014 3:42 PMNetcast0 

I start this Netcast with a funny picture about cumulative updates, and a funny video of someone trying to watch my show. Then I dig into some deep disaster recovery topics on how to build a warm recovery farm, and how to get Workflow Manager ready to be highly available. Then we chat about changing service accounts and special characters in PowerShell. I finish up with giving a priceless productivity tip in OneNote, and show you how to get your entire Twitter history.

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Running Time: 44:13

Links:

03:41 - Why I don't install Cus right away
04:35 - Me on TV
06:35 - Hot-Standby/Disaster-Recovery SharePoint Farms – Basic Setup & Failover
18:30 - Workflow Manager Disaster Recovery – Preparations
21:35 - Changing SharePoint 2010’s Service Account Passwords
27:43 - How To Add A Page in OneNote Exactly Where You Want It
31:41 - Windows Phone 8.1 is finished!
33:13 - Windows Phone 8.1 Features
37:28 - Request your Twitter archive

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SharePoint 2013 Professional Administration

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ShortURL: http://www.toddklindt.com/Netcast194

  
No presence informationTodd O. Klindt4/1/2014 3:49 PMWindows 8/8.110 

With the release of Windows 8.1, and soon the Update to Windows 8.1 now is as good a time as any to go ahead and ditch Window 7, or heaven forbid Windows XP, and embrace Windows 8 with both arms wide open. When Windows 8 came out, it got some negative press, some of which was even earned. In this article I’m going to give my top ten 11 tips on how to make Windows 8 the daily driver on your desktop PC without pulling your hair out, or using Satya Nadella’s name in vain.

1) Update to Windows 8.1, then Windows 8.1 Update

I almost feel silly saying this, but keep your OS up to date. Windows 8.1 came out several months ago and took some huge strides in making Windows 8 better for desktop PCs. Unfortunately Microsoft didn’t do a good job promoting it, or making it easy for the average user to stumble across. It’s almost like it’s a prize at the end of a treasure hunt. It’s a free upgrade, so there’s no reason not to install it. And for my readers that say, “We always wait until Service Pack 1,” well, wait no more, this IS Service Pack 1. Besides, a bunch of the following tips will require Windows 8.1, so go ahead and install it. Once you do, you’ll be the envy of all your friends in your Wednesday night bowling league. I promise.

Now that I’ve convinced you to install it you’re probably wondering how to install it. That gets a little tricky. You get Windows 8.1 from the Microsoft Store. So if you don’t go there, you’ll never see it. You can get there by hitting the Store icon on the Start Screen, or going to the Start Screen and just typing “Store.” If you don’t see it right away when you go to the Store it might be because you haven’t installed all the Windows Patches needed. Go back to the Start Screen and type “update” and install the Windows Updates. All of them. You will probably get to reboot a few times, so make sure you have a good book handy. Then go back to the store and hopefully Windows 8.1 will be waiting for you.

The Windows 8.1 download is huge. It’s over 3 GB. That’s like a whole season of House of Cards and some Scooby Doo cartoons on Netflix. Make sure to give it some time to run in the background. While you’re waiting, you can read up on what’s new in Windows 8.1. You can also buy the Windows 8.1 Field Guide from Paul Thurrott. 

2) Boot To Desktop

One of the many desktop friendly changes that came with Windows 8.1 was the ability to boot directly to the Desktop. You know, how we’re used to Windows booting for the last 20 years or so. When Windows 8 came out it debuted the infamous Start Screen. Which is absolutely fabulous on things with a touch screen, but absolutely dismal on things without. In Windows 8 there was no way around the Start Screen. Every time your machine powered on you had to click the Desktop tile on the Start Screen to get to the Desktop. In Windows 8.1 they added the glorious “Boot to Desktop” option. To activate it right click on the Taskbar (after you’ve clicked that blasted Desktop tile one final, satisfying time) and click Properties. In the Properties box click the Navigation tab. Check the box next to go to desktop, then click Ok.

image

While you’re in that page read over the other options. There are some other good ones in there like “Show my desktop background on Start” and my favorite, the one that replaces the crusty old Command Prompt with sleek, sexy PowerShell.

3) Expand Taskbar Items

While you’re in the Taskbar properties go ahead and change another one of my favorite settings, Taskbar buttons. This setting lets you control how large the taskbar buttons are. By default it is set to “Always combine, hide labels.” This means the taskbar buttons will always be small, regardless of how much empty space the Taskbar has. That’s just wasteful! I much prefer the “Combine when taskbar is full” setting. If you’re using a desktop PC you probably have decent sized monitors and plenty of space on your taskbar. No reason to not take advantage of that space. It also makes them easier to click with a mouse, as they are a larger target.

image

As a bonus, this setting works on Windows 8 and Windows 7 too.

4) Only use Desktop Internet Explorer

With Windows 8 the emphasis was very clearly touch devices, which is great for touch devices. Not so great for non-touch devices. One instance of this was with Internet Explorer. For maximum confusion and frustration, Windows 8/8.1 comes with two separate versions of Internet Explorer. One is the Desktop version we’ve been using since Alta Vista was the search engine of choice. The second version, we’ll call it Metro IE, is optimized for the touch experience. The problem is depending how a web page is opened, you might get Desktop IE or Metro IE. If you’re on a Desktop PC, Metro IE es no bueno.

Fortunately there’s a way to control this behavior and set it so your web pages always open up in Desktop IE. Open up Desktop IE and click the settings cog in the upper right, then click “Internet options.” The setting we’re looking for is at the top of the Programs tab. Select “Always in Internet Explorer on the desktop.”

image

After you change that, no matter how you stumble on that next link of glorious hysterical cat videos, it will open in Desktop IE.

5) Install Desktop Skype

Along those same lines, the version of Skype that comes with Windows 8/8.1 is a Metro app. And while it works okay in a touch environment, it’s very painful in a Desktop environment. It’s clumsy and it takes up too much screen space. And I’m pretty sure it ate the last Funyuns, then put the empty bag back in the cupboard.  There’s good news though, you can install the Desktop version of Skype and get back to how Skype should be. Just download the desktop client and install it. Go ahead and pin it to your Start Screen. Make sure you pin “Skype for desktop” not just “Skype” which is the disappointing Metro version.

6) Type on the Start Page

One of the big problems with the new Metro interface is that it’s tough to discover things. You can’t just click or right click around and find them. One of Windows 8’s hidden gems is that when you’re on the Start Screen, you can just start typing and Windows will automatically start searching for you. Can’t find a program you installed? Just start typing. Looking for a particular setting? Just start typing. Looking for that picture of the baby throwing up on Grandpa? Just start typing. It’s pretty handy once you get used to using it.

7) Scroll Down for Apps

This is another thing that was improved in Windows 8.1, the ability to find apps that aren’t pinned on the Start Screen. Once Windows 8.1 is installed we get a handy down arrow in the lower left corner of the Start Screen. When it’s clicked it shows us all the applications installed on the machine. There are a variety of ways to sort and filter the apps, depending on what you’re looking for.

image

If you still can’t find what you’re looking for, you can use the old “just start typing” trick we talked about above. By default Search has the focus, so if you just can’t find that new version of Mahjongg you installed, you can type “mah” and it should pop right up.

8) Right Click on the Start Button for more Goodies

The most celebrated feature added in Windows 8.1 was the return of the Start Button. That alone is great for us Desktop users and cause for much celebration. It makes it a lot easier to get to the Start Screen, especially if it’s in a VM or RDP window. Along with having the glorious Start Button Microsoft stuffed a whole bunch of shortcuts into the context menu of the Start Button. Go ahead, right click on it and see what’s there.

image

And if right-clicking isn’t your thing, you can hit the Win+X shortcut key to get to it too. Here’s a full list of the rest of the Windows 8 Keyboard shortcuts. There’s some gold in them there hills.

9) Install Modern Mix

On a slate, full screen, finger friendly Metro apps work well. On a 24” monitor it seems a bit unnecessary for Solitaire to get the whole 24 inches. And splitting the screen with the Desktop doesn’t cut it either. Unfortunately there’s no way out of the box to run Metro apps anything but full screen or split screen. Some apps, like Skype and IE have both Metro and Desktop versions, but most don’t. We must have all been really good, and eaten our vegetables as children, because there’s a thing called Modern Mix that addresses this need. For a measly $5 you can run Metro apps inside of windows on the Desktop. And if the $5 price tag wasn’t enough for you to just buy it sight unseen it has a free 30 day trial. That’s more than enough time for you to fall in love with it.

10) Pin Metro Apps to the Taskbar

With Modern Mix, or the soon to be released (as of March 2014) Update to Windows 8.1, it will be possible to pin Metro apps to the Desktop’s Taskbar. This gives you quick access to some of your favorite Metro apps. When you install the Update it automatically pins the Store app there to get you started.

11) Make Good Use of Multiple Monitors

These days it seems you’re just not cool unless you have multiple monitors. I know I wasn’t cool until I did. Traditionally Windows hasn’t done a great job handling that. In the past I’ve had to buy 3rd party software to manage them the way that I want to. Windows 8 is the first Windows where that hasn’t been necessary. If Windows detects multiple monitors it lights up some configuration for them, including my favorite, which puts the buttons for programs only on the Taskbar of the monitor where they are running.

image

When Windows first started really supporting multiple monitors well (Vista, maybe?) the taskbar started on your main monitor and the programs were just in the order that you opened them. It was possible to click a program in the Taskbar on monitor 1, but have the program itself pop up in monitor 2 or 3. Highly annoying. You can still have this behavior in Windows 8, if you like to be annoyed, but you can also tell Windows to put the program’s button in the taskbar of the monitor where it’s really at. 3 out of 4 dentists agree that is better.

When Windows 8 came out it was much maligned by people not using slates, and rightfully so. Microsoft heard our pleas though, and they’ve addressed a lot of those issues. If you haven’t already taken Windows 8 for a spin, now is a great time. Using these 11 tips will ensure that your experience is at least 26% better. That’s just science.

tk

ShortURL: http://www.toddklindt.com/DontHateWindows8

  
No presence informationTodd O. Klindt3/29/2014 4:31 PMTech Stuff8 

Sometimes I feel like I’m a little slow picking things up, kind of like the kid at the back of the class eating paste. Today is one of those days. As I’ve talked about in my Netcasts, I use OneNote a lot. Every day. I’d be miserable without it. I’d give up sliced bread before I gave up OneNote. One of my biggest complaints is that there is no automated way to sort the pages (the things along the right hand side), either alphabetically or numerically. Over the years I’ve kept sections (the things across the top) for customers, projects, and Netcasts. All things that benefit greatly from having the pages (still on the right) in a predictable order. For years I’ve clicked “Add Page” at the top of the pages column, which puts my shiny new page allllll the way at the bottom of the pages. Then, like a punk, I drag it up to wherever I want. It’s pretty inefficient and it always makes me feel rotten about myself.

And then today happened. 

I was in OneNote, like I always am, and I noticed this little gem:

image

Being the curious, and not very smart, sort, I clicked it to see what would happen. What happened was marvelous! Miraculous! Super seriously cool! It created a page, right there!!!! You read that right, right there! No more dragging the page up from the deep depths of the page list. I didn’t think it was possible, but I think I love OneNote even more today than I did yesterday.

If you haven’t already seen, OneNote is free. And you can Email your notes into OneNote with me@onenote.com. And I also heard that it was OneNote that invented magnets, and just gave the world that technology. True story.

tk

ShortURL: http://www.toddklindt.com/OneNotePageMiracle

  
No presence informationTodd O. Klindt3/27/2014 9:36 PMNetcast0 

Tonight's Netcast is a busy one. We take some time to talk about a new SharePoint Foundation patch and when you should install it. We also talk about some fancy footwork you can do to slipstream patches with the March 2013 PU. The we chat a little about SQL Server 2014 and what you'll need to do if you want to use it with SharePoint 2013. Speaking of SQL Server, we also talk about some new replication options with SQL. I wrap things up by showing off some cool new OneNote functionality that utilizes email and sharks with lasers on their heads.

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Running Time: 44:13

Links:

7:20 - March 2014 PU for Foundation
9:45 - Slipstreaming SP2013 with March 2013 PU and a later CU
13:00 - SharePoint 2013 April 2014 CU needed
19:05 - Support for SQL Server Always On Async Replication with SharePoint 2013
25:45 - Fun configuring Office web apps 2013 (OWA)
29:48 - SPC videos on Channel 9
31:25 - Script to download SPC videos
33:45 - Email your notes into OneNote with me@onenote.com

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ShortURL: http://www.toddklindt.com/Netcast193

  
No presence informationTodd O. Klindt3/24/2014 3:14 PMNetcast2 

Tonight's show covers a bunch of topics. We talk about how to get some of that great SharePoint Conference content without actually going to Vegas. For free! Then I cover some other free stuff like OneNote and Office Lens. Oslo is so cool that we cover it two weeks in a row. Continuing on the topic of Search we talk about some complications with Search in Foundation and moving temp directories around. If Incoming Email is your deal, I talk a little about how that has changed in SharePoint 2013.


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Running Time: 47:47

Links:

1:09 – FanatiBlaster
9:25 - Download all of the SharePoint Conference videos and PowerPoint presentations
13:35 - OneNote is free
15:58 - Office Lens is also free
21:45 - Introducing codename Oslo and the Office Graph
23:46 - Search in Foundation
28:57 - Incoming email changes
32:30 - SharePoint 2013 Search IO critical component locations

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ShortURL: http://www.toddklindt.com/Netcast192

  
No presence informationTodd O. Klindt3/17/2014 2:06 PMNetcast0 

In this episode I talk about all the fun I had at the SharePoint Conference. I cover our sessions and some of the other events that were there. Then I talk about Service Pack 1 for SharePoint 2013, and how super cool it is. Then I cover a couple of new things to look forward to if you have a Windows tablet.

I did some new things with the audio and video this week. Let me know what you think of the changes.

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Running Time: 43:39

Links:

2:15 - SharePoint Conference overview
18:00 - Top 25 SharePoint Influencers
26:23 - SharePoint 2013 Service Pack 1
31:30 - Added Workflow Manager to SharePoint 2013 Builds list
33:49 - Cannot add items to a SharePoint 2010 list created with SharePoint Designer after August 2013 CU
34:30 - How to use USB devices with your Dell Venue 8 Pro and charge it at the same time
38:54 - Surface Power Cover receives ship date and price

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ShortURL: http://www.toddklindt.com/Netcast191

  
No presence informationTodd O. Klindt3/8/2014 9:25 PMWindows 8/8.151 

Edit 6/28/14 - See this blog post for a Kickstarter project for a dock that does this.

Edit 9/26/14 - Dell released an official Data and Charging Dongle.

A couple of months ago, because of my addiction to gadgets and all things shiny, I bought a Dell Venue 8 Pro (affectionately referred to as the “DV8”). It’s an 8” tablet running a full version of Windows 8.1. You can read Paul Thurrott’s review here. It’s been a fun little mini-tablet, fitting somewhere between my Nokia 920 phone and my Surface Pro 2 in functionality. One of its biggest frustrations has been that it’s not possible to charge the DV8 and connect USB devices like a thumb drive to it. The DV8 has a single USB port, and it’s a USB OTG port. This means a single USB port is used to charge the DV8 and hook up peripherals. To charge the DV8, simply plug in any old USB charger into the USB port. Violà, it’s charging! If you want to hook any kind of USB device to it, a thumb drive, a keyboard, a rocket launcher, you need a USB OTG cable. If you have a DV8, it’s worth it to order a handful of these. They’re cheap enough, and it’s good to have one around when you need one. Unfortunately you can’t connect both, so you have to choose; juice or peripherals. Normally when I’m told something isn’t possible, I shrug my shoulders and then go off and eat some cookies. This time, I rolled up my sleeves, headed out to the Internet, and found a solution.

Before we dig in, let me be clear, I didn’t figure this out. I saw a post on a forum somewhere and ordered the cables from there. It was probably on WP Central or XDA Developers. Either way, I can’t find it now. If someone finds the post or thread, leave it in a comment below and I’ll link it up. Thanks to a comment left below, I believe the original place I saw this was on a thread on TabletReview.

The DV8 isn’t the only device with a USB OTG port. Many Android tablets and phones have one too. With the help of special splitter cables, they’re able to charge while devices are connected. Those cables alone won’t work with the DV8. There is a handshake that the DV8 does when a device is connected to the USB OTG port and the DV8 chooses to ignore devices if it sees the charger handshake. With a handful of cables and adapters we’re able to trick the DV8 into seeing the charger, then not seeing the charger. Kind of like the old “quarter behind the ear” trick I do with my kids. Here’s the pieces you’ll need:

image

#1 - USB Male to Micro USB Male Charging Data Cable w/ Switch for Samsung Galaxy Tab 3 - Black (100 CM)

#2 - CY U2-166 USB Female to Micro USB Female + Micro USB Male Adapter Cable - Black (15cm)

#3 - USB Female to Micro USB Female Adapter – Black

Deal Extreme is the only place I could find these three cables. Be warned, it took three weeks (yikes!) for me to get my cables. Together they cost less than $10, so go ahead and order them now. Sometime, right after three weeks or so I’m guessing, you’ll wish that you had.

Cable #1 has a switch to switch between Charge and Data. It’s the piece that makes this all work. When we connect this whole contraption to our DV8 it needs to be in the Charge position. The DV8 will see the Charge signal and start charging. The key is that it doesn’t continue to check for the Charge signal. After it starts charging we can flip the switch to the Data side and it will recognize any USB devices connected to #3. #2 sits between them and splits out the charging and data sides. Here are the steps:

  1. Switch the Charge / Data switch on #1 to Charge
  2. Plug the charger into the female micro USB connector on #2
  3. Plug #3 into the male micro USB connector on #2 if it’s not already
  4. Plug in the charger to the wall
  5. Plug your USB device to #3 (it should power up)
  6. Plug #1 into your DV8
  7. Verify that the DV8 is charging, if it’s not, unplug #1 from the DV8 and plug it back in
  8. Once the DV8 is charging, flip the switch on #1 to Data

Here is a picture of it all connected:

image

If you look closely you’ll see my awesome SharePoint 2007 USB drive is attached to cable #2 and the whole shebang is connected to the DV8. Here’s a screenshot to prove it’s both charging and reading my SharePoint 2007 USB drive:

image

You can hook any kind of USB device to #3, including a hub. If you use this contraption you’ll have to use a USB charger to power the USB devices. If you unplug the charger all the devices go away too. If that happens, switch #1 into Charge and plug it all back in again.

This has been one of my biggest frustrations with the Dell Venue 8 Pro. I’m glad some anonymous person on the Internet was able to find a solution. Thanks anonymous Internet person!

tk

ShortURL: http://www.toddklindt.com/ChargeDV8

Edit 3/12/2014: Added link to original thread

  
No presence informationTodd O. Klindt2/27/2014 8:40 PMNetcast0 

Tonight's session is brimming with excitement about SharePoint Conference. And I put a happy ending to the sordid tale of when I tried to buy a Lumia 520. Then I talk about some email addresses that SharePoint hates, and what's new with OneDrive and Office Web Apps. Finally I talk about the secret to how to get a busy person to respond to your emails.
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Running Time: 50:52

Links:

3:50 - SPC Blog Post
11:10 - Xbox Music Pass and Lumia 520
22:25 - Nokia Treasure Tags
24:56 - Glance update for Nokia phones
27:58 - SharePoint doesn't like + in email address for Site Collection owners
31:06 - Install OneDrive for Business client
33:20 - Office Web Apps renamed to Office Online
36:20 - Microsoft announces upcoming spring update for Windows 8.1
38:30 - How to get a busy person to respond to your email

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ShortURL: http://www.toddklindt.com/Netcast190

  
No presence informationTodd O. Klindt2/23/2014 9:31 PMSharepoint2 

I can’t believe it’s almost here. Less than a week to SPC. To help you all (and honestly myself) keep track of where I’ll be and when I’ll be there I put my schedule in this blog post. As I get more things nailed down I’ll edit this post. You can also put the sessions in your calendar on MySPC. Don’t forget you can also set up meetings in MySPC. I’m going to be fairly busy, but I’ll try to accept meetings if I get some requests. I’ll also be hanging out in the Rackspace booth, booth 108, so be sure to swing by there. We’ve got some cool games and giveaways. You won’t want to miss it. And as always, if you see me wandering around, don’t at all be afraid to come up and introduce yourself and say, “Hi.” I’m pretty friendly. Smile

Sunday March 2nd

Pre-Conference session – PRE009 - Installing and Configuring SharePoint 2013 (Room TBD)

7:15 PM – 7:30 PM – Just chatting about Workflow at the Nintex booth (Booth 635)

Tuesday, March 4th

10:45 AM - 12:00 PM  - SPC381 - Load testing SharePoint 2013 using Visual Studio 2013 (Bellini 2001-2106)

You’ve built your SharePoint 2013 farm and gotten it configured just how you want it. But how do you know if it can stand up to the load your users are going to throw at it? In this session we’ll show you how to use Visual Studio 2013 to load test your SharePoint farm. We’ll show you how to bring your farm to its knees to find out where your farm’s limitations are before your users do. Then we’ll show you what changes to make your farm scale higher and knee-buckle free.

Wednesday, March 5th

8:00 Netcast Hooligan Breakfast (Conference Breakfast)

We'll meet outside the breakfast hall around 8:00 and grab some breakfast together.

1:45 PM - 3:00 PM – SPC367 - Using Windows PowerShell with SharePoint 2013 and SharePoint Online (Titian 2201-2306)

Forget dogs, PowerShell is a SharePoint admin’s best friend. PowerShell lets us to do our everyday tasks faster and with less error. It also lets us do things we’d never dreamed of before. Get a brief overview of PowerShell, then dig in to some PowerShell scripts you can take home and use on your farm.

5:00 PM - 6:15 PM – SPC410 - The nuts and bolts of upgrading to SharePoint 2013  (Bellini 2001-2106)

Have you heard all your SharePoint Admin friends talk about how great SharePoint 2013 is, yet your farm is still running at SharePoint 2010, or even worse, SharePoint 2007? Then this session is for you. In this session Todd and Shane will go over the upgrade strategies to SharePoint 2013. Then they’ll dig into some fun stories about how they’ve done battle upgrading SharePoint so that you won’t have to. There will be lots of tips, and lots of fun, and in the end you’ll be ready for anything the upgrade to SharePoint 2013 can throw at you.

 

I’m also hoping to do a live recording of my Netcast there. When I get that timeslot I’ll update this post.

tk

ShortURL: http://www.toddklindt.com/SPC14Sched

  
No presence informationTodd O. Klindt2/23/2014 8:42 PMNetcast0 

In this nearly hour-long episode I'm all over the place. I start out talking about some plans for the upcoming SharePoint Conference. Then I talk about some SharePoint 2010 topics, like how to implement it in an extranet, and how to use it with SSL. Then I talk about a tool you can use to help improve the battery life of your tablet. I finish up with what is coming in the next version of Windows Phone. 
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Running Time: 54:34

Links:

2:56 - Pay Ustream $4 to get rid of ads
5:43 - SharePoint PowerHour
9:50 - Myspc is live
13:18 - Lumia 520 debacle
16:50 - Best practices for extranet environments (SharePoint Server 2010)
18:55 - Require SSL for Web application is not supported for SharePoint 2010
22:38 - Build 1005 vs 1001 version question
25:15 - OWA patch
27:26 - Getting the Product Version for SharePoint Online
29:22 - Autoruns for Windows
34:30 - New feature list for Windows Phone 8.1
41:49 - Play to DLNA
43:20 - Kickstarter hacked

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ShortURL: http://www.toddklindt.com/Netcast189

  
No presence informationTodd O. Klindt2/13/2014 10:06 PMNetcast0 

In tonight's Netcast I discuss how we now get to patch AppFabric. Weee!! We follow that up with a rousing discussion about the SharePoint Configuration Cache and all the fun things it does. While I love PowerShell to death, sometimes it needs a little extra work. We talk tonight about how you need to take an extra step if you create your site collections with it. I finish up with an inspirational blog post about being an imposter.

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Running Time: 45:30

Links:

6:25 - SharePoint Client Browser
9:40 - AppFabric (Distributed Cache) Can Be Patched on its on in SharePoint 2013
16:46 - Download Fiddler
21:10 - What is the SharePoint Configuration Cache?
27:00 - Creating a Site Collection in PowerShell does not create the default groups
30:30 - Latest SharePoint publications
31:54 - Latest Downloads from Microsoft
33:00 - Everyone Has Imposter Syndrome Except For You

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ShortURL: http://www.toddklindt.com/Netcast188

  
No presence informationTodd O. Klindt2/11/2014 9:18 PMSharePoint 20130 

Patching SharePoint is one of those things I enjoy. The excitement of unwrapping a brand new SharePoint patch is second only to getting a new tie or socks on Christmas morning. When I heard this news I just had to share it with you all. We get to patch AppFabric now! Hurray!

SharePoint 2013 introduced some new functionality, the Distributed Cache. Simply put, the Distributed Cache is a service that caches things like authentication tokens and social newsfeeds, stuff like that. The whole list is in this TechNet article. The process that does this is a product called AppFabric, and it’s installed and configured when you run the SharePoint 2013 Prereq installer. AppFabric is a standalone product, but it’s best to let SharePoint handle the installation and configuration. The Distributed Cache took a page out of the User Profile Service’s book. It can be very fussy when it’s angry.

When SharePoint 2013 first came out we were given strict instructions by Microsoft not to fool with the AppFabric pieces of the Distributed Cache. We might fancy ourselves AppFabric experts, but SharePoint wants it a very particular way, so we should use SharePoint tools to interact with that. That included patching. We were told even if an AppFabric patch knocked on our door and asked us nicely to install it, even if it used Sir or Ma’am, we were to say no. We were to let the SharePoint patches take care of patching AppFabric and the Distributed Cache.

Until now.

Recently Microsoft reversed its position on SharePoint administrators patching AppFabric. Not only are we now allowed to patch AppFabric, it’s actually recommended that we patch it to at least CU4. I haven’t installed this patch myself, but I’m sure it goes on smooth like butter. Smile

tk

http://www.toddklindt.com/PatchAppFabric

  
No presence informationTodd O. Klindt2/6/2014 9:23 PMNetcast0 

I lead off tonight's netcast with the stunning, sad, news that InfoPath is officially dead. After spending some time commiserating about its demise we move on to happier topics like a new update for Lumia 920 owners, and a way to get a free Lumia 520. Then I talk about the Dell Venue 8 Pro and traveling with it. I also talk about ways to get more battery life out of your Windows tablets. I end with talking about my amazing SharePoint Conference promotional videos. Oscar committee, are you listening?

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Running Time: 46:40

Links:

3:43 - InfoPath is dead
15:30 - Black update is out for Lumia 920 users
19:07 - Free Lumia 500 with Xbox Music Pass
23:30 - Living Small by Mike Ganotti
25:30 - Keyboard case
31:20 - Maximize Battery Life for Surface Pro
35:40 - Surface Pro - 128GB for $500
37:10 - Folders or Metadata
39:50 - SPC2014 Promotional videos

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ShortURL: http://www.toddklindt.com/Netcast187

  
No presence informationTodd O. Klindt2/4/2014 2:57 PM0 

I’m very fortunate that I’ve been asked to present a few sessions at SPC2014 next month. As part of the marketing effort for SPC Microsoft asked the speakers to create a quick video to promote each session and tell attendees what it’s about. They made the mistake of telling us to have fun. When Shane and I see that we’re supposed to have fun making a video we sort of lose track of what the real purpose of the video is. This is another case of that. Below are the three videos we made.

Part 1 – The Beginning

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SPC #381 - Load Testing SharePoint with Visual Studio

Part 2 – The Sequel

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SPC #410–The Nuts and Bolts of Upgrading to SharePoint 2013

Part 3 – The stunning conclusion

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SPC #367 - Using Windows PowerShell with SharePoint 2013 and SharePoint Online

There you have it. Feel free to bookmark those, show them to your friends, Rickroll people with them, whatever. I hope to see you at SPC. Don’t forget to check all the videos at the SharePoint at Rackspace channel on YouTube. I promise every single one of them are better than these three.

tk

ShortURL: http://www.toddklindt.com/SPC14Videos

  
No presence informationTodd O. Klindt1/29/2014 10:30 PMNetcast0 

Tonight's netcast opens with an introduction to SkyDrive's new name, OneDrive. We talk about how that will impact SharePoint. Next I talk about a question I got on my web site about warm up scripts. Then I talk about a workaround for a bug with the Performance Point Designer. Then we start talking about my second love, PowerShell. I share a PowerShell script I use to tag my Netcast MP3 files. I follow that up with a blog post on exporting Search settings with PowerShell. I finish it up by talking about how to use PowerShell to copy list from one SharePoint web to another.

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Running Time: 42:51

Links:

5:10 - SkyDrive renamed to OneDrive

8:23 - Warm up scripts

11:08 - Trevor Seward's blog post on the ISS Warm up module

12:01 - Fix for KB2825647 released and verified

14:00 - Editing MP3 tags with PowerShell

24:25 - Changing the name of the Netcast

27:30 - PowerShell function to export mappings and crawled / managed properties

29:15 - Copy lists in PowerShell

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ShortURL: http://www.toddklindt.com/Netcast186

  
No presence informationTodd O. Klindt1/27/2014 7:37 PMNetcast0 

In tonight's episode I start out by showing how incredibly generous my Netcast listeners are. They raised a huge amount of money for one of my favorite charities. So I love on them for a while. Then I talk about what you can and cannot do to your SharePoint databases in SQL. Finally I talk about two non SharePoint topics. First I give a quick review of the Dell Venue 8 Pro 8" Windows tablet. Then I finish up talking about the Bose Quiet Comfort 20 headphones I recently bought.

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Running Time: 53:36

Links:

17:50 - Rack Gives Back

19:11 -  Support for changes to the databases that are used by Office server products and by Windows SharePoint Services

26:10 – Installing SQL for SharePoint – Part 1

26:13 – Configuring SQL for SharePoint – Part 2

27:00 - Disable MySites in SharePoint 2010

34:15 - Dell Venue 8 Pro

46:30 - Bose QC20 Headphones

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ShortURL: http://www.toddklindt.com/Netcast185

  
No presence informationTodd O. Klindt1/24/2014 2:11 PMPowerShell1 

As most of you know, I do a wildly successfully weekly SharePoint Netcast. Not only am I the star, I’m also the writer, director, producer, and janitor. As the years have gone by I’ve tried to improve the Netcast, but that almost always means I spend more time producing it. Because of that I’ve tried automate as much of the production as I can. One  piece of that is putting all the tags on the MP3 files. The program I use to produce my Netcast, Camtasia, is fantastic, absolutely fantastic. But it doesn’t tag the MP3 files it produces. Windows will let you manually tag the text fields of an MP3 file in Explorer, but you can’t add cover art that way. I’m way too pretty to not be on the cover art of my MP3. So I have had to import the MP3 into Windows Media Player and add the cover art that way. Awfully labor intensive. I’m way too lazy for all that. Time to bring out the big guns, PowerShell.

I spent some time trying to find a way to edit MP3 tags in PowerShell natively. I was surprised that I couldn’t find one. Fortunately PowerShell can wedge its way into all kinds of places. I was able to find a library, Taglib, that did the job. It allowed me to easily add both the text and picture information I needed. Here’s roughly the code I used to tag the MP3 for Netcast 185.

# Load the assembly. I used a relative path so I could off using the Resolve-Path cmdlet
[Reflection.Assembly]::LoadFrom( (Resolve-Path "..\Common\taglib-sharp.dll"))

# Load up the MP3 file. Again, I used a relative path, but an absolute path works too
$media = [TagLib.File]::Create((resolve-path ".\Netcast 185 - Growing Old with Todd.mp3"))

# set the tags
$media.Tag.Album = "Todd Klindt's SharePoint Netcast"
$media.Tag.Year = "2014"
$media.Tag.Title = "Netcast 185 - Growing Old with Todd"
$media.Tag.Track = "185"
$media.Tag.AlbumArtists = "Todd Klindt"
$media.Tag.Comment = "http://www.toddklindt.com/blog"

# Load up the picture and set it
$pic = [taglib.picture]::createfrompath("c:\Dropbox\Netcasts\Todd Netcast 1 - 480.jpg")
$media.Tag.Pictures = $pic

# Save the file back
$media.Save()

I’m only setting a few properties, but there are many more. To get the full list of properties you can get and set, issue this command:

$media.tag | Get-Member

Most, but not all, of the properties can be written to. Here are a couple of properties to compare:

Grouping                   Property   string Grouping {get;set;}
IsEmpty                    Property   bool IsEmpty {get;}

Properties with only a “get” in their definition, like “IsEmpty” are read-only. You can only get them. Properties that have both “get” and “set,” like “Grouping” are read and write. That’s not something that’s specific to taglib or MP3 files, that’s a PowerShell thing.

Once you’ve set whichever properties you want to set, use the .Save() method to write those changes back to your MP3 file. I’m using this weekly to tag a single file, but this could just as easily be used to bulk tag (or retag) MP3s, or move MP3s around based on information in their properties.

Enjoy. Leave a comment below if you use this in an interesting way.

tk

ShortURL: http://www.toddklindt.com/MP3TagswithPowerShell

  
No presence informationTodd O. Klindt1/23/2014 9:02 PMNetcast0 

In tonight's episode I discuss some decidedly non-technical things. I spent the first part of the show talking about my experience at the New Media Expo last week. I talk about a few things I learned there that I might just incorporate into this very netcast. Then I talk about some rebranding that will be going on. Then I sweeten the pot some to entice folks to donate to my birthday cause.

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Running Time: 48:02

Links:

01:41 – Laura’s Youtube channel

12:56 - Audacity

16:10 - Penn Gillette’s crowdsourced movie, Director’s Cut

20:04 - Scott Stratten’s website

20:04 – QR Codes Kill Kittens

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ShortURL: http://www.toddklindt.com/Netcast184

  
No presence informationTodd O. Klindt1/6/2014 4:55 PMSharePoint 2013; SQL1 

Hot on the heels of my award-winning, life-changing, awe-inspiring article, Set Up SQL Server 2012 as a SharePoint 2013 Database Server, comes parts 2 and 3 at SharePoint Pro Mag. If there was a story that demanded a sequel, this is it. Now, if you haven’t read part 1 yet, go ahead and get caught up. You don’t want to start in the middle of the story. You need to know who the characters are, and what our protagonist's motivations are, what the exotic locations are, what is the McGuffin, etc. The story in part 2 picks up right where part 1 ends, so you’ll need to be up to speed.

Here are the sequels and their links:

Part 2: Configure SQL Server 2012 for SharePoint 2013

Part 3: Fine-Tune Your SQL Server 2012 Configuration for SharePoint 2013

Please do tweet, share, link, and tattoo the link so the nice folks at SharePointProMag will let me write more articles for them. It’ll take more than just my mom making one of those articles her homepage for them to keep asking me to come back.

And if you have any questions, comments, or are just lonely, leave a comment on the article, or here on this blog post.

Thanks,

tk

ShortURL: http://www.toddklindt.com/SetUpSQL2013Pt2

  
No presence informationTodd O. Klindt1/2/2014 5:04 PMNetcast0 

In this last netcast of 2013 I get introspective and talk about some of the fun things that have happened in the last year. After we move past the nostalgia I finally make good on my promise to add the Office Web App patches to my SharePoint 2013 builds list. Then I talk about some changes made to the SharePoint 2013 patches that impact how we'll download and install them. I finish up with a couple of user information topics and a quick review of the Dell Venue 8 Pro.

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Running Time: 48:29

Links:

03:19 - 2013 Year in Review

05:00 - Ustream Channel

06:38 - Netcast YouTube Channel

07:58 - Me on Windows Weekly

13:15 - Hey Scripting Guy posts in October and December

15:15 - My Windows Phone App

19:25 - Office Web App build numbers and links to 2013 build page (Twitter feed)

22:25 - Dec 2013 patching changes

27:31 - Bug for 2013 User Profiles and 2 HTML fields

29:35 - User Information List Sync for Foundation

33:10 - Project Sienna

35:45 - I got a Dell Venue 8 Pro

43:13 - Rafael Rivera (blog | Twitter)

Charity drive for birthday email address, gowinl@bellsouth.net
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No presence informationTodd O. Klindt1/1/2014 12:06 PMSharePoint 20130 

For the last few years I’ve tried to keep up with the patches released for SharePoint 2010 and SharePoint 2013. Some days it feels like a full time job. This December had one of those days.

Patching got substantially easier when SharePoint 2010 came out. Patching SharePoint 2007 had some pitfalls, and patching SharePoint 2003 was downright confusing. It was not for people with weak hearts. For the most part, all the problems went away in SharePoint 2010. The biggest improvement was the introduction of the single file upgrades. What that meant was regardless of which SharePoint product you were using; Foundation, Server, or Project Server, you installed one patch and that was it. In SharePoint 2007 if you had MOSS you had to install the WSS patch and then the MOSS patch, and there were no errors if you didn’t. The first indication you got that something was wrong was MOSS being broken after the patch was installed. That was just not soon enough for most folks. Some people are really impatient.

Like I said, SharePoint 2010 fixed all that. Regardless of your version of SharePoint 2010, you downloaded one file and you were done. That spectacularness carried over to SharePoint 2013. For both versions you could go to either my SharePoint 2010 Builds page or the SharePoint 2013 Builds page and grab the file you needed. Life was good.

Then came “The Big Patch Rejiggering of December 2013.” Starting in December 2013, the patches for SharePoint 2013 are no longer a single file for each product. There have been two important changes:

1) SharePoint Server patch is now two files and you need them both. Microsoft published a KB article explaining the change. When you go to the download page you see this:

image

You need to download both files and extract them in the same directory to successfully install the CU. The reason given for this is because the size of the patch has gotten too large for one file. The first file is 441 MB and the second file is 1.717 GB. Together they exceed that magical number of 2 GB, which I’m guessing is the boundary. The October 2013 CU was 2144916952 bytes which comes out to 1.997 GB after you divide by 1024 a couple of times. Currently the largest SharePoint 2010 CU (December 2013 CU for Project Server) clocks in at a modest 1.2 GBs, so it’ll be a while until we have a problem there.

2) Project Server has been demoted from Cumulative Update to Hotfix. With SharePoint 2010, and SharePoint 2013 August 2013 and earlier, there was a separate CU for Project Server, and it contained the Foundation and Server components along with the Project components. October 2013 did not have a Project Server CU. The SharePoint Server CU was 1.997 GBs, so I’m guessing they couldn’t make a Project Server CU under 2 GB. Starting in December 2013 Project Server is a Hotfix that must installed in addition to the SharePoint Server CU. The December 2013 Project Server 2013 Hotfix requires the Project Server component be at at least the March 2013 PU level. After your farm is at that level you can install the December 2013 Project Server hotfix with or without the December 2013 SharePoint Server CU, though I’d recommend you keep them in sync. It doesn’t seem to matter which one you install first.

I hope that clears up the changes in the SharePoint 2013 patches. If you have any questions, leave a comment below.

tk

ShortURL: http://www.toddklindt.com/December2013CUChanges

  
No presence informationTodd O. Klindt12/23/2013 2:45 PMSQL; SharePoint 2013; Sharepoint1 

I do a lot of sessions on how to install and configure SharePoint 2013, and for the most part they go over pretty well. I recently did that talk in Sweden at SEF and was asked by a member of the audience what I had done to get my SQL server ready for SharePoint. I thought that would make an outstanding blog post. Thanks anonymous SEF attendee! Smile  As I started putting pen to paper and scribbling this out I realized it was going to be quite long. After I got it finished it was too long for a blog post. It looked more like…a magazine article. I reached out to my friend Caroline Marwitz (Twitter) over at SharePoint Pro Magazine to see if it was something she was interested in. She was! It’s a Christmas miracle!

Last week she published the first installment of the series. I went above on and beyond for her. Not only did a write an excellent article (well, as excellent as I can) but I also recorded a video of me walking through the same process. You can read the article, watch the video, or both! What a country! So head on over to my article at SharePointProMag.com and see what all the fuss is about. If you like it, leave a comment so Caroline will let me publish more stuff in the future. Smile

There will be a part 2, and maybe even a part 3, so bookmark the article so you can rush back to it to see how the story ends.

tk

ShortURL: http://www.toddklindt.com/SetUpSQL2013Pt1

  
No presence informationTodd O. Klindt12/20/2013 5:17 PMNetcast0 

This week's Netcast starts off with a long discussion on Windows Phone 8 and Windows 8.1 tablets. Then I chat about some new cumulative updates for our favorite SharePoint server products. Then, for a change, I talk about an important client side patch. I spend the rest of my time talking about SQL Server and how best to lay out your drives.

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Running Time: 49:49

Links:

02:35 - Download my Windows Phone 8 app

13:15 - http://withinwindows.com

16:43 - http://www.toddklindt.com/SP2010Dec13CU

16:55  - http://www.toddklindt.com/SP2013Dec13CU

20:20 - Office Client Patch MS13-104

31:40 - SQLskills.com tempdb posts

33:10 - http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/cc298801.aspx

37:38 - SQL virtualization video from Brent Ozar

41:30 – Trevor Seward’s blobcache project

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ShortURL: http://www.toddklindt.com/Netcast182

  
No presence informationTodd O. Klindt12/13/2013 10:01 PMNetcast0 

This week's netcast is full of all kinds of great PowerShell content, with a little SharePoint sprinkled in for good measure. I start things off my showing off my shiny new Windows Phone app. Take that, iPhone! The killer app for Windows Phone has arrived! Then I talk about how you can use PowerShell to figure out where an account is being locked out. Then again I talk about Russ Maxwell's patch installation script. Then I talk about some issues with a couple of SharePoint patches. I know, shocking!

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Running Time: 39:42

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3:38 - Download my Windows Phone 8 app
7:22 - Free Ebook: Hybrid Cloud Management with System Center 2012 R2 App Controller
11:50 - SharePoint 2013 Search Query Tool
15:40 - Create and import a thesaurus in SharePoint Server 2013
22:30 - Best practices for crawling in SharePoint Server 2013

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ShortURL: http://www.toddklindt.com/Netcast181

  
No presence informationTodd O. Klindt12/6/2013 4:51 PMNetcast0 

This week's netcast is full of all kinds of great PowerShell content, with a little SharePoint sprinkled in for good measure. I start things off my showing off my shiny new Windows Phone app. Take that, iPhone! The killer app for Windows Phone has arrived! Then I talk about how you can use PowerShell to figure out where an account is being locked out. Then again I talk about Russ Maxwell's patch installation script. Then I talk about some issues with a couple of SharePoint patches. I know, shocking!

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Running Time: 37:58

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5:34 – Windows Phone 8 App
11:05 - PowerShell Script to Determine What Device is Locking Out an Active Directory User Account
13:35 - Russ max patch script
17:52 - Security hardening for SharePoint 2010 farms (PowerShell)
19:18 - PowerTips Reference Library
22:37 - PerformancePoint Designer won’t start after applying the SP2013 October CU

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ShortURL: http://www.toddklindt.com/Netcast180

  
No presence informationTodd O. Klindt12/3/2013 4:30 PMSharePoint 2013; Windows 8/8.13 

Last week I was talking to Bill Baer, (blog | Twitter) my BFF and Senior Technical Product Manager for SharePoint at Microsoft. We were chatting about fun things like muscle cars, schnitzel, and how awesome Iowa is. I’d recently been asked by a couple of customers if SharePoint 2013 supported being installed on a Server Core installation of Windows. For those of you that haven’t played with this yet, it’s a minimal installation of Windows Server. The idea is that the fewer things you have running on Windows the fewer resources it will take, the less you’ll have to patch, and the fewer places the bad guys will have to attack your server. Everybody wins except the bad guys.

And SharePoint.

The SharePoint 2013 Hardware and Software Requirements document doesn’t explicitly spell out if SharePoint will work with a Server Core installation. Bill broke the bad news to me gently, SharePoint 2013 doesn’t support this. It doesn’t support being installed on Server Core and it doesn’t support running on Server Core after installation. SharePoint needs the whole Windows Enchilada.

Don’t be mad at Bill. He’s normally a very nice guy.

tk

ShortURL: http://www.toddklindt.com/NoServerCoreForSharePoint

  
No presence informationTodd O. Klindt12/2/2013 1:23 PMNetcast0 

Tonight's episode covers the gamut of emotions. There is happiness, sadness, intrigue, the whole deal. I talk about how to use Fiddler to up your troubleshooting game and some problems I had with replication and SQL server.

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Running Time: 43:25

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00:00 - Welcome
2:45 - Service Pack 1 for SharePoint 2013 is on its way
17:08 – Get Fiddler


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ShortURL: http://www.toddklindt.com/Netcast179

  
No presence informationTodd O. Klindt11/23/2013 1:29 PM0 

Sometimes email can be a real drag. It can be people wanting you to do work. Or maybe it’s another Nigerian Prince needing my help getting money out of the country. You just never know what you’re going to find when you open the old inbox.

Friday was a good day though. Friday morning I saw an email with this subject line:

SharePoint Conference 2014: Content Suggestion Accepted

I was a little leery. I was afraid it was Shane pulling a prank on me, like that time he sent me an email saying I’d won the lottery. After a quick read though, I realized it was legitimate. I had not one, not two, but three sessions accepted for the SharePoint Conference in March. That’s the good news. The bad news it that you’ll have to put up with Shane during the sessions too.

Here is the full list of what we’ll be doing. As the abstracts and schedules become public I’ll update all that.

Precon: SharePoint 2013 Deployment and Administration End--To-End

Session: Load testing SharePoint 2013 using Visual Studio 2013

Session: The nuts and bolts of upgrading to SharePoint 2013

Session: Using Windows PowerShell with SharePoint 2013 and SharePoint Online

I’m also going to try to record my Netcast live some time during show. If you want to be in the audience for that keep your eyes out for those details. I’ll also try to get involved with anything else I can. Smile

If you’re going to be at SPC please find me and say Hi. I’m a pretty friendly guy.

tk

ShortUrl: http://www.toddklindt.com/SPC2014

  
No presence informationTodd O. Klindt11/21/2013 10:37 PMNetcast0 

In tonight's episode I demystify SharePoint administrative permission, Da Vinci Code style.  Then I talk about Host Named Site Collections and how they can trip up users and make them log more times than they want to. Which is any. Next we chat about a content type bug that popped into the March 2013 PU for SharePoint 2013. Then I show you how to strip that fancy UI off of a Windows Server 2012 using PowerShell.

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Running Time: 43:57

Links:

00:00 - Welcome
00:32 - Sharepoint.Rackspace.com
02:38 - Demystifying SharePoint Administration Permissions
13:39 - Local columns not associated with Content Types
21:40 - SharePointproMag.com
24:39 - SQL Resources

  1. Securing SharePoint: Harden SQL Server in SharePoint Environments
  2. Best practices for SQL Server in a SharePoint Server farm
  3. Overview of SQL Server in a SharePoint environment (SharePoint 2013)
  4. Storage and SQL Server capacity planning and configuration (SharePoint Server 2013)

30:25 - Glance with background
40:02 Charity drive for birthday email address, gowinl@bellsouth.net

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ShortURL: http://www.toddklindt.com/Netcast178

  
No presence informationTodd O. Klindt11/15/2013 9:24 PMNetcast0 

Tonight's Netcast covers the much requested topic of the Distributed Cache. I explain why we need it, then all the ways it's going to try to bite you. I also talk about some challenges you might have if your SharePoint server doesn't have access to the Internet. I wrap it up by discussing some free Windows Server 2012 R2 resources, and how to find your Windows Phone if you lose it.

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Running Time: 43:57

Links:

04:10 Hey Scripting Guy blog post
07:53 Distributed Cache
27:05 Site Slowness due to SharePoint STS Certificate CRL Checking
30:13 Slipstream still works for Patching during installs
31:19 Workflow Complexity Limit
34:13 Free ebook: Introducing Windows Server 2012 R2 Technical Overview
34:47 Windows Phone - Find My Phone

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ShortURL: http://www.toddklindt.com/Netcast177

  
No presence informationTodd O. Klindt11/14/2013 10:08 PMSharePoint 2010; SharePoint 2013; PowerShell0 

Recently I’ve gotten a couple of questions about how or where to apply administrative permissions in SharePoint. In a couple of cases someone has come to me after giving an account some permissions but it still couldn’t do what they needed. I’ve pointed people to my How to create a SharePoint 2010 admin account and stop using sp_farm blog post for some guidance. That blog post is more about the “how” and less about the “why.” So in this blog post I’m going to try to map out the “why.”

Again, this blog post is just about Farm Administrator permissions. It won’t cover any end user stuff. That stuff’s just confusing! It will cover four areas where server admin types can be given permission, and when that permission will work. Let’s dig in.

Web Application Policy

How Do You Give It?

In Central Admin > Manage Web Applications > Policy for Users

When does it work?

Only when the user is accessing SharePoint with a web browser through the web app’s URL, i.e. Internet Explorer pointed at http://portal.contoso.com

Why does it only work then?

That permission is telling the web app’s app pool to authorize that account to the URL in question. The app pool then accesses SharePoint on that user’s behalf like any other web request.

Farm Administrators in Central Admin

How do you give it?

In Central Admin > Security > Farm Administrators

When does it work?

When the user tries to log in to Central Admin

Why does it only work then?

The Farm Administrators is just a SharePoint group that gives a user permission to log in to Central Admin, it functions just like SharePoint groups do in any site collection. The Central Admin app pool (the Farm Account) then accesses SharePoint on that user’s behalf like any other web request. In a few cases like creating new web apps the user must also be a local admin.

 

SPShellAdmin

How do you give it?

From PowerShell with the Add-SPShellAdmin cmdlet.

When does it work?

  • When accessing SharePoint via PowerShell on the SharePoint server.
  • When accessing SharePoint via the object model in code on the SharePoint server
  • When using STSADM (blech!)

Why does it only work then?

It’s giving that account permissions directly to the SharePoint objects

  • SQL databases
  • Local machine permissions and resources

Any code or PowerShell executed runs as the user’s identity, not another account like above. These local permissions require direct access to the box to use, so they are more safe than methods that work remotely. If the user needs remote permissions they should use one of the methods above.

Service App Administrator

How do you give it?

Central Admin > Service Application Management. Highlight the service application and click “Administrators" in the ribbon. Add the user to the Administrators list.

When does it work?

When the service application administrator logs in to Central Admin.

Why does it only work then?

When a user is added as an administrator for a service application they are added to a SharePoint group in Central Admin called “Delegated Administrators.” This gives them permission to log in to Central Admin. Central Admin authorizes them to log in and gives them access to the service application they’ve been given access to. The Central Admin app pool (the Farm Account) then accesses SharePoint on that user’s behalf like any other web request.

 

I hope that clears up some of the confusion on why there are so many places you have to give administrators permissions.

tk

ShortURL: http://www.toddklindt.com/AdminPermissions

  
No presence informationTodd O. Klindt11/13/2013 7:22 PMNetcast0 

This week's Netcast start out with me explaining what's wrong with this week's Netcast. Fun for everyone. Then I spend a little bit of time talking about some Netcast Hooligans that I saw last week. Next I cover some fun PowerShell stuff and a developery thing that was introduced in a recent SharePoint 2013 CU. Speaking of CUs, I talk about some exciting changes to Search that were introduced in the SharePoint 2013 October 2013 CU. Finally I talk about my new Surface Pro 2 and how I'm not smart enough for it.

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Running Time: 43:57

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Metadata endpoint for SharePoint 2013 REST

Software boundaries and limitations document

Surface Pro 2

Dual monitor Plugable Dock

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ShortURL: http://www.toddklindt.com/Netcast176

  
No presence informationTodd O. Klindt11/9/2013 10:03 AMPowerShell; SharePoint 20130 

I’m very honored to have a blog post posted on the Hey Scripting Guy! blog. Today Ed posted my “Use PowerShell to Back Up SharePoint Installation” post. Please check it out and leave any comments if you have questions.

tk

ShortURL: http://www.toddklindt.com/BackupSharePointwithPowerShell

  
No presence informationTodd O. Klindt11/3/2013 1:20 PMNetcast2 

This week I start things off by debuting Rackspace's new Facebook page. Next I cover a PowerShell cmdlet that my team uses to help with SharePoint upgrades. Then I talk a little about the ongoing roll out of the October 2013 CUs. Then I touch on some SQL Server security changes you can make, and how you can make your SharePoint site more SEO friendly. Finally I talk about a weird CSS issue in SharePoint 2013 apps.

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Running Time: 41:09

Links:

4:05 - SharePoint at Rackspace Facebook Page

5:52- New Media Expo

9:49- Time Operations in PowerShell with Measure-Command

15:19- SharePoint Server 2013 October 2013 CU Notes

15:30- SharePoint 2013 Builds

15:55- SharePoint 2013 Patches on Twitter

17:35- Securing SharePoint: Harden SQL Server in SharePoint Environments

22:30- Optimizing SharePoint Server 2013 websites for Internet search engines

26:28- Google Trend comparison

29:33- SharePoint 2013 Apps do not load CSS properly 403

32:18- Microsoft Cloud Show

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ShortURL: http://www.toddklindt.com/Netcast175

Edited 11/8/2013 to fix all the broken links. Yeesh!

  
No presence informationTodd O. Klindt10/25/2013 10:26 PMPowerShell; SharePoint 20133 

A couple of days ago I got an IM from a coworker asking me some upgrade questions. They were working in a test environment practicing everything before the Production upgrade. One of the questions was “Is there a way to see how long the mount-spcontentdatabase took?” I was so proud that they were testing things and timing things that I had to wipe a tear from my eye.

There are a couple of ways to skin this cat, but the first thing that jumped into my head was Measure-Command. Measure-Command is a cmdlet that measures how long it takes a scriptblock or a script to run. If you ever ran the old timethis.exe from the NT Resource Kit then you know what this is like. In this particular case the usage would look like this:

Measure-Command { Mount-SPContentDatabase –Name wss_content_portal –WebApplication http://portal.contoso.com }

If the Transcript is on (and it always should be, in my opinion) all the time information written out by Measure-Command will be in it, so it’ll be easy to find later on. The output from Measure-Command is a TimeSpan object so it has some obvious properties like Hour, Minute, Second, etc, so it’s easy to tailor the output to look however you want.

You can use this command the way my coworker did, to measure how long a command or script takes to execute. This could be testing the steps of an upgrade, or any other important task, like mass creation of site collections. Anything where you’ll need to provide management with time estimates. When you get better with PowerShell you’ll find there are often multiple ways to do the same task, especially when you start looping through objects and making decisions. When faced with multiple ways to do something it can often be tough to decide which way is best. I used to be a fan of just flipping a coin, or doing it the PowerShell way; “head”,”tails” | Get-Random. (PowerShell really likes “heads”) Now with Measure-Command we can see how long each way takes and let that help us figure out which method to use.

Hopefully that helps some of you budget how long things will take

tk

ShortURL: http://www.toddklindt.com/MeasureCommand

  
No presence informationTodd O. Klindt10/25/2013 8:51 PMNetcast0 

In tonight's episode I tell a scary tale of Search issue I encountered last week. I share my troubleshooting steps and the solution. Continuing my tradition of talking about PowerShell I cover how to do powerful pings in PowerShell.  Next I talk a little about the Windows 8.1 update and my experiences with it. I wrap things up by raving a bit about TechSmith's SnagIt and a couple of blog posts I'm working on.

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Running Time: 42:51

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32:50  - Techsmith SnagIt

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ShortURL: http://www.toddklindt.com/Netcast174

  
No presence informationTodd O. Klindt10/21/2013 9:28 AMSharePoint 2013; Netcast0 

I started tonight's netcast with a couple of riveting Search topics. One on how to get all the items in your Index and the other is about exporting out Managed Properties. Next I should you how to put a cool red maintenance bar in your site collections if you need to. Then I break in to some fun non-SharePoint topics. The SQL 2014 CTP is out and I tell you how to get it. Then I talk about virtualizing SQL and how you can do it without killing SharePoint. Finally I talk about a new update for Windows Phone 8.

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Running Time: 43:44

Links:

04:00 - Return all items in the search index
12:40 - SharePoint 2013 Maintenance Window Notifications
13:00 - SharePoint 2013 Maintenance Window in Central Admin
18:00 - SQL 2014 CTP2 download
19:00 – SharePoint 2010 Builds
19:00 – SharePoint 2013 Builds
21:43 - Overview of farm virtualization and architectures for SharePoint 2013
22:00 - Brent Ozar's SQL Virtualization video
26:40 - Free ebook: Introducing Windows 8.1 for IT Professionals
28:20 - Get GDR3 for your Windows phone

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ShortURL: http://www.toddklindt.com/Netcast173

  
No presence informationTodd O. Klindt10/11/2013 2:14 PMNetcast0 

Tonight's Netcast starts out with me being all giddy that the Hey Scripting Guy blog published something of mine. I'm printing it out and hanging it up on the fridge. Then I talk about the awesome time I had in Stockholm and Helsinki last week. Search was a problem for one of my customers last week and I tell you all why. I also point out a handy map with all the ports and protocols used between servers in a SharePoint farm. Then I end the Netcast with a PowerShell tip for using Where-Object, some Internet Patches you should install, and how to get Facebook to work correctly on Surface RT.

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Running Time: 40:31

Links:

03:01 - Hey Scripting Guy post
06:12  - SEF 2013
22:55  - No Results in search - Permissions issues
25:21  - Ports needed for ports and protocols in SharePoint
26:52  - Where-Object Post
30:57  - Patch Tuesday - will include a patch for IE !
31:58  - Fix for Facebook forcing to mobile site for Surface RT
34:28  - SharePoint Conference 2014
36:50  - SPTechCon
38:42 – Winter Scripting Games

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ShortURL: http://www.toddklindt.com/Netcast172

  
No presence informationTodd O. Klindt10/4/2013 10:05 PMNetcast; PowerShell; SharePoint 20130 

Another supersized Netcast. I spread the good news that I'll be presenting at the Microsoft SharePoint Conference in March of 2014. I talk about the PowerShell Summit, which I will sadly not be able to attend. I bring more bad news when I cover the supportability of SharePoint 2013 on Windows 2012 R2. Then we cover those pesky DCOM errors and how to quickly, easily put your SharePoint site in maintenance mode. I've had a couple of run-ins with SQL Server in the past week, so I cover those gotchas. I finish up the Netcast lusting over the new Surface devices that Microsoft recently announced.

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Running Time: 43:56

Links:

01:13 Production Notes
06:34 Upgrading Blog
12:38 SPC Pre-Con
14:43 PowerShell Summit
16:13 SP2013 NOT supported on Win2012R2, yet
18:26 DCOM Errors in SharePoint
20:15 Migrating farm to farm – app_offline.htm
24:28 SQL 2012 W/SP1 early downloads may not actually include SP1
26:09 Windows installer bug in SQL 2012 with SP1
27:11 Surface 2 Details
41:00 Mouse without Borders
42:23 Shameless Self-Promotion
42:35 Hey Scripting Guy blog
42:48 SharePoint Conference Pre-con
42:57 SharePoint Exchange Forum

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ShortURL: http://www.toddklindt.com/Netcast171

  
No presence informationTodd O. Klindt10/4/2013 9:35 PMSharePoint 2013; PowerShell0 

We’ve all used the cmdlet Where-Object to loop through a collection of objects and filter in or out the ones we didn’t want. It’s been around since PowerShell was a pup. Its usage is a little klunky but looks essentially like this:

Get-SPSite | Where-Object { $_.owner –eq “contoso\todd” }

That statement takes the collection of objects returned by Get-SPSite and walks through each of them looking for the ones where the “owner” property is set to “contoso\todd.” The format is kind of odd, and it has one big risk, at least for an idiot like me. The code inside the curly braces actually gets executed like regular code then Where-Object looks to see if it returns a $true or $false. If you forget what the equal sign “=” does in PowerShell it can result in some hilarious things like what happened in this blog post. The current form of Where-Object lets you do things like this:

Get-SPSite | Where-Object { $_.owner = “contoso\todd” }

If you don’t use Where-Object a lot it’s an easy mistake to make. Unfortunately with that code snippet I set all the owners to contoso\todd  instead of finding all the site collections whose owner is contoso\todd. The equal sign in PowerShell is assignment, not evaluation.

I’ve made that mistake a few dozen times so I’ve taken to using –like instead of –eq or =. It’s tougher for me to replace with –like with = and put the wrong one in. I’ve had significantly fewer causalities since I made this change. Not zero, mind you, but fewer. Progress is good.

Then along came PowerShell v3.

With Windows 2012 or SharePoint 2013 we get PowerShell v3. And PowerShell v3 has a newer, cooler version of Where-Object. It does all the things above, but it adds a new way to filter. In PowerShell v3 we can use the following, safer, way to find the site collections that contoso\todd owns:

Get-SPSite | Where-Object –Property owner –Value contoso\todd –EQ

It is almost impossible for me to rename all my databases or overwrite all my owners with this new syntax. Since I found out about this new syntax I’ve been using it exclusively. Combine its increased safety and the fact that you can tab complete –Property, -Value, and –EQ and it’s a winner.

Also, with PowerShell v3 not all of the Help is installed with PowerShell. You can run Update-Help to get PowerShell to download the newest, most complete version of Help for all the modules that are installed. Before you start researching the new capabilities of Where-Object, make sure you update your Help first.

tk

ShortURL: http://www.toddklindt.com/WhereObjectV3 

  
No presence informationTodd O. Klindt9/23/2013 8:58 AMPowerShell0 

As my regular readers know, I’ve got quite a crush on Windows PowerShell. It has made my job as a SharePoint administrator easier, and honestly, more fun. The folks at PowerShell.org are having a big PowerShell shindig next year. Unfortunately because of scheduling problems I won’t be able to attend. Sad smile That doesn’t mean you shouldn’t go though. Here are the details:

What: PowerShell Summit North America 2014

When: April 28,29, and 30 2014

Where: Meydenbauer Center on Northeast 6th Street in Bellevue, WA

How much: $950, includes membership to PowerShell.org

Registration site: http://eventmgr.azurewebsites.net/home/event/PSNA2014 

My friend, and PowerShell Meister Don Jones is heading this thing up and it’s sure to be great. I’m already sad that I’m missing it.

If you want to be a better SharePoint Admin, being better at PowerShell is a great place to start.

tk

ShortURL: http://www.toddklindt.com/PoshSummit2014

  
No presence informationTodd O. Klindt9/23/2013 8:43 AMNetcast2 

This week we talk about whether it's Rad or Bad to use Kerberos in Central Admin. Then I discuss how a reader has helped me in my quest to upgrade my blog. Microsoft recently released a security patch for SharePoint and we cover why. Next I talk about a great SQL and SharePoint white paper that I stumbled onto. It includes some great suggestions on how to speed SharePoint. Then we talk a little about Windows Server 2012 R2 and Windows 8.1 and how groovy they both are.

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Running Time: 41:10

Links:

01:06 Production notes
02:06 YouTube Channel
03:00 No Kerberos on CA
12:46 Blog upgrade status
17:38 Privilege elevation patch
21:08 Storage and SQL Server capacity planning for SP2013
29:43 SharePoint 2013 on Windows 2012 R2 RTM
32:15 Windows 8.1 RTM on Surface Pro
36:37 Hey Scripting Guy!
38:33 Pro SP2013 Admin
39:25 SharePoint Conference

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ShortURL: http://www.toddklindt.com/Netcast170

  
No presence informationTodd O. Klindt9/20/2013 3:35 PMSharePoint 2013; Windows 8/8.14 

Laying rest to days and days of rumor and heated speculation, Microsoft has come out with the official word on SharePoint 2013 support on Windows 2012 R2. According to KB 2891274 it is NOT supported. Support for Windows 2012 R2 will be added to Service Pack 1 for SharePoint 2013. The release date for SP1 was not announced.

tk

ShortURL: http://www.toddklindt.com/NoSP2013OnWin2012R2

  
No presence informationTodd O. Klindt9/15/2013 6:00 PMNetcast0 

Tonight's episode is two in a row with good audio. Yay me! We talk about some techniques I recently used to track down a pesky email issue. Then we move on to more exciting news about SharePoint patches and we found out which one was recently rereleased. On the heels of that I talk about my blog post that explains when you should or shouldn't install a SharePoint patch. Then I cover some new functionality in the Where-Object PowerShell cmdlet that might save a SharePoint farm or two. Want a cheap Windows Phone? I tell you how to get one. Then I spend some time talking about Windows 8.1 and the new Surface devices that are coming out.

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Running Time: 39:41

Links:

0:00 - Welcome!
2:34 - Troubleshooting email
9:10 - Hey should I install this patch blog post
10:47 - Aug 2013 CU for SP2010 re-released
11:59 - Which Patch should I use?
15:28 - Where-Object update
18:50 - Cheap Windows Phone
21:29 - SP2010 on Windows 2012 R2
23:07 - Win2012R2 and Win8.1 on TechNet/MSDN
25:42 - Windows 8.1 review link
26:30 - Free Windows 2012 R2 Ebook
28:58 - Surface Pro 2 and Surface 2
32:38 - Kindle Matchbook
34:36 - D’arce Hess fundraising

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ShortURL: http://www.toddklindt.com/Netcast169

  
No presence informationTodd O. Klindt9/12/2013 1:23 PMSharePoint 2007; SharePoint 2010; SharePoint 20136 

Every 2nd Tuesday of the month is Patch Tuesday for those of us in the Microsoft ecosystem. A good time is had by all each month. SharePoint was included in the fun of this month’s patches, patching a couple of particularly nasty bugs. This includes SharePoint 2013 and SharePoint 2010. Not be left out, both SharePoint 2007 AND SharePoint 2003 get patched as well. The bug is that nasty. I don’t even have a blog tag for SharePoint 2003.

Read through my Hey! Should I install this SharePoint patch? blog post to see whether I recommend you install this patch or not.

Here are some notes:

SharePoint 2013

It looks like KB2817315 will require the March 2013 PU be installed before it will install and it will bump your build number up to 15.0.4435.1002.

It looks like KB810083 will also require the March 2013 PU be installed before it will install. It contains internationalized versions so it’s a good sized download at nearly 500 MB.

I don’t have any SharePoint 2013 VMs running at RTM, so I can’t verify those requirements. I gathered them by looking through each patch’s XML files. As I play with these patches more I’ll update this blog post.

Happy patching,

tk

ShortURL: http://www.toddklindt.com/MS13067

  
No presence informationTodd O. Klindt9/11/2013 9:42 PMSharePoint 2010; SharePoint 201310 

If I had a mailbag, this blog post would come from it. I got this email from Leo Ortiz:

We are getting ready to install SharePoint 2013 and I am reading the new SharePoint 2013 Administration book.
My question, very briefly, is why you wouldn't use Kerberos for Central Administration. The book didn't really provide an explanation other than it is not a farm-wide effect. Thank you for all your assistance. Again, a brief answer is ok.

I like this, Leo is holding my feet to the fire. It’s not enough that we say you shouldn’t do something. He’s not going to take our word for it, and who can blame him, I don’t trust us either. He wants to know why. Seems like a reasonable question. He went to all the trouble of buying the book (at least I hope he did), the least I can do is try to defend our position. Here’s what I sent back:

Leo,

If you’ve ever enabled Kerberos in SharePoint you know it’s not a simple process, and unless everything is lined up perfectly, it won’t work. And the things that that can go wrong are often outside the purview of the SharePoint administrator. Kerberos can be screwed up by DNS issues, AD issues, network issues, etc. When you flip the Kerberos switch and you can’t log in, what do you do? You go into Central Admin and switch it back. Except it’s actually Central Admin that’s broken! Now what do you do?? Of course you can break out PowerShell, but it’s still a pain.

But what it comes down to is there is a lot of risk with Kerberos, but there’s no reward. What does enabling Kerberos in Central Admin get you? In most cases Kerberos is enabled to support BI scenarios, which of course don’t exist in Central Admin. Another reason to use Kerberos is security. On paper, it’s easier to crack a password from a network trace if the web app is using NTLM instead of Kerberos. Considering the limited amount of time people spend in Central Admin, and that the traffic is exclusively internal, I don’t think it’s much of a risk. I think the risk of Kerberos locking you out of Central Admin is greater.

So that’s why we don’t recommend Kerberos for Central Admin. There are a lot of risks with Kerberos and in our opinion the rewards aren’t worth it. I hope that helps.

In later emails with Leo he confirmed that this explanation answered his question. After I did all that typing I thought, “Cool, free blog post!” and here it is. Thanks, Leo. Smile

tk

ShortURL: http://www.toddklindt.com/NoKerbonCA

  
No presence informationTodd O. Klindt9/10/2013 4:21 PMNetcast1 

Tonight we cover Steve Ballmer's abrupt departure from Microsoft and what that means for me. I cover a couple of fixes in the August 2013 CU for SharePoint 2010. Then I cover a way to rename your Search service databases, should you find yourself needing to do that. I helped one of my friends troubleshoot a SharePoint issue and I walk through that process in this netcast. Finally I get all excited that Windows 8.1 is finished and I can't wait to install it on everything, including my toaster and my couch. Oh, and the audio is much better this time.

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Running Time: 39:45

Links:

0:00 - Welcome!
3:30 - SteveB resignation
8:30 - Bunch of updates to patch wikis
9:50 - How to rename the search service application databases
13:45 - It's always permissions
17:35 - Georeplication of SharePoint
30:00 - Why my blog isn't on SharePoint 2013
33:00 - Windows 8.1
34:33 - Hey Scripting Guy blog
35:00 - Shameless Self-Promotion
37:00 - SharePoint Exchange Forum
38:00 - SharePoint Conference

 

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ShortURL: http://www.toddklindt.com/Netcast168

  
No presence informationTodd O. Klindt9/9/2013 3:36 PMWindows 8/8.10 

This is one of those blog posts where the title is almost all I need. Microsoft had said earlier that everyone, and they meant everyone, would get the Windows 8.1 and Windows Server 2012 R2 RTM bits at the same time in October. There was much public outcry and burning of Clippy in effigy. In what seems to be a trend lately, Microsoft made a decision, listened to reason, and changed their minds. Today, more than a month before the official Windows 8.1 RTM launch they put the RTM bits out on MSDN and TechNet. If you have an MSDN or TechNet account, warm up that cable modem or DSL and get your download on. If you grab Windows 2012 R2 don’t forget to grab the free ebook as well. Makes for good night time reading.

tk

ShortURL: http://www.toddklindt.com/Win81onMSDN

  
No presence informationTodd O. Klindt9/4/2013 4:23 PMWindows 8/8.10 

You know what the best price ever is? Free with a $20 Starbucks gift card. The second best price is free, and I found something free today that I really like. Today Microsoft Press released a free (that’s right, free!) eBook on Windows Server 2012 R2 Preview. They released on for Window Server 2012 and it was pretty good, so I was glad to see them do it again for Windows 2012 R2. Once again they have released it in the three main formats; PDF, ePub, and Mobi. Is that service or what? After Windows 2012 R2 RTM’s they promise to update the book.

If you have one of those fancy Kindles like I do, it gets even better. You can use Send To Kindle to send files through the Internet and onto your Kindle. After you install Send To Kindle you can right click on files and send them to your Kindle. The best part of this method is that it puts the book up into the Kindle Cloud, so it syncs between your devices and you can read it online.

If you don’t want to install Send To Kindle you can hook your Kindle up to your computer with a USB cable and copy the Mobi over.

However you choose to enjoy the book, please leave Microsoft a comment and thank them.

tk

ShortURL: http://www.toddklindt.com/FreeWin2012R2ebook

  
No presence informationTodd O. Klindt9/2/2013 11:13 PMSharePoint 2010; Windows 8/8.15 

I’ve been playing with the Windows 2012 R2 Preview for a while, and for the most part I approve. Of course once it came out everyone and their dog was installing SharePoint 2013 on it. Why not? SharePoint 2013 is new and cool. I don’t blame them. But I wanted to be original. I wanted to go old school. Plus everyone else blogged installing SharePoint 2013 on it before I could. So I decided to install SharePoint 2010 on it instead. Since SharePoint 2010 Service Pack 2 added Windows 2012 support I figured I’d roll the dice. Was I crazy? Could it be done? Read on and find out.

I didn’t do anything too fancy to set this up. I installed a Windows 2012 R2 domain controller in 2012 R2 domain mode and created all of my usual Service Accounts. Then I spun up a second Windows 2012 R2 VM and joined it to that domain. Since I really only cared about SharePoint, I started on that before I even installed SQL. If I could get the Prereqs installed and get the SharePoint 2010 bits laid down, then I’d take the time to install SQL 2012 SP1. Let’s spin the wheel and see what happens.

Sadly, I met with disappointment immediately. I ran the SharePoint 2010 Prereq installer and it failed on the very first step. Sad smile

9-2-2013 5-10-15 PM

Much like me in 7th grade football, the Prereq installer has one failure and just gives up. It wasn’t able to configure IIS on the server. That’s no surprise, IIS has changed a lot since SharePoint 2010 came out and Windows 2008 R2 was the cool kid on the block. Like any self-respecting nerd I dusted myself off, drank some Mountain Dew, and dove right into the log files to see what had gone wrong. The Prereq installer even had a link to the log file, almost daring me to try to figure out what happened. I opened the file and did a “Ctrl-F” find for “error.” I found our culprit:

9-2-2013 3-34-17 PM

The Prereq installer was trying to install the .NET components into IIS and not having much luck. For the benefit of search engines (and to make this blog post look longer than it really is) I’ve included the text from the error:

2013-09-01 16:05:03 - "C:\Windows\Microsoft.NET\Framework64\v2.0.50727\aspnet_regiis.exe" -i
2013-09-01 16:05:03 - Error: Unable to install (2)
2013-09-01 16:05:03 - Error: [In HRESULT format] (-2147024894)
2013-09-01 16:05:03 - Error when registering ASP.NET v2.0.50727 with IIS
2013-09-01 16:05:03 - Last return code (2)
2013-09-01 16:05:03 - Error: The tool was unable to install Application Server Role, Web Server (IIS) Role.
2013-09-01 16:05:03 - Last return code (2)
2013-09-01 16:05:03 - Options for further diagnostics: 1. Look up the return code value 2. Download the prerequisite manually and verify size downloaded by the prerequisite installer. 3. Install the prerequisite manually from the given location without any command line options.
2013-09-01 16:05:03 - Cannot retry

 

Fortunately it shows us exactly what the problem is. It tried to run aspnet_regiis.exe –i and it didn’t work. Out to the file system I go to see what’s up. It wasn’t good news:

9-2-2013 8-37-31 PM

Aspnet_regiis.exe was nowhere to be found. I’ve gotten pretty friendly with Windows 2012 so I had some ideas where to look for my missing friend. Since I was already in PowerShell I executed the following command:

Get-WindowsFeature | Where-Object {$_.name -like "*net*" }

If this doesn’t work for you, type Import-module servermanager to add the Get-WindowsFeature cmdlet.

This was to see which .NET features were installed. There was one Windows Feature that might be our missing link:

9-2-2013 8-52-50 PM

The ASP.NET 3.5 Feature includes .NET 2.0 and 3.0 so that might fit the bill. To add it, you’ll need your Windows 2012 R2 source media. Assuming your media is in your D: drive, the command to add it would look like this:

Add-WindowsFeature Web-Asp-Net -Source D:\sources\sxs

This will add the asp.net stuff that the Prereq installer wants. When you rerun the Prereq it’s all happy and it finishes successfully. On the back of this success I went ahead and installed SharePoint 2010. It worked. I decided to go for broke and see if I could actually get it all to work. I installed SQL and created a SharePoint farm. Once the farm was created I created a web app. Everything seems to work fine.

Here’s the finished product:

9-2-2013 9-32-29 PM

I know, I know. Portal.contoso.com could be hosted anywhere. You’ll just have to take my word for it.

Since Windows Server 2012 R2 isn’t out yet, so SharePoint 2010 doesn’t officially support it. It does seem to work though.

tk

ShortURL: http://www.toddklindt.com/SP2010onWin2012R2

  
No presence informationTodd O. Klindt9/1/2013 11:14 PMSharePoint 2010; SharePoint 2013; Sharepoint8 

I get this question all the time, so I thought I’d save us both a lot of time and write it down in a blog post. I maintain a list of SharePoint 2010 patches and SharePoint 2013 patches. These make for an easy way for SharePoint administrators to keep up with the latest patches for their favorite flavor of SharePoint. Because of this I get a lot of questions about whether someone should install a specific patch or not. I’ll try to answer that question here.

The answer to “Should I install this SharePoint patch” depends a lot on the type of patch we’re talking about. Because of that I’ve broken the next part down by patch type.

Hotfix or Critical On Demand (COD)

What is it?

A hotfix or COD patch is a patch that is critical and can’t wait for a Cumulative Update or Service Pack. It might be security fix, or it might be a functionality fix. It’s issued as a one-off fix for an issue. Often it’s suggested to a customer by Microsoft PSS after troubleshooting an issue. A hotfix may contain fixes for one or more components in SharePoint.

Should I install it?

If PSS recommends a hotfix to fix your issue, you should consider installing it. If possible, install it in a test environment where you can reproduce the issue to verify that it fixes it. PSS has smart people, but SharePoint is a complicated beast and you shouldn’t install any patches that don’t fix anything.

If you hear about this hotfix from some place other than PSS be very careful. Only install a hotfix if it fixes an issue you’re currently experiencing and it’s a high profile problem. Hotfixes aren’t tested very thoroughly so they present a risk when installed. They might fix one issue, but they could cause another one. If you’re considering installing a hotfix install it in a test environment first and kick the tires a bit to make sure the cure isn’t worse than the illness. You cannot uninstall any SharePoint patches, so be very sure you want this patch on your farm as they’re mated for life once you install it.

 

Cumulative Update (CU)

What is it?

Cumulative Updates (CUs) come out every even numbered month; February, April, June, etc. They contain all the patches from the previous CUs since the last major patch (RTM or Service Pack) and all the hotfixes released since then. The “cumulative” part means if you install the August 2012 CU you don’t need install the June 2012 CU first. CUs are also cumulative in the sense that the SharePoint Server patch includes the patches for SharePoint Foundation. The Project Server CU includes the SharePoint Server and SharePoint Foundation patches as well. You only need to install the CU for the product you have. This is a welcome change from SharePoint 2007 where we had to stack the patches. Also, CUs contains the patches for all the supported languages which is why they’re so large. If you have a language pack installed, its binaries are also patched by the CU. When it works, you can also slipstream CUs into your install media to reduce your installation time.

 

Should I install it?

Each CU comes with a Knowledge Base article that describes the fixes in it. You should only consider installing a CU if you can point at a fix in that KB article that your farm needs. If it doesn’t offer any fixes you need, you should pass on it. If it does fix something that is plaguing your farm, then install the CU in a test environment to verify the fix. You should also poke around the test environment to see if everything else still works. CUs often contain Regressions. A Regression is when something that used to work doesn’t work anymore. The software has regressed. And speaking of Regressions, CUs are chock full of them. At least three SharePoint 2010 CUs were pulled because the Regressions were so bad. For instance, the April 2012 CU for SharePoint 2010, was out for a full month before it was pulled. Remember, you cannot uninstall any SharePoint patches, so if you get all antsy and install a CU without testing it first and it breaks something, you’re stuck with it.

 

Public Update (PU?)

What is it?

This is kind of a weird one. In March of 2013, Microsoft released the first Public Update I’ve ever seen. It was for SharePoint 2013. This patch is a cross between a Cumulative Update and a Service Pack. Microsoft announced they consider the March 2013 PU to be the baseline for SharePoint 2013

Should I install it?

Yes. Along with saying they consider the March 2013 PU the baseline for SharePoint 2013, they also said that all subsequent patches will require it. That means to install any CUs or SPs after it, you’ll need to have the March 2013 PU installed. So install it in your test environment, test it for 30 days, then install it in your Production environment.

 

Service Pack (SP)

What is it?

The big daddy of the SharePoint patches, the Service Pack. Service Packs are contain all the patches that come before them. They are a major patch release. They go through months of testing before they are released and sometimes have beta releases. Service Packs are also language specific. The service pack’s language needs to match SharePoint’s installed language.  Language packs also have separate service packs.

 

Should I install it?

Yes. Service Packs are important milestones and you should plan to install them into your farms. Of course you should always install them into a test environment first since you cannot uninstall any SharePoint patches. After you and your users have tested the Service Packed for a minimum of a month you should plan a planned outage and install it in your Production environment. If you have any language packs installed, remember to install the service pack for the language packs too.

 

Hopefully that helps you decide whether to inflict a patch on your SharePoint farm.

tk

ShortURL: http://www.toddklindt.com/ShouldIInstallPatch

  
No presence informationTodd O. Klindt8/27/2013 10:01 PMNetcast0 

The audio is scratchy this week. Sorry. :( I think I've got it fixed for next week. I know, my voice is grating enough without the technical problems.

Once again, this week's Netcast spends a lot of time discussing patching. That's because there's a lot of great patching news to discuss. The August CUs for SharePoint 2010 and 2013 have been released for our amusement. I talk about them for a bit. SharePoint 2010 with SP2 built in has snuck out to MSDN and we discuss what that means for new installs. Sadly, SP2 is not all roses and kittens and we have to chat about that a bit too. Then I cover a few non SharePoint things like how to disable the Metro IE in Windows 8 and 8.1, when Windows 8.1 and 2012 R2 will RTM, and another fun way to watch my Netcast with a Chromecast. It's casttastic!

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Running Time: 44:02

Links:

1:50 -- Prod Notes
6:05 -- site collection created in 2010 version doesn't work to backup and restore to actual 2010
7:45 -- Gradual site delete
10:15 - MS13-052 rereleased
11:50 -- August 2013 CU for SharePoint 2013
13:32 -- August 2013 CU for SharePoint 2010
14:45 -- March PU comments
16:45 -- August 2013 CU for SP2010 may not install without SP1
18:10 -- SP2010 w/SP2 available on MSDN
19:55 -- SP2010 SP2 issues section
24:00 -- SP2 doesn't include everything before it
26:08 -- Running Config Wizard with SQL Availability Groups
28:22 -- Usage DB doesn't like being in an availability group
29:25 -- Permissions not copied for another instance of SQL for availability groups
33:00 -- Windows 8 open links in desktop IE
34:30 -- Official release date for Windows updates
35:40 -- Chromecast
38:48 -- Shameless self promotion

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SharePoint 2013 Professional Administration

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ShortURL: http://www.toddklindt.com/Netcast167

  
No presence informationTodd O. Klindt8/22/2013 11:16 AMNetcast0 

Tonight's episode is live from SPTechCon and recorded in front of a live audience. I also begrudgingly let Shane on camera. We chatted about a very generous gift one viewer gave me. Then we cover some of the specifics when upgrading from SharePoint 2007, yes 2007, to SharePoint 2013. We also discuss some new information that came out about Shredded Storage.

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Running Time: 36:07

Links:

00:00 -- Welcome
00:47 -- Sharepoint.rackspace.com
2:15 -- Online class with Todd
2:30 -- Des Moines class
3:15 -- Food (Steakhouse)
5:45 -- Production Notes
6:40 -- Lori Gowin Cameo
7:50 -- SPTechCon Topics
8:05 -- Care Package
9:28 -- Upgrade Session
10:00 -- 2007-2013 upgrade topics
20:20 -- User Profile Upgrade 2007-2010/13
21:30 -- Services Farm
23:30 -- 3rd Party tools
26:05 -- Ads update in UStream
26:20 -- Office Web Apps
28:20 -- Technet whitepaper on Shredded Storage
30:20 -- Shameless Self Promotion
30:40 -- Pro SharePoint Admin
31:25 -- Todd's book link to buy with autograph
32:05 -- Todd & Shane's webinar recordings
33:56 -- Online Training
34:30 -- Des Moines Training

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ShortURL: http://www.toddklindt.com/Netcast166

  
No presence informationTodd O. Klindt8/18/2013 5:58 PMSharePoint 201021 

Now that SharePoint is out a bunch of us SharePoint nerds are champing at the bit to get it installed. One of the jobs of the trailblazers is to find the rough spots so the folks that follow don’t have to lose wagon wheels in them. This is one of those cases.

First, let me say that my investigation into this bug is very much in its infancy. I don’t know exactly what causes it, and it doesn’t seem to be completely reproducible. I wanted to get it out there in case anyone else is banging their head against a wall because of it. I also needed something to point at in my wiki of SP2. I’ll update this post and the wiki page as I learn more.

Now to the bug. In some cases adding a Content Editor Web Part (CEWP) to a page breaks the ability to add more web parts to the page. The “Add Web Part” link is gray. Removing the CEWP from the page fixes it. It looks like this only happens if you modify the master page or CSS for the page. I haven’t seen it happen with out of the box pages. Here are a couple of screenshots to show what I saw:

SharePoint 2010 SP2 add

In this shot we see a regular told Team site in SharePoint 2010. Service Pack 2 has been installed on the server. In the top right we are logged in to the page and we’re editing it. We are able to add web parts to the page. There are no CEWPs on the page. In the lower left we can see the page allows anonymous access, and that for anonymous users the ribbon is hidden. I used Randy Drisgill’s technique here to modify the master page to remove the ribbon for anonymous users. I used the same technique on this blog to help some Android devices render pages correctly. Everything is good.

Then I added a CEWP to the page and the wheels fell off.

SharePoint 2010 SP2 No add

I added an empty CEWP to the page and saved it. Then I opened it back up to edit it. The upper left browser shows that all the options are grayed out. The lower right shows the page still renders fine with the CEWP in it. Removing the CEWP fixes the page.

I’ve bounced this off of a few folks and they’ve all been able to reproduce it to varying degrees. There appear to be a couple different master page and CSS tweaks that trigger it, and a couple of webparts beside the CEWP that it happens with. It appears that SharePoint does some checks on the page before it lights up the “Add Webpart” box and for whatever reason the page now fails these checks. As I get more information and verify it I’ll add it to this blog post. If you have information to share, leave it in a comment below.

At the time of this blog post the latest SharePoint 2010 build is the August 2013 CU, build 14.0.7106.5000. It still has this problem.

Thanks,

tk

ShortURL: http://www.toddklindt.com/CEWPbreaksSP2010SP2

  
No presence informationTodd O. Klindt8/18/2013 10:14 AMSharePoint 20104 

In the past we’ve had the SharePoint 2010 install media, and we’ve had SharePoint 2010 Service Pack 2, but we’ve never had the SharePoint 2010 install media that included Service Pack 2. It was a sad state of affairs. We were all very sad. Songs were written in minor keys about it.

Put those acoustic guitars away, our dreams have been answered. New to the MSDN downloads area is a new SharePoint 2010 installer that includes Service Pack 2. This is a great thing. Now, as soon as Service Pack 2 was available we could slipstream it in to our existing SharePoint 2010 installation using the instruction in my earlier blog post. This was fine and dandy, as long as you weren’t on Windows Server 2012. The slipstreaming really just installs the patch at the end of the installation process, and that’s not soon enough if you’re on Windows Server 2012. With this new ISO off of MSDN you can install SharePoint 2010 directly on Windows Server 2012. I have not tested this with the Windows 2012 R2 Beta that is out, but my gut tells me it will work.

While this is only available on MSDN I would assume it will be available shortly to the public. Once it is, I’ll post the link here.

Let me know if you have any issues using this media. If there are problems, I’ll keep track of them on my SharePoint 2010 Service Pack 2 wiki page.

tk

ShortURL: http://www.toddklindt.com/SP2010SP2ISO

  
No presence informationTodd O. Klindt8/16/2013 4:08 PMSharePoint 2013; PowerShell0 

Now that I’m home and all rested up I thought I’d post the link to the slides from SPTechCon this week. The slides can all be found at http://www.toddklindt.com/SPTechConAug2013. That includes all of our slide decks, including the Lightning Talk! I also included the transcript from our PowerShell session.

If anything is missing or you have any questions, let me know.

tk

ShortURL: http://www.toddklindt.com/SPTechConAug2013Wrapup

  
No presence informationTodd O. Klindt8/11/2013 10:47 PMNetcast2 

The big news in this Netcast is the unveiling of the much anticipated Service Pack 2 for SharePoint. We discuss the good and the bad with it. There's always a little touch of bad in new patches. We talk about a patch that fixes a .NET patch that broke SharePoint 2010 earlier. Now we can have our .NET patch and our SharePoint too. Stuck on patches I talk about a script you can run that will speed up patching SharePoint 2013. Then we talk about some other great links I've stumbled across in the last week.

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Running Time: 42:34

Links:

00:00 - Welcome
01:42 – Production Notes
07:33 – Service Pack 2
11:53 – Service Pack 2 and the June CU
14:52 – Custom List views & KBURL
16:55 - .Net patch breaks SP
18:00 - March PU takes forever
20:45 – SharePoint wasn’t the problem for Snowden leak
25:52 – Design Manger/IE 10 issues
27:12 – Authorization Prompts for PDF Anonymous access
28:30 – PowerShell cmdlets for Storage/Files
29:30 – Header too Large
32:35 – Shameless Self Promotion

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SharePoint 2013 Professional Administration

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ShortURL: http://www.toddklindt.com/Netcast165

  
No presence informationTodd O. Klindt7/29/2013 8:35 PMNetcast0 

Tonight's Netcast has better audio, thank goodness. That means you can actually hear me when I discuss exciting topics like troubleshooting Incoming E-Mail and how Windows patches continue to kill poor defenseless SharePoint 2010 servers. I also cover how you can leverage your PowerShell expertise to recover items from the Recycle Bin. No mouse needed!

MP3 File

WMV File

iPod File

YouTube (Subscribe)

Running Time: 47:25

Links:

00:00 – Welcome
02:24 – Production Notes
09:56 – Email/Subscribe to netcast/feeds
10:35 – Incoming e-mail does not pickup e-mail on SharePoint 2013 and Windows Server 2012
18:06 – MS13-052 is still breaking SharePoint 2010
21:49 – Access the Recycle Bin with PowerShell (cached copy)
25:28 – Database Repair with STSADM
28:16 – Loopback Check nearly got me again
35:08 – Old Netcasts?
37:29 – Surface Adapters
38:25 – Shameless self-promotion


SharePoint Cruise survey
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SharePoint 2013 Professional Administration

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ShortURL: http://www.toddklindt.com/Netcast164

  
No presence informationTodd O. Klindt7/19/2013 3:32 PMNetcast0 

Tonight's show has a bunch of non SharePoint content it, and it's all good. I start off talking about some changes I'm making to the video download for this Netcast. Unless there's a public outcry I'm going to switch both video feeds to MP4 files. Next I talk about a blog post I read about using the Office Web Apps with files in a file share. Then I talk about scaling out SharePoint 2013 Search.  Then I spend some time talking about how much I love my Surface RT and how now anyone can get one for the low, low price of $350. I spend the rest of the Netcast talking about SharePoint and Windows patches that are hell-bent on destroying your precious, defenseless SharePoint farm.

MP3 File

WMV File

iPod File

YouTube (Subscribe)

Running Time: 43:58

Links:

New Media Expo (9:00)

Taking Office Web Apps 2013 and SharePoint 2013 integration one step further (15:23)

Configure highly available Search in SharePoint 2013 (22:20)

MS13-052 breaks SharePoint (31:50)

SharePoint-Community.net (34:47)

UStream Premium Membership (no commercials during the live stream)

SharePoint 2013 Professional Administration

TechEd North America

TechEd Europe

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ShortURL: http://www.toddklindt.com/Netcast163

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